ARTICLE A.  HIDDEN SPRINGS PLANNED COMMUNITY ZONING ORDINANCElinklink

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8-21A-1: SHORT TITLE:
8-21A-2: DEFINITIONS:
8-21A-3: PURPOSE AND INTENT:
8-21A-4: APPLICABILITY:
8-21A-5: PERMITTED RESIDENTIAL AND NONRESIDENTIAL USES:
8-21A-6: DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN GUIDELINES:
8-21A-7: ADMINISTRATIVE/OTHER REGULATIONS:
8-21A-8: AMENDMENTS:
8-21A-9: SPECIFIC PLAN:
8-21A-9-1: VISION STATEMENT:
8-21A-9-2: GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES:
8-21A-9-3: POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT TRENDS:
8-21A-9-4: POPULATION PROJECTIONS:
8-21A-9-5: EXISTING CONDITIONS OVERVIEW:
8-21A-9-6: VICINITY MAP:
8-21A-9-7: HISTORICAL OVERVIEW:
8-21A-9-8: SLOPES:
8-21A-9-9: ASPECT/VIEWS/CLIMATE:
8-21A-9-10: GEOLOGIC CONDITIONS:
8-21A-9-11: SOIL CONDITIONS:
8-21A-9-12: SURFACE WATER HYDROLOGY:
8-21A-9-13: GROUND WATER:
8-21A-9-14: GEOTECHNICAL CHARACTERIZATION:
8-21A-9-15: VEGETATION:
8-21A-9-16: WILDLIFE RESOURCES:
8-21A-9-17: CULTURAL RESOURCES:
8-21A-9-18: LAND USE PATTERNS:
8-21A-9-19:SITE ANALYSIS: SUMMARY OF OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS:
8-21A-9-20: CENTRAL PLANNING CONCEPTS:
8-21A-9-21: PLAN OVERVIEW:
8-21A-9-22: PHASING PLAN:
8-21A-9-23: ROADS AND CIRCULATION:
8-21A-9-24: TRAFFIC STRATEGY:
8-21A-9-25: TRIP REDUCTION STRATEGY:
8-21A-9-26: OPEN SPACE AND TRAILS STRATEGY:
8-21A-9-27: WILDFIRE PREVENTION STRATEGY:
8-21A-9-28: WILDLIFE STRATEGY:
8-21A-9-29: WATER SUPPLY:
8-21A-9-30: WATER SYSTEM:
8-21A-9-31: WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT:
8-21A-9-32: WATER CONSERVATION:
8-21A-9-33: SEWER SYSTEM:
8-21A-9-34: STORM DRAINAGE SYSTEM:
8-21A-9-35: SHERIFF, FIRE AND EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES:
8-21A-9-36: LANDSCAPE STRATEGY:
8-21A-9-37: ESSENTIAL PUBLIC SERVICES AND ANTICIPATED FINANCING PLAN:
8-21A-9-38: ZONING MAP:
8-21A-9-39: HIDDEN SPRINGS LEGAL DESCRIPTION:
8-21A-10: DESIGN REQUIREMENTS:
8-21A-10-1: PURPOSE AND INTENT STATEMENT:
8-21A-10-2: ARCHITECTURE:
8-21A-10-3: SITE DESIGN:
8-21A-10-4: SITE GRADING AND DRAINAGE:
8-21A-10-5: LANDSCAPE DESIGN:
8-21A-10-6: SIGNAGE:
8-21A-10-7: LIGHTING:
8-21A-10-8: FENCES AND WALLS:
8-21A-10-9: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION:

8-21A-1: SHORT TITLE:linklink


This article shall be known, cited and referred to as the HIDDEN SPRINGS PLANNED COMMUNITY ZONING ORDINANCE. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
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8-21A-2: DEFINITIONS:linklink

The following definitions shall be used in the interpretation and construction of the Hidden Springs planned community zoning ordinance; words used in the present tense include the future; the singular number shall include the plural and the plural the singular; the word "building" shall include the word "structure", the word "used" shall include "arranged", "designed", "constructed", "altered", "converted", "rented", "leased", or "intended to be used", and the word "shall" is mandatory and not directory. Any term used in this article not defined herein, shall have the meaning set forth in chapter 1, article A of this title. Any term not defined herein or in chapter 1, article A of this title, shall have its plain and ordinary meaning.

ACCESSORY APARTMENT OR GUEST HOUSE: A fully functional living unit including a kitchen, bathroom, etc., which may be rented for income, provide residence in barter for personal services, or accommodate a family member who wishes to live in a separate structure on the same lot.

ACCESSORY USE OR STRUCTURE: A use, building or structure that is customarily incidental and subordinate to the principal permitted use or approved administrative permit use, and is conducted or located upon the same lot.

ADMINISTRATIVE: Pertaining to the performance of executive duties or directing the execution, application or conduct of duties of an office, business or institution.

ADMINISTRATIVE PERMIT: A permit issued by the director for administrative permit uses specified in subsection 8-21A-7E of this article.

ADMINISTRATIVE PERMIT USE: A use or occupancy of a structure, or a use of land, permitted only upon issuance of an administrative permit and subject to the limitations and conditions specified therein.

AFFECTED PERSON: Same meaning as is ascribed to such term by Idaho Code section 67-6521, as amended from time to time.

AGRICULTURAL COMMERCIAL OVERLAY: Those areas depicted upon the Hidden Springs zoning map where agricultural commercial uses, as detailed in subsection 8-21A-5C2 of this article, are permitted.

AGRICULTURAL COMMERCIAL USE: Those principal permitted and administrative permit agricultural commercial uses described in subsection 8-21A-5C2 of this article.

AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION AREA: That area depicted upon the Hidden Springs master land use plan map.

AGRICULTURAL OUTBUILDINGS: Any building or structure which is used for storage or shelter of farming materials, equipment, supplies, products or animals.

AGRICULTURAL SERVICE ESTABLISHMENT: An establishment primarily engaged in performing animal husbandry or horticultural services, including agricultural milling and processing, harvesting, agricultural land preparation, irrigation and farm equipment sales and service, veterinary services, boarding or training of horses, and agricultural produce stands.

AGRICULTURE AND AGRICULTURAL OPERATIONS: The growing of cultivated crops, fruit trees, berry bushes, grazing, pasturage, raising of domestic livestock, horticulture, floriculture, viticulture, and the necessary accessory uses for packing, treating or storing of produce. The operation of any accessory uses to agricultural purposes shall not include a commercial packing facility, feedlot or stockyard, the commercial feeding of garbage or offal to swine or other animals, a slaughterhouse, the operation of a fertilizer works, nor plants for the reduction of animal matter.

ALLEY: A public or private way affording only secondary means of access to abutting property at the back or side of a property.

ANIMAL CLINIC OR VETERINARY OFFICE: Any building or portion thereof designed or used for the care or treatment of cats, dogs or other animals in which veterinary services including clipping, bathing, boarding and other services are rendered to dogs, cats and other small animals and domestic pets. Small animal hospital or veterinary hospital is the same as a small animal or veterinary clinic, the distinction being that in the case of an animal hospital there is a licensed veterinarian on the premises.

APPLICANT: Any owner or person with a proprietary interest in real property within the boundaries of the Hidden Springs Planned Community who submits any application under this Article.

ARTICLE: This Hidden Springs Planned Community Zoning Ordinance.

BASEMENT: That portion of a building between the floor and ceiling which is partly below and partly above grade, but so located that the vertical distance from grade to the floor below is less than the vertical distance from grade to ceiling. A basement, when used for dwelling purposes, shall be counted as a story for purposes of height measurement, and as a half-story for purposes of side yard determination.

BARN: Any structure used to house domestic livestock.

BED AND BREAKFAST ESTABLISHMENT: A building where meals and/or lodging are provided for compensation to three (3) or more persons, but not more than twelve (12) persons, and who are not members of the householder's family.

BOARD: The Board of County Commissioners of Ada County, Idaho.

BOARD CHAIRMAN: Chairman of the Ada County Board of County Commissioners.

BOARDER: See definition of Roomers And Boarders.

BUILDING: Any structure securely affixed to the land, and having a roof supported by columns or walls, and entirely separated on all sides from any other structure by space or by walls in which there are no communicating doors, windows or openings, which is designed or intended for the shelter, enclosure or protection of persons, animals, chattels or property of any kind.

Building Coverage: The total allowable percentage of a lot that may be covered by a building or buildings.

Building Envelope: Areas of land within which all site disturbances (construction of buildings, sitework, etc.) shall be conducted.

Building Height: The vertical distance from the average contact ground level at the front wall of the building to the highest point of the coping of a flat roof or to the deck line of a mansard roof, or to the mean height level between eaves and ridge for gable, hip or gambrel roofs.

Building Massing: The three-dimensional (3-D) bulk and scale of a building.

Building Site: The ground area of a building or group of buildings together with all open spaces as required by this Article.

CAFE: See definition of Restaurant.

CLINIC: A building, other than a hospital, used by one or more licensed physicians, dentists or licensed health care professionals for the purpose of receiving and treating patients.

CLUB, LODGE OR SOCIAL HALL: The social use of a building or of any premises by a profit or nonprofit association.

CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT OR CLUSTERING: Clustering of buildings, garages, and drives to minimize site disruption and/or maximize open space. Clustering techniques may include, but are not limited to, shared driveways, key or flag lots, and cul-de-sacs.

COMMERCIAL STABLE AND RIDING SCHOOLS: For profit stables and horse riding schools.

COMMERCIAL USE: The purchase, sale or other transaction involving the handling or disposition of any article, substance or commodity for livelihood or profit, or the ownership or management of office buildings, offices, recreational or amusement enterprises or the maintenance and use of offices by professions and trades rendering services including all advertising, events and other activities associated with such commercial use.

COMMISSION: The Planning and Zoning Commission of Ada County, Idaho.

COMMON AREAS: Those areas which are used, owned or managed jointly by a group of residences, businesses or association(s). Common areas include, but are not limited to, open spaces, parking areas, pathways, and parks.

COMMUNITY CENTER: That portion of Hidden Springs more particularly described in subsection 8-21A-5C3 of this Article which is intended to include the recreational and community service uses that will form the social hub of the community.

COMMUNITY EVENT: Any temporary event within Hidden Springs including, without limitation, picnics, barbecues, holiday events and parties, dances, concerts, bike rides and races, foot races and walks, auctions and sales, bazaars, sales or marketing events and harvest festivals and events.

   Community Event, Private: Any event for or by Hidden Springs residents and/or owners and their respective guests, in which participation is by invitation only and not by public advertisements; provided however, all real estate sales and marketing events and activities including, without limitation, model homes being advertised and open to the general public and real estate "open houses" advertised to the general public, normal and customary educational, religious and other activities conducted at schools and churches and commercial uses and activities on the premises of commercial businesses advertised to the general public shall be classified as private community events and not as public community events.

  Community Event, Public: Any event for the public at large which is advertised to the general public other than private community events described above.

CONDOMINIUM: A condominium within Hidden Springs shall have the same meaning as set forth in Idaho Code section 55-101B, as the same is amended and modified from time to time, and as further defined and described in the Idaho Condominium Property Act.

CONVALESCENT HOME: A home, place or institution licensed by the Idaho State Department of Health and Welfare as a nursing home which operates or maintains facilities providing convalescence or chronic care or both for a period in excess of twenty four (24) consecutive hours for three (3) or more patients not related by blood or marriage to the operator, said patients who by reason of illness or infirmity are unable to properly care for themselves.

CORRAL: See definition of Paddock, Pasture Or Corral.

COUNTY: Ada County, Idaho.

DEDICATION: The setting apart of land or interests in land for public use, charitable, religious or educational purposes, including the granting of any and all conservation easements.

DIRECTOR: The Ada County Director of Development Services or an authorized representative thereof.

DOMESTIC LIVESTOCK: Horses, cattle, dairy animals, sheep, goats, and other grazing animals, excluding swine. It shall also include rabbits and domestic birds, excluding chickens. Domestic livestock also excludes such birds as are caged and housed inside the dwelling and are not raised for commercial use.

DRAINAGE: The removal of excess waters from land by means of surface or subsurface conduits.

DRIVE-IN ESTABLISHMENT: An establishment, other than a service station or truck stop, which is designed to encourage or permit customers to receive services, obtain goods, or be entertained, while remaining in their motor vehicles.

DUPLEX: A building of no more than two (2) stories in height designed for or used by two (2) families or housekeeping units.

DWELLING: Any building or portion thereof designed or used as the residence or as separate living quarters of one or more persons, but not including a tent, trailer or a room in a hotel, motel, or bed and breakfast establishment.

Dwelling, Multi-Family: A building or portion thereof designed for or used by three (3) or more families or housekeeping units.

Dwelling, Single-Family: A building designed for or used exclusively for residence purposes by one family or housekeeping unit.

EASEMENT: A right to use, falling short of ownership, and usually for a certain stated purpose.

EMPLOYMENT CENTERS: The contemplated Hidden Springs employment facilities more particularly described in subsection 8-21A-5C6 of this Article.

ENGINEER, COUNTY: That licensed professional engineer appointed by the Board.

EQUESTRIAN CENTER: The Hidden Springs equestrian facility more particularly described in subsection 8-21A-5C4 of this Article.

ESSENTIAL PUBLIC SERVICES: As provided in the Ada County Comprehensive Plan these shall include, but are not limited to, water systems, public safety services, wastewater collection and treatment systems, storm water detention and drainage facilities and structures, public schools, streets, roads and open space.

FAR: Floor to Area Ratio.

FEMA: Federal Emergency Management Agency.

FAMILY: A person living alone, or two (2) or more persons living together as a single housekeeping unit, in a dwelling unit, as distinguished from a group occupying a bed and breakfast establishment, boarding house, lodging house, motel or hotel.

FAMILY DAY CARE HOME: "Family day care home" shall have the same meaning as ascribed to it in Idaho Code section 39-1102, as amended from time to time.

FARM/RANCH LOTS: Lots as more particularly described in subsection 8-21A-5B1 of this Article.

FLOOD PLAIN: In this Article, flood plain refers to the 100-year flood plain as defined by the Federal Emergency Management Act ("FEMA"), and as otherwise defined in this Title.

FREESTANDING GARAGE OR STORAGE STRUCTURE: An enclosed building designed for private storage or parking of noncommercial vehicles.

GRADE: The elevation of the finished surface of the ground adjacent to the midpoint of any exterior wall of a building or structure.

GRAIN STORAGE FACILITY: Any facility used to store any harvested crop.

GREENHOUSE: A building whose roof and sides are made largely of transparent or translucent material and in which the temperature and humidity can be regulated for the cultivation of plants, for private use or public sale.

GROUP DAY CARE FACILITY: Group day care facility shall have the same meaning as ascribed to it in Idaho Code section 39-1102, as amended from time to time.

GUEST HOUSE: See definition of Accessory Apartment.

HEALTH CLUB FACILITY: Any facility providing exercise services to its customers.

HIDDEN SPRINGS DESIGN REVIEW COMMITTEE OR DESIGN REVIEW COMMITTEE: That certain design review committee (DRC) referenced in the design guidelines approved as a part of the Hidden Springs Specific Plan.

HIDDEN SPRINGS GREENWAY: That area adjacent to Dry Creek which is dedicated to, and for the use of the public.

HIDDEN SPRINGS HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION: The Idaho nonprofit or profit corporation whose members or stockholders consist exclusively of property owners within Hidden Springs and whose purpose is to provide for the administration and governance of the affairs of Hidden Springs.

HIDDEN SPRINGS MASTER LAND USE PLAN: See definition of Master Land Use Plan.

HIDDEN SPRINGS OR HIDDEN SPRINGS PLANNED COMMUNITY: That area depicted on the Hidden Springs Zoning Map, as amended from time to time.

HIDDEN SPRINGS SPECIFIC PLAN: The Hidden Springs Specific Plan consists of the goals, objectives, policies, maps (such as sketch plan maps), development standards/administration provisions and other components of the Hidden Springs application for a planned rural community which have been adopted by the Board, and which shall serve as a guide for development. A copy of the approved Hidden Springs Specific Plan is on file with the Ada County Development Services Department.

HIDDEN SPRINGS ZONING MAP OR ZONING MAP: Map depicting the Hidden Springs Planned Community boundary and the zoning districts and overlay districts within this boundary.

HOME OCCUPATION: An accessory use to a dwelling unit for gainful employment involving the manufacture, provision or sale of goods and/or services.

KENNEL: Any facility used for the boarding or training of domestic animals.

LARGE LOTS: Lots as more particularly described in subsection 8-21A-5B3 of this Article.

LODGE: See definition of Club, Lodge Or Social Hall.

LOT: A parcel of land which meets any of the lot requirements of this Article for use, design and dimensional standards and is for transfer of ownership or development, including, but not limited to, condominiums. Such parcel of land may be developed if it complies with all applicable provisions of this Article.

Lot, Depth: The mean horizontal distance between the front and the rear lot lines. Where the lot is irregular and the lot lines converge, the rear lot line shall be deemed to be a line at a point where the side lot lines are not less than ten feet (10') apart.

Lot Line, Front: The line separating the lot from the principal street on which it fronts.

Lot Line, Rear: The lot line opposite and most distant from the front lot line.

Lot Line, Side: Any lot line other than a front or rear lot line. A side lot line separating a lot from a street is also called a side street or flanking street lot line. A side lot line separating a lot from another lot or lots is also called an interior side lot line.

Lot, Lines: The property lines bounding the lot.

Lot, Width: The mean width of the lot measured at right angles to its depth, provided however, that the minimum lot width required in each district shall be measured at a distance from the front line equal to the required least depth of the front yard.

MASTER DEVELOPER: Grossman Family Properties, or its assigns.

MASTER LAND USE PLAN: The Plan contained within the Hidden Springs Specific Plan which depicts residential uses, nonresidential uses, and nonresidential overlays.

MEETING HALL: See definition of Community Center.

MODEL HOME: A single-family dwelling or a unit within a duplex or multi-family dwelling which is shown to prospective buyers of lots or dwellings for the purpose of promoting the retail sale of lots or dwellings within Hidden Springs.

NURSERY: Land and/or greenhouses used to raise flowers, shrubs and plants, for private use or public sale on site. The combined floor area for all structures used for retail sales may not exceed two thousand (2,000) square feet.

OPEN SPACE: The area depicted on the Hidden Springs Master Land Use Plan as described in subsection 8-21A-5C5 of this Article which shall remain open and free of development other than wildlife habitat improvements, trails, other recreational improvements and agricultural uses; provided however, that changes in the boundaries of the open space are acceptable as long as the total acreage of the open space does not decrease below eight hundred ten (810) acres.

PADDOCK, PASTURE OR CORRAL: A small enclosure near a stable where horses are exercised.

PARCEL: A contiguous unit of land owned by, or recorded as, theproperty of the same person or persons.

PARCEL BOUNDARY ADJUSTMENT: The division for conveyance of a lot or parcel of land for the purpose of adjusting the boundary between parcels where: the dimensions of the parcels are not reduced below the minimum dimensional standards for its applicable zone; there is no increase in the original number of parcels; and, no easements, public streets, private streets or publicly dedicated areas are affected. A parcel boundary adjustment shall not move or affect the location of any platted lot line.

PARK AND RIDE FACILITY: Facility designed to allow Hidden Springs residents to park their vehicles in order to car pool or ride in a van or bus to various locations throughout the Treasure Valley, usually, however, to work.

PARKING AREA (PRIVATE): An open area, other than a street or public way, designed, arranged and made available for the storage of private passenger automobiles of occupants of the building or buildings for which the parking area is developed and is necessary and accessory.

PARKING AREA OR LOT (PUBLIC): An open area, other than a street or public way, to be used for the storage, for limited periods of time, of operable passenger automobiles and commercial vehicles, and available to the public, whether for compensation, free, or as an accommodation to clients or customers.

PARKING SPACE: A usable space within a public or private parking area or a building of not less than one hundred eighty (180) square feet, either within a structure or in the open for the parking of motor vehicles.

PARKING STRUCTURE: A structure designed and used for vehicular parking and located near the building which it serves.

PASTURE: See definition of Paddock, Pasture Or Corral.

PERSONAL SERVICE RETAIL: Retail oriented towards personal services.

PHASED DEVELOPMENT: Each individual phase of development as such phase is submitted for preliminary plat and/or final plat approval.

PLAT, FINAL: The drawing, map or plan of a subdivision or other tract of land, or a replatting of such, including certifications, descriptions and approvals and containing those elements and requirements set forth in subsection 8-21A-7C2d of this Article.

PLAT, PRELIMINARY: A preliminary plat of a subdivision containing the elements and requirements set forth in subsection 8-21A-7C2a through 8-21A-7C2c of this Article.

PRINCIPAL PERMITTED USE: The main use of land or a building as distinguished from a subordinate or accessory use.

PUBLIC AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT USES: Public and community support uses shall include, without limitation, community centers, post office facilities, churches, schools, public structures, recreational and health club facilities and day care facilities.

PUBLIC RIGHT OF WAY: A right of way open to the public.

PUBLIC STRUCTURE: Any structure designed for the benefit and use of the public.

PUBLIC UTILITY: Any person, entity or municipal department, duly authorized to furnish to the public under public regulation, electricity, gas, steam, telephone, transportation, water, cable television or other services.

PUBLIC UTILITY STRUCTURE: Any structure utilized by a public utility.

RANCH LOTS: See definition of Farm/Ranch Lots.

RECREATION FACILITY: A commercial or nonprofit swimming pool, park, fitness center, public gathering place or other use designed for amusement or recreation.

REGULAR LOTS: Lots as more particularly described in subsection 8-21A-5B4 of this Article.

RESTAURANT: Any building, or part thereof, other than a bed and breakfast establishment, where meals and/or beverages are provided for compensation, including, among others, such uses as cafe, cafeteria, coffee shop, lunchroom, tearoom, soda shop and dining room.

RETAIL STORE: A store which sells commodities in small quantities to consumers, such as a general store, hardware store, bookstore, etc.

ROAD: See definition of Street.

ROADSIDE STAND: A booth or stall temporarily located on a farm or other lot from which produce and farm products are sold to the general public.

ROOMERS OR BOARDERS: Persons paying remuneration for eating and sleeping within a residence.

RURAL LOTS: Lots as more particularly described in subsection 8-21A-5B2 of this Article.

SCHOOL, PUBLIC OR PRIVATE: An institution of learning either publicly or privately supported.

SERVICE STATION: A filling station or business enterprise using the premises primarily to sell and supply motor fuel and lubricating oils and grease to on premises trade, including the sale of tires, batteries, automotive accessories, together with other related services, including minor motor vehicle repair. May also include convenience retail use, not to include a drive-in establishment.

SETBACK: The space on a lot required to be left open, either by the front, side and rear yard requirements of this article, or by the delineation on a recorded plat map, or recorded covenants.

SHARED DRIVEWAYS: A twenty foot (20') wide private shared access that serves no less than two (2) nor more than four (4) single-family parcels or lots.

SIGN: Any structure or natural object, such as a tree, rock, bush and the ground itself, or part thereof or device attached thereto or painted or represented thereon, which shall be used to attract attention to any object, product, place, activity, person, institution, organization or business or which shall display or include any letter, word, model, banner, flag, pennant, insignia, device or representation used as, or which is in the nature of an announcement, direction or advertisement. For the purpose of this definition, the word "sign" does not include the flag, pennant or insignia of any nation, state, city or other political unit, or any political, educational, charitable, philanthropic, civic, professional, religious or like campaign, drive, movement or event.

SITE DISTURBANCE: Any change in the natural character of Hidden Springs as it exists at the date of adoption of this article, such as occurs during construction, landscaping, etc.

SKETCH PLAN: A less detailed development elaboration than a preliminary plat used in conjunction with a preapplication conference as described in subsection 8-21A-7B of this article. A sketch plan may include maps, charts, goals, objectives, policies and other information.

SLOPE: The number of feet rise or fall per one hundred feet (100') horizontal distance, divided by one hundred (100) and expressed as a percentage.

SOCIAL HALL: See definition of Club, Lodge Or Social Hall.

STABLE: A structure used or designed for the keeping, boarding, riding and/or care of horses.

STORAGE FACILITY OR STORAGE STRUCTURE: Any storage facility or structure used for the storage or parking (long term or short term) of, without limitation, vehicles, agricultural and recreational vehicles, boats and other watercraft, snowmobiles, equipment, and machinery.

STORY: That portion of a building included between the surface of any floor and the surface of the floor above it, or if there is no floor above, then the space between the floor and the ceiling next above it. Any portion of a story exceeding fourteen feet (14') in height shall be considered as an additional story for each fourteen feet (14') or fraction thereof. If the finished floor level directly above a basement or cellar is more than six feet (6') above grade, such basement or cellar shall be considered a story.

STREET: A public right of way officially accepted by the Ada County highway district or other appropriate government agency. The term "street" shall include "avenue", "drive", "circle", "road", "parkway", "boulevard", "highway", "thoroughfare" or any other similar term.

Street, Cul-De-Sac: A dead end street provided with a turnaround at its terminus.

Street, Island: A block in a subdivision located in the street.

Street, Major: A major street is a thoroughfare that is or will be used for fast and/or heavy traffic, when designated as such by the Ada County highway district or director.

Street, Private: Any parcel of land used for a street, road, lane or way or similar designation which is not maintained by, or dedicated to the Ada County highway district or other appropriate government agency, and used exclusively for the benefit of private individuals or associations.

STRUCTURAL ALTERATION: Any change in the structural members of a building, such as walls, columns, beams or girders.

STRUCTURE: Anything constructed, the use of which requires permanent location on the ground, or attachment to something having a permanent location on the ground, provided fences not exceeding forty eight inches (48") in height shall not be deemed a structure.

SUBDIVISION: A. Lot Or Parcel Division: The division of a lot or parcel of land into two (2) or more sublots or subparcels for the purpose of transfer of ownership, or for building development.

B. Exceptions: The following divisions of land shall not constitute a subdivision:

1. Parcel boundary adjustment as provided in this article.

2. A court decree dividing a lot or parcel of land into separate, distinct ownership in the distribution of property provided that such lot or parcel provides for proper access to streets as enunciated in this title.

3. The division of land as a result of condemnation, as defined and allowed in the Idaho Code.

4. The expansion or acquisition of street rights of way by a public agency, in compliance with an adopted general development plan.

5. A conveyance of raw land as contemplated in subsection 8-21A-4E of this article.

SURVEYOR, COUNTY: That licensed professional land surveyor appointed by the board to check plats and monuments for compliance with platting and surveying laws, provide for surveying monument records and make such surveys, descriptions, maps and plats as ordered by the board.

SWIMMING POOL: A receptacle for water or an artificial pool of water having a depth at any point of more than two feet (2') intended for the purpose of immersion or partial immersion therein of persons.

TAVERN OR LOUNGE: A building where alcoholic beverages are sold for consumption on the premises, not including restaurants.

TEMPORARY LIVING QUARTERS: See definition of Accessory Apartment Or Guesthouse.

TEMPORARY SALES OFFICE: That particular sales office(s), wherever located, used primarily for the wholesale or retail sales of property or lots located within Hidden Springs.

TOT LOTS: Any playground facility designed for use by children five (5) years of age and younger.

TOWNHOME LOTS: Lots as more particularly described in subsection 8-21A-5B6 of this article.

UNPLATTED PROPERTY USE: Those principal permitted and administrative permit uses described in subsection 8-21A-5C7 of this article.

USE: The purpose for which land or a building thereon is designated, arranged or intended, or for which it is occupied or maintained, let or leased.

UTILITIES: Facilities for service to, and used by the public.

VEHICLE: Every device in, upon or by which any person or property is or may be transported or drawn upon a public highway, excepting devices moved by human power or used exclusively upon stationary rails or tracks.

VILLAGE COMMERCIAL OVERLAY: Those areas depicted upon the Hidden Springs zoning map where village commercial uses, as detailed in subsection 8-21A-5C1 of this article, are permitted.

VILLAGE COMMERCIAL USE: Those principal permitted and administrative permit use village commercial uses described in subsection 8-21A-5C1 of this article.

VILLAGE HOME LOTS: Lots as more particularly described in subsection 8-21A-5B5 of this article.

WASTEWATER COLLECTION AND TREATMENT SYSTEM: An installation which collects and treats domestic wastewater and utilizes at a minimum subsurface disposal or effluent and which conforms to the rules, regulations and adopted plans of the health authority.

WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM: An approved water supply system which provides a domestic water supply meeting local, state and federal drinking water standards and fire flow requirements.

WILDLIFE AREA: An area specifically designated for wildlife and big game winter range. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 356, 5-13-1998; amd. Ord. 793, 12-7-2011)

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8-21A-3: PURPOSE AND INTENT:linklink

Generally, this article is enacted with the purpose and intent of promoting, on behalf of the Hidden Springs planned community, public health, safety, comfort and general welfare; to conserve and control the population density and to facilitate adequate and economical provisions for public improvements, all in accordance with the Hidden Springs specific plan for the desirable future physical development of Hidden Springs; and to provide a method of administration, all as authorized by the Ada County comprehensive plan, the Ada County zoning ordinance, the state legislature, and the constitution of the state.

Specifically, the purpose and intent of this article is to set forth the development standards and administrative procedures for implementing the land use policies of the Hidden Springs specific plan. Furthermore, it is the purpose of this article to:


A. Provide for the design of quality, mixed use development within the Hidden Springs planned community;


B. Provide distinctive, efficient and effective regulations to guide development in Hidden Springs;


C. Encourage flexibility and creativity in Hidden Springs' design and development in order to respond to market demand and site specific conditions while enhancing the economic viability and quality of Hidden Springs;


D. Encourage creative and innovative land planning and design processes throughout Hidden Springs which are sensitive to existing environmental conditions;


E. Provide for the integration and balance of a variety of uses in Hidden Springs;


F. Establish responsibility for the development of essential public services throughout Hidden Springs and the specific mechanisms by which they will be provided, created and financed;


G. Provide for phased and orderly development of Hidden Springs utilizing consistent criteria;


H. Provide flexibility for reconfiguration of residential and nonresidential uses and/or population density as long as these reconfigurations do not conflict with the overall intent of the Hidden Springs specific plan and this article;


I. Establish the permitted uses and minimum standards for each category of residential and nonresidential use;


J. Identify and define standards for uses which may occur in each of the land use categories;


K. Establish a review and approval process for the development of Hidden Springs. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

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8-21A-4: APPLICABILITY:linklink

This article governs the development and administration of the Hidden Springs planned community, as shown on the Hidden Springs zoning map and the Hidden Springs master land use plan. Where issues arise that are not covered under this article, or where this article specifically references other sections of this code, such other sections of this code shall apply and govern. This article shall not apply to any land not incorporated within the Hidden Springs planned community boundary.


A. Scope And Content: This article shall consist of the text hereof and the Hidden Springs zoning map1, identified herewith, which zoning map is now filed in the office of the recorder of Ada County and in the Ada County development services department. For the purpose of administration and enforcement, the zoning map in the Ada County development services department shall be considered as an official zoning map. Any and all amendments to the Hidden Springs zoning map shall be made concurrently on the zoning map in the Ada County development services department and made concurrently with the amendment being recorded with the Ada County recorder.

The approved Hidden Springs specific plan, as it may be amended, is now filed in the office of the Ada County development services department.


B. Flexibility: The development standards and design guidelines contained in the Hidden Springs specific plan, including, without limitation, the master land use plan, and this article are intended to depict the general nature and relative intensity of residential and nonresidential development in Hidden Springs, while allowing sufficient flexibility at the time of detailed planning and platting so that the overall goals and policies and purpose and intent of the Hidden Springs planned community can be achieved. The configuration and densities of development parcels and phases may be altered from those shown on the Hidden Springs master land use plan to accommodate market, financing, site and other conditions and revisions to the project's implementation strategy providing that the reconfiguration does not conflict with the zoning map, specific restrictions contained within subsection 8-21A-5E of this article, or the general intent of the Hidden Springs specific plan and this article. Residential uses and density may also be transferred between development parcels as depicted on the master land use plan providing this transfer does not conflict with the zoning map, specific restrictions contained within subsection 8-21A-5E of this article, or the general intent of the Hidden Springs specific plan and this article. The responsibility for such interpretation shall rest with the director.


C. Conflict Of Laws: In their interpretation and application, the provisions of this article shall be exclusive requirements under this code for development within Hidden Springs.


D. Codification: This article shall be codified in this code.


E. Phased Development: This article is intended to regulate all development and improvement of Hidden Springs, but is not intended to regulate the bulk sale and conveyance of raw land to subdevelopers. Subdevelopers intending to develop land within Hidden Springs, or any portion thereof, are subject to the Hidden Springs specific plan and this article.


F. Changes To Hidden Springs Property Boundary: From time to time, the Hidden Springs property boundary may change due to additions of property into, or transfer of property out of, the Hidden Springs planned community. To the extent any maps or figures contained within this article contain an outline of the boundary of the Hidden Springs planned community, such depiction shall be for illustrative purposes only.

Since the adoption of the maps and acreages set forth in this article, the county has approved the following applications adjusting the boundaries of the Hidden Springs planned community:

1. File no. 05-17-PBA (Forsythe property boundary adjustment).

2. Project no. 200700159-PBA (Rebecca Gillet property boundary adjustment).

3. Project no. 20070208-2C-ZOA-PBA (removing 23 acres from Hidden Springs planned community boundary and adding the acres to the Cartwright Ranch planned community). (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 697, 8-26-2008)

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8-21A-5: PERMITTED RESIDENTIAL AND NONRESIDENTIAL USES:linklink


A.Zoning:

1. Zoning Districts: For purposes of this Article, the Hidden Springs Planned Community is hereby divided into the following zoning districts and overlay districts as shown on the Zoning Map:

ZONING DISTRICTS  
  HS-R   Hidden Springs Residential Zone  
  HS-V   Hidden Springs Village Zone  
OVERLAY DISTRICTS  
  HS-VC   Hidden Springs Village Commercial  
  HS-AC   Hidden Springs Agricultural Commercial  
  HS-EC   Hidden Springs Employment Center  

2. Allowed Uses Within Zoning Districts: Within the zoningdistricts and overlay districts described above, the following uses shall be allowed: (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

a. Hidden Springs Residential Zone (HS-R) Allowed Uses:

(1) Farm/ranch lots

(See subsection 8-21A-5B1)

(2) Rural lots

(See subsection 8-21A-5B2)

(3) Large lots

(See subsection 8-21A-5B3)

(4) Regular lots

(See subsection 8-21A-5B4)

(5) Village home lots

(See subsection 8-21A-5B5)

(6) Town home lots

(See subsection 8-21A-5B6)

(7) Equestrian center

(See subsection 8-21A-5C4)

(8) Open space/parks

(See subsection 8-21A-5C5)

(9) Unplatted property use

(See subsection 8-21A-5C7)

(10) Community event, private and public

(See subsection 8-21A-7G)

(11) Essential public services

(See subsection 8-21A-2)

b. Hidden Springs Village Zone (HS-V) Allowed Uses:

(1) Regular lots

(See subsection 8-21A-5B4)

(2) Village home lots

(See subsection 8-21A-5B5)

(3) Town home lots

(See subsection 8-21A-5B6)

(4) Community center/school

(See subsection 8-21A-5C3)

(5) Open space/parks

(See subsection 8-21A-5C5)

(6) Unplatted property use

(See subsection 8-21A-5C7)

(7) Community event, private and public

(See subsection 8-21A-7G)

(8) Essential public services

(See subsection 8-21A-2)


    (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 356, 5-13-1998)

c. Hidden Springs Village Commercial Overlay (HS-VC) Allowed Uses: Those uses allowed pursuant to subsection 8-21A-5C1 of this Section.

d. Hidden Springs Agricultural Commercial Overlay (HS-AC) Allowed Uses: Those uses allowed pursuant to subsection 8-21A-5C2 of this Section.

e. Hidden Springs Employment Center Overlay (HS-EC) Allowed Uses:Those uses allowed pursuant to subsection 8-21A-5C6 of this Section and approved pursuant to the requirements of subsection 8-21A-7G of this Article.

3. Purpose Of Zoning Map And Master Land Use Plan: While the Zoning Map depicts the zoning districts' and overlay districts' boundaries within Hidden Springs, the Master Land Use Plan contained within the Specific Plan depicts the general nature and relative intensity of residential and nonresidential development and uses within these zoning districts and overlay districts subject to the appropriate flexibility and other standards discussed in subsection 8-21A-4B and elsewhere in this Article.


B. Residential Uses: The following is a detailed description of all residential lots, including their principal permitted uses, accessory uses, administrative permit uses, prohibited uses, characteristics, standards and special conditions.

1. Farm/Ranch Lots:



Plan view illustrative of farm/ranch lots.


a. Description: Farm/ranch lots are "agricultural style" lots adjacent to the agricultural operations or open space in the most visible portions of the Dry Creek Valley and adjoining hillsides. The lots are intended to provide unique residential experiences in conjunction with carefully controlled agricultural operations.

b. Principal Permitted Uses:

Agricultural operations (farming, grazing and/or gardening) as defined herein.

Family daycare home.

Parks.

School.

Single-family dwellings of a permanent nature and their accessory structures.

Temporary sales offices and model homes.

c. Accessory Uses:

Accessory apartment (maximum 1 unit).

Agricultural outbuildings.

Freestanding garages or storage structures.

Home occupations.

Roomers or boarders with a resident family (not more than 2).

Swimming pools and tennis courts. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

d. Uses Requiring An Administrative Permit:

Bed and breakfast establishments.

Clubs, lodges and social halls.

Nurseries, grain storage facilities and related agricultural structures.

Public structures.

Public utility structures.

Roadside stands that sell agricultural products produced within the project.

Shop for repair of personal machinery, equipment and vehicles used for agricultural purposes. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 356, 5-13-1998)

e. Prohibited Uses:

All uses not specifically identified. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

f. Lot Characteristics:

(1) Dimensions:

Minimum lot size: 1.5 acres.

Minimum lot depth: 150 feet.

Minimum lot width: 150 feet.

Minimum lot frontage: 100 feet (50 feet for flag lots).

(2) Setbacks:

Front yard setback: 30 feet.

Side yard setback: 3 feet minimum from lot line. For corner lots, minimum side yard setback from corner lot line shall be 23 feet.

Rear yard setback: 30 feet or 10 feet for garage.

(3) Buildings:

Maximum building height: 35 feet.

Maximum building coverage: 15 percent of lot. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 490, 4-9-2003)

g. Special Conditions:

(1) Building Envelopes: Shall be designated on every farm/ranch lot. All site disturbance (construction of buildings, site work, etc.) shall be contained within this envelope.

(2) Garages: Shall be screened and/or not prominent or highly visible from adjoining street.

(3) Houses And Accessory Structures: Shall be sited to minimize grading and shall be compatible with existing topography. Site grading is limited to building envelopes or the area within lot setbacks, whichever is more constraining.

(4) Building Massing: Shall step with the natural grade to minimize exposed building facade on the "downhill" portion of the lot to two (2) stories plus roof. The "downhill" portion may be either street side or rear of the lot.

(5) Floodplain: Significant portions of the farm lots located along the valley floor fall within the 100-year floodplain. Development of these lots shall comply with all FEMA and local floodplain regulations.

(6) Roadway: Farm/ranch lots fronting on Dry Creek Road or Cartwright Road shall set back buildings as far as possible from these main roadways. Additional techniques such as shared driveways, meandering driveways, rear entry garages, agricultural style buildings, barns, etc., shall be employed to maintain rural character along these roadways.



Typical farm/ranch lot layout.






Typical farm lot in valley at Dry Creek.





Typical ranch lots on hillside.


2. Rural Lots:




Plan view illustrative of rural lots.


a. Description: Rural lots are large lots intended to provide a transition from farm lots to the village homes in the village center. They also provide a large lot buffer between the village center and larger residential lots and agricultural uses which adjoin the project site. These lots are intended to provide a high degree of flexibility in transitioning from farm to village character.

b. Principal Permitted Uses:

Family daycare home.

Parks.

School.

Single-family dwellings of a permanent nature and their accessory structures.

Temporary sales offices and model homes.

c. Accessory Uses:

Accessory apartment (maximum 1 unit).

Freestanding garages or storage structures.

Hobby greenhouses.

Home occupations.

Roomers or boarders with a resident family (not more than 2).

Swimming pools and tennis courts.

d. Uses Requiring An Administrative Permit:

Bed and breakfast establishments.

Clubs, lodges and social halls.

Public structures.

Public utility structures.

Roadside stands offering agricultural products produced within the project.

e. Prohibited Uses:

All uses not specifically identified. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

f. Lot Characteristics:

(1) Dimensions:

Minimum lot size: 1.5 acres.

Minimum lot depth: 150 feet.

Minimum lot width: 150 feet.

Minimum lot frontage: 100 feet (50 feet for flag lots).

(2) Setbacks:

Front yard setback: 30 feet.

Side yard setback: 3 feet minimum from lot line. For corner lots, minimum side yard setback from corner lot line shall be 23 feet.

Rear yard setback: 30 feet or 10 feet for garage.

(3) Buildings:

Maximum building height: 35 feet.

Maximum building coverage: 15 percent of lot. (Ord.325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 490, 4-9-2003)

g. Special Conditions:

(1) Building Envelopes: Shall be designated on every rural lot. All site disturbance (construction of buildings, site work, etc.) shall be contained within this envelope.

(2) Garages: Shall be screened and/or not prominent or highly visible from adjoining street.

(3) Houses And Accessory Structures: Shall be sited to minimize grading and shall be compatible with existing topography. Site grading is limited to building envelopes or the area within lot setbacks, whichever is more constraining.

(4) Twenty Foot Build To Street Edge: Rural lots fronting on Dry Creek Road or Seaman's Gulch Road are intended to provide a smooth transition from farm lots to village homes. Rural lots which directly front onto these main roads shall have their primary residential building located within five feet (5') of the front yard setback line to begin to establish the street "edge" near the village center. Rural lots away from the village center and/or off these main streets shall be set back farther and utilize techniques such as shared driveways, meandering driveways, rear entry garages, agricultural style buildings, barns, etc., to maintain rural character.




Typical rural lot layout.





Rural lot near town center on Seaman's Gulch Road.





Rural lot behind village lots.



3. Large Lots:




Plan view illustrative of large lots.


a. Description: Large lots are spacious lots generally intended to be developed on the moderately sloped hillsides within theproject site. These lots vary in size and tend to be irregular in configuration in order to minimize visual impact and conform to existing topography.

b. Principal Permitted Uses:

Family daycare home.

Parks.

Schools.

Single-family dwellings of a permanent nature and their accessory structures.

Temporary sales offices and model homes.

c. Accessory Uses:

Accessory apartment (maximum 1 unit).

Freestanding garages or storage structures.

Hobby greenhouses.

Home occupations.

Roomers or boarders with a resident family (not more than 2).

Swimming pools and tennis courts.

d. Uses Requiring An Administrative Permit:

Agricultural operations.

Bed and breakfast establishments.

Health club facilities.

Public structures.

Public utility structures.

Roadside stands.

e. Prohibited Uses:

All uses not specifically identified. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

f. Lot Characteristics:

(1) Dimensions:

Minimum lot size: 1/2 acre.

Minimum lot depth: 120 feet.

Minimum lot width: 100 feet.

Minimum lot frontage: 50 feet (30 feet for flag lots).

(2) Setbacks:

Front yard setback: 20 feet.

Side yard setback: 3 feet minimum from lot line. For corner lots, minimum side yard setback from corner lot line shall be 18 feet.

Rear yard setback: 20 feet or 10 feet for garage.

(3) Buildings:

Maximum building height: 35 feet.

Maximum building coverage: 30 percent of lot. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 490, 4-9-2003)

g. Special Conditions:

(1) Building Envelopes: Shall be designated on every large lot. All site disturbance (construction of buildings, site work, etc.) shall be contained within this envelope.

(2) Garages: Shall be side or rear entry. Garage doors shall not directly face the street.

(3) Houses And Accessory Structures: Shall be sited to minimize grading and shall be compatible with existing topography. Site grading is limited to building envelopes or the area within lot setbacks, whichever is more constraining.

(4) Sloped Banks: Facing the street shall not exceed a three to one (3:1) gradient. Slopes shall not exceed seven feet (7') in height without a horizontal terrace of a minimum depth of five feet (5').

(5) Building Massing: Shall step with the natural grade to minimize exposed building facade on the "downhill" portion of the lot to two (2) stories plus roof. The "downhill" portion may be either street side or rear of the lot.




Typical large lot layout.






Grading at hillside lot.

(Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

4. Regular Lots:




Plan view illustrative of regular lots.


a. Description: Regular lots are generally intended to be developed in the relatively flat "coves" and "side valleys" which are not as visible as the main floor of Dry Creek Valley. These lots offer a more typical residential site size and configuration to meet the portion of the market which may not be attracted tothe more unique lot types offered elsewhere in the project.

b. Principal Permitted Uses:

Family daycare home.

Parks.

Schools.

Single-family dwellings of a permanent nature and accessory structures.

Temporary sales office and model homes.

c. Accessory Uses:

Accessory apartment (maximum 1 unit).

Freestanding garages or storage structures.

Hobby greenhouses.

Home occupations.

Roomers or boarders with a resident family (not more than 2).

Swimming pools and tennis courts.

d. Uses Requiring An Administrative Permit:

Agricultural operations.

Bed and breakfast establishments.

Health club facilities.

Public structures.

Public utility structures.

e. Prohibited Uses:

All uses not specifically identified above. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 724, 3-11-2009)

f. Lot Characteristics:

(1) Dimensions:

Minimum lot size: 12,000 square feet.

Minimum lot depth: 120 feet.

Minimum lot width: 100 feet.

Minimum lot frontage: 50 feet (30 feet for flag lots).

(2) Setbacks:

Front yard setback: 20 feet. For side entry garages, minimum front setback is 10 feet.

Side yard setback: 3 feet minimum from lot line. For corner lots, minimum side yard setback from corner lot line shall be 18 feet.

Rear yard setback: 20 feet or 10 feet for garage.

(3) Buildings:

Maximum building height: 35 feet.

Maximum building coverage: 45 percent of lot. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 490, 4-9-2003; amd. Ord. 724, 3-11-2009)

g. Special Conditions:

(1) Garages: Side or rear entry garages are encouraged where lot widths and depths permit. To encourage side entry garages, the front setback is ten feet (10') from the front property line. Where garage doors directly face the street, efforts shall be made to minimize their visual impact with architectural or site treatments.

(2) Houses And Accessory Structures: Shall be sited to minimize grading and shall be compatible with existing topography. Site grading is limited to building envelopes or the area within lot setbacks, whichever is more constraining.

(3) Building Massing: Shall step with the natural grade to minimize exposed building facade on the "downhill" portion of the lot to two (2) stories plus roof. The "downhill" portion may be either street side or rear of the lot.

(4) Clustering: Wherever site and access conditions permit clustering of buildings, garages and drives are encouraged to minimize site disruption and maximize open space. Clustering techniques may include shared driveways, key or flag lots, eyebrow cul-de-sacs, etc.




Typical regular lot.





Clustering examples.


(Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd Ord. 724, 3-11-2009)

5. Village Homes:




Plan view illustrative of village lots.



a. Description: Village home lots are smaller rural lots that are reminiscent of the "in town" lots traditionally found in Idaho's agricultural towns and villages. They are intended to provide a close knit residential village with strong pedestrian and community orientation that is found in some of the great older neighborhoods of Boise (such as the North End).

b. Principal Permitted Uses:

Family daycare home.

Parks.

Schools.

Single-family dwellings of a permanent nature and their accessory structures, including condominiums.

Temporary sales offices and model homes.

Townhomes (as defined in subsection B6 of this section).

c. Accessory Uses:

Accessory apartment (maximum 1 unit).

Freestanding garages or storage structures.

Home occupations.

Roomers or boarders with a resident family (not more than 2).

Swimming pools.

Tennis courts.

d. Uses Requiring An Administrative Permit:

Agricultural operations.

Bed and breakfast establishments.

Health club facilities.

Public structures.

Public utility structures.

Roadside stand.

e. Prohibited Uses:

All uses not specifically identified. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

f. Lot Characteristics:

(1) Dimensions:

Minimum lot size: 3,200 square feet.

Minimum lot depth: 80 feet.

Minimum lot width: 40 feet (60 feet typical).

Minimum lot frontage: 30 feet.

(2) Setbacks:

Front yard setback: 10 feet.

Side yard setback: 3 feet minimum from lot line. For corner lots, minimum side yard setback from corner lot line shall be 13 feet.

Rear yard setback: 10 feet (0 feet for garage, accessory or storage structure).

(3) Buildings:

Maximum building height: 40 feet.

Maximum building coverage: 70 percent of lot. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 490, 4-9-2003)

g. Special Conditions:

(1) Garages: Rear entry garages off alleys or front entry garage structures located behind the main residential building are encouraged.

(2) Front Porches: Village homes are encouraged to provide usable front porches along the majority of their street side facades. These porches should receive special architectural treatment and be of sufficient depth and width to encourage use as an outdoor living space.




Typical village lot layout.





Develop 10' build-to -street edge.






Garages shall be accessed from rear of lot.


6. Town Homes:




Plan view illustrative of town homes.


a. Description: Town home lots are the densest residential product envisioned at Hidden Springs. The town home lots are generally intended to provide an alternative, attached-style unit which may appeal to seniors, empty-nesters, first-time buyers, and single parents who prefer an attached product with limited yard area. Town home lots are intended to be located in or within convenient walking distance of the town center.

b. Principal Permitted Uses:

Single-family dwellings of a permanent nature and their accessory structures, including condominiums.

Duplex and multi-family dwellings of a permanent nature and their accessory structures, including condominiums.

Temporary sales offices and model homes or units.

Family day care home.

Parks.

Schools.

Village homes (as defined in subsection 8-21A-5B5 of this Section).

c. Accessory Uses:

Home occupations.

Freestanding garages or storage structures.

Temporary living quarters.

Fitness and health facilities (for use by town home residents).

Parking area or lot.

d. Uses Requiring An Administrative Permit:

Public utility structures.

Public structures.

Bed and breakfast establishments.

Individual swimming pools and tennis courts.

Clubs, lodges and social halls.

Agricultural operations.

e. Prohibited Uses:

All uses not specifically identified above.

f. Lot Characteristics:

(1) Dimensions:

(A) Single-Family:

Minimum Lot Size: 1,200 square feet.

Minimum Lot Depth: 60 feet.

Minimum Lot Width: 20 feet.

Minimum Lot Frontage: 20 feet.

(2) Setbacks:

Front Yard Setback: 10 feet.

Side Yard Setback: 0 feet minimum from lot line with 10 feet minimum separation from adjoining buildings. For corner lots, minimum side yard setback from corner lot line shall be 13 feet.

Rear Yard Setback: 10 feet (0 feet for garage, accessory or storage structure with alley).

(3) Buildings:

Maximum Building Height: 40 feet.

Maximum Coverage: 85 percent.

Maximum Units Per Building: 12.

Parking: 2 spaces per unit (includes garage spaces).

g. Special Conditions:

(1) Multi-Family Or Attached Home Density: Shall be 16 DU/acre maximum.

(2) Buildings: Shall respect existing drainage patterns. Building massing must step with the natural grade.

(3) Surface Parking Areas: Shall be landscaped and terraced with the natural grade.

(4) Landscaped Outdoor Common Areas: Shall be incorporated into the site plan.

(5) Ground Floor Units: Are encouraged to have patios to provide a private outdoor space. Upper floor units are encouraged to have porches or balconies.

(6) Garages: Are encouraged to be incorporated into the building massing.




Typical town home lot layout.





Step buildings with natural grade.





Incorporate garage into building massing.



C. Nonresidential Uses: The following is a detailed description of all nonresidential uses including principal permitted uses, administrative permit uses, accessory uses, prohibited uses,characteristics, standards and special conditions. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

1. Village Commercial:




Plan view illustrative of Village Commercial Overlay Zone.


(Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 356, 5-13-1998)

a. Description: The Village Commercial Overlay is generally intended to provide for neighborhood businesses that are compatible with the adjoining village home residential uses, and service the residents of Hidden Springs, Dry Creek Valley, and other nearby areas. The total cumulative commercial development in the Village Commercial Overlay shall not exceed fifty thousand (50,000) GSF of interior building area, (excluding public and community support uses), and only shall occur in the Hidden Springs Village Commercial Overlay (HS-VC) District. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

b. Principal Permitted Uses:

Bank branch offices (including automated tellers) excluding drive-thru service.

Clinics (medical or dental).

Dry cleaning and laundering facility (provided actual dry cleaning is done off-site).

Offices (business, professional, real estate, etc.).

Personal service retail.

Restaurants, cafes, confectioneries or soda fountains (excluding drive-in establishments).

Retail stores, (including general stores, hardware stores, bookstores, etc.).

Guest houses and bed and breakfast establishments.

Fire protection, law enforcement and emergency medical facilities.

Group day care facility.

Public or private parking area or lot.

Park and ride facility.

Health club facility.

Parks.

Storage facilities or storage structures. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 356, 5-13-1998)

c. Uses Requiring An Administrative Permit:

Any commercial or retail use compatible with principal permitted uses.

Clubs, lodges or social halls.

Places of public worship.

Service stations.

Taverns.

Public utility structures.

Public structures.

Roadside stand.

d. Prohibited Uses: All nonresidential uses not specifically identified.

e. Minimum Standards:

(1) Dimensions:

Minimum Lot Size: 3,200 square feet.

Minimum Lot Depth: 80 feet.

Minimum Lot Width: 40 feet.

(2) Setbacks:

Front Yard Setback: 0 feet.

Side Yard Setback: 0 to adjoining commercial, 10 feet to adjoining residential, 10 feet for corner lots.

Rear Yard Setback: 10 feet (0 feet for freestanding garage or storage structure with alley).

(3) Buildings:

Maximum Building Height: 40 feet (not including vertical elements of less than 100 square feet for community use facilities).

Maximum Building Coverage: 85% of lot.

Buildings may be developed as commercial condominiums.

f. Special Conditions:

(1) Parking: For village commercial uses shall be provided on-street or in rear yards adjacent to or behind the commercial buildings. Parking for the first one thousand (1,000) square feet of interior building area is assumed to be accommodated on-street within the village center, and off-street parking beyond the first one thousand (1,000) square feet of interior building area shall be provided at a minimum of one space per one thousand (1,000) square feet of interior building area. No front yard parking will be permitted.

(2) Loading Facilities: For commercial uses shall be thoroughly screened and buffered from adjoining residential uses.

(3) Village Commercial Buildings: Shall receive special architectural treatments to make them residential in scale, mass and design and thus compatible with adjoining residential uses.




Typical village commercial lot layout.





Typical building and parking layout.

(Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

2. Agricultural Commercial:




Plan view illustrative of Agricultural Commercial Overlay Zone.


a. Description: The Agricultural Commercial Overlay is generallyintended to provide for agriculturally oriented and other businesses that are compatible with adjoining residential and agricultural land uses, and service the residents of Hidden Springs, Dry Creek Valley, as well as those of nearby areas. The total cumulative commercial development in the Agricultural Commercial Overlay shall not exceed fifty thousand (50,000) GSF of interior building area, (excluding public and community support uses) and shall only occur in the Hidden Springs Agricultural Commercial (HS-AC) District.

b. Principal Permitted Uses:

Agricultural operations, including agricultural outbuildings.

Roadside stands offering for sale agricultural products.

Farm machinery sales (excluding repair).

Feed, seed, and fertilizer stores.

Other agriculturally related retail stores (including farm apparel, etc.).

Retail store.

Animal clinics and veterinary offices.

Offices.

Guest houses and bed and breakfast establishments.

Group day care facility.

Community centers.

Schools.

Parks.

Health club facilities.

Park and ride facility.

Public or private parking area.

Temporary sales offices.

Temporary construction facilities.

c. Uses Requiring An Administrative Permit:

Any commercial or retail use compatible with the principal permitted uses.

Commercial greenhouses, nurseries.

Grain storage structures.

Places of public worship.

Clubs, lodges or social halls.

Public utility structures.

Public structures.

Fire protection, law enforcement and emergency medical facilities.

Storage facilities or storage structures. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 356, 5-13-1998)

d. Prohibited Uses:

All uses not specifically identified.

e. Minimum Standards:

(1) Dimensions:

Minimum Lot Size: 1/2 acre.

Minimum Lot Depth: 120 feet.

Minimum Lot Width: 100 feet.

(2) Setbacks:

Front Yard Setback: 20 feet.

Side Yard Setback: 20 feet minimum from lot line. For corner lots, minimum side yard setback from corner lot line shall be 30 feet.

Rear Yard Setback: 20 feet.

(3) Buildings:

Maximum Building Height: 45 feet.

Maximum Building Coverage: 30% of lot.

f. Special Conditions:

(1) Building Envelopes: Shall be designated on all rural and farm lots underlying the Agricultural Commercial Overlay. Commercial buildings must be located within this envelope. Additional site disturbance shall be contained within this envelope except for a maximum of five thousand (5,000) square feet of additional disturbance which is permitted contiguous to, but outside thebuilding envelope to accommodate parking for commercial uses.

(2) Parking: For agricultural commercial uses shall be provided either to the side or rear of commercial buildings. Parking for the first one thousand (1,000) square feet of interior building area is assumed to be accommodated on-street within the village center, and off-street parking beyond the first one thousand (1,000) square feet of interior building area shall be provided at a minimum of one space per one thousand (1,000) square feet of interior building area. No front yard parking will be permitted.

(3) Loading Facilities: For commercial uses shall be thoroughly screened and buffered from adjoining residential uses.

(4) Architectural Treatments: Agricultural commercial uses near the town center shall receive architectural treatments that make them residential in scale, mass, and design, and compatible with adjoining residential uses.




Typical agricultural commercial lot layout.





Screen loading facilities and parking from adjoining residential uses.


3. Community Center/School:




Plan view illustrative of community center.


a. Description: The community center is generally intended to include the recreational and community service uses that will form the social hub of the community and shall only occur in the Hidden Springs Village Zone (HS-V).

b. Principal Permitted Uses:

Public and private schools and accessory structures.

Community center/meeting hall and accessory structures.

Recreation facility and accessory structures.

Indoor and outdoor swimming pools and spas, and accessory structures.

Tennis courts.

Playfields and playgrounds/tot lots.

Golf practice/putting facilities.

Clubs, lodges or social halls.

Group day care facility.

Health club facilities.

Park and ride facilities.

Public and private parking area.

c. Uses Requiring An Administrative Permit:

Places of public worship.

Restaurants and cafes.

Public utility structures.

Public structures.

Agricultural operations.

d. Prohibited Uses:

All uses not specifically identified above.

e. Minimum Standards:

(1) Dimensions:

Minimum Lot Size: 1.5 acres.

Minimum Lot Depth: 150 feet.

Minimum Lot Width: 150 feet.

(2) Setbacks:

Front Yard Setback: 20 feet.

Side Yard Setback: 20 feet minimum. For corner lots, minimum side yard setback from corner lot line shall be 30 feet.

Rear Yard Setback: 20 feet.

(3) Buildings:

Maximum Building Height: 45 feet.

Maximum Building Coverage: 50% of lot.

f. Special Conditions:

(1) Parking: Parking for the first one thousand (1,000) square feet of indoor use area is assumed to be accommodated on-street within the village center, and off-street parking beyond the first one thousand (1,000) square feet of interior building area shall be provided at a minimum of one space per one thousand (1,000) square feet of interior building area.

(2) Loading Facilities: For the community center shall be thoroughly screened and buffered from adjoining residential uses.

(3) Building Massing: Is encouraged to be broken into a complex of smaller structures that are compatible in relative scale and size with adjoining residential uses.




Community center lot layout.





Screen parking from adjacent uses.


4. Equestrian Center:




Plan view illustrative of equestrian center.


a. Description: The equestrian center is generally intended to include equestrian uses and facilities to serve residents of the project who own and wish to board horses. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

b. Principal Permitted Uses:

Animal clinic or veterinary office.

Commercial stable and riding arena.

Equestrian-related retail store.

Office(s) and residence for operator/caretaker of equestrian facilities.

Paddocks, pastures, and corrals.

Public and private parking area.

Restaurant, cafe. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 582, 5-25-2005)

c. Uses Requiring An Administrative Permit:

Agricultural operations.

Clubs, lodges, or social halls.

Public structures.

Public utility structures.

Storage structures.

Tavern.

d. Prohibited Uses:

All uses not specifically identified above.

e. Minimum Standards:

Minimum Lot Size: 2 acres.

Minimum Lot Depth: None.

Minimum Lot Width: None.

Building setback: 30 feet from property or parcel boundary. 10 feet between paddock or corral fencing and property or parcel boundary.

Maximum Building Height: 45 feet with a special tower element of less than 100 square feet permitted to maximum of 50 feet.

Maximum Building Coverage: 10% of lot.

Parking Requirements: One off-street space for every four horses boarded on site; one space per on-duty employee/caretaker.

f. Special Conditions:

Building shall be sited with respect to existing drainage patterns.

Building massing and pastures shall step with the natural grade.

Service, loading and maintenance facilities shall be completely screened from roads and residents.




Equestrian center lot layout.


5. Open Space And Parks:




Plan view illustrative of community park.


a. Description: Areas within the project designated as open space areas or parks are intended to provide both active and passive recreational opportunities as well as educational facilities, agricultural and wildlife areas. Open space areas include neighborhood and community parks, the Hidden Springs Greenway, the project-wide trail system, designated wildlife areas, and the agricultural conservation area in the valley floor.

b. Principal Permitted Uses:

A recreational facility (in a community park only) including a maximum of 2,500 square feet pavilion-type space.

Park structures, gazebos, restrooms, and concession facilities.

Playfields and playgrounds, tot lots, tennis courts, swimming pools, etc.

Trails (pedestrian, bike and equestrian).

Agricultural outbuildings.

Agricultural operations (farming, grazing and/or gardens).

Schools, public or private.

Park and ride facility.

Public parking area (associated with open space or park use). (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

c. Uses Requiring An Administrative Permit:

Public utility structures. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 356, 5-13-1998)

d. Prohibited Uses:

All uses not specifically identified. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

e. Uses Requiring An Administrative Permit (which may only occur in the Agricultural Conservation Area):

Nurseries. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 356, 5-13-1998)

f. Minimum Standards:

Setback For Buildings/Fields/Play Equipment From All Lot Lines: 10 feet.

Maximum Building Height: 35 feet with special vertical element or landmark of less than 100 square feet (footprint) permitted to exceed 60 feet.

Parking: None shall be required for park or open space areas; parking for other principal permitted uses or administrative permit uses shall be in accordance with this Title. Parking areas may serve multiple or joint uses while satisfying the parking requirements for only one of the multiple or joint uses in question.

g. Special Conditions:

Trails and play fields shall be sited with respect to existing drainage patterns.

Service and maintenance facilities shall be completely screened from adjacent uses.

Site lighting shall be low intensity and utilize cut-off luminaires to minimize glare and impacts to surrounding residential areas.





Trails with respect to existing drainage.





Use of cut-off luminaires in site lighting.


6. Employment Centers:




Plan view of potential employment center sites.


a. Description: The employment center overlay is intended to accommodate commercial, office and institutional uses which may be incorporated into one or more of four (4) relatively "hidden" side valleys or coves within the project site for the purpose of providing employment for residents of Hidden Springs and nearby areas and shall only occur in the Hidden springs employment center overlay (HS-EC) district. All principal permitted uses set forth below shall be subject to the employment center approval process in subsection 8-21A-7G of this article.

b. Principal Permitted Uses:

Any use or building incidental to the employment centeruse that does not alter the overall character of the project.

Convalescent home.

Health club facility.

High technology corporate headquarters and research facilities.

Parking structures and covered parking.

Parks.

Private and public parking area.

Public structures.

Public utility structures.

Spas and health retreats.

University related research centers and cultural facilities.

Other similar uses which are relatively self-contained and low in development intensity yet provide employment opportunities.

c. Prohibited Uses:

Any use which does not meet the compatibility criteria described in subsection 8-21A-7G of this article. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

d. Minimum Standards:

(1) Density:

Maximum density: 0.30 FAR.

Maximum building coverage: 30 percent of lot.

Minimum open space: 30 percent of lot.

(2) Setbacks:

Front yard setback: 50 feet (10 feet for parking).

Side yard setback: 20 feet.

Rear yard setback: 0 feet.

(3) Buildings:

Maximum building height: 45 feet.

Maximum interior building area building: 50,000 square feet.

(4) Parking:

Minimum of 1 space per 1,000 square feet of interior building area. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 490, 4-9-2003)

e. Special Conditions:

Building envelopes shall be designated for all employment center uses and all buildings. Parking and site disturbance shall be contained within this envelope.

Building should be sited with respect for existing site drainage patterns.

Building massing shall step with natural grade.

Surface parking areas should be terraced with natural grade and landscape screened from view of adjacent residents.

Service and loading facilities shall be screened from view of adjacent residents. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

7. Unplatted Property:

a. Description: The unplatted property within Hidden Springs is that property which has not been platted. This area is intended to be used for its historic agricultural and other uses, as well as certain other uses which are in furtherance of the agricultural operations and goals and objectives of the Hidden Springs specific plan. It is the ultimate intent that all property within Hidden Springs be platted. Notwithstanding chapter 2, article E of this title, any improvements associated with the uses specified below may be developed and constructed on any unplatted property within Hidden Springs. All uses of the unplatted property shall be consistent with this article and the specific plan.

b. Principal Permitted Uses:

Agricultural operations (farming, grazing and/or gardens).

Agricultural outbuildings and crop storage facilities.

Community events (public or private).

Essential public services.

Public utility structures.

Temporary construction facilities.

Temporary sales offices.

Trails (pedestrian, bike, and equestrian).

c. Uses Requiring An Administrative Permit:

Playfields and playgrounds.

Schools.

d. Uses Requiring An Administrative Permit (Which May Only Occur In The Agricultural Conservation Area):

Nurseries.

e. Prohibited Uses: All uses not specifically identified. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 356, 5-13-1998)


D. Land Use Summary Table: Figure 8-21A-5D (land use summary table) of this section is a summary of all residential and nonresidential uses and characteristics within the Hidden Springs planned community, including, principal permitted uses, accessory uses, administrative permit uses, prohibited uses, and lot characteristics.

(fold-out table goes here)

E. Specific Restrictions For The Phased Development Of Hidden Springs:

1. Total residential units shall not exceed one thousand thirty five (1,035), excluding accessory use or employment center uses.

2. Total village commercial use shall not exceed fifty thousand (50,000) gross square feet of interior building area, not including public and community support uses;

3. Total agricultural commercial use shall not exceed fifty thousand (50,000) gross square feet of interior building area not including public and community support uses;

4. The open space area depicted on the Hidden Springs master land use plan shall remain open and free of development other than wildlife habitat improvements, trails, and other recreational improvements, agriculture, and agricultural operations and outbuildings; provided however, that minor changes in the boundaries of the open space areas are acceptable as long as the total acreage of the open space areas does not decrease below eight hundred ten (810) acres.

The director shall be responsible for monitoring compliance with the foregoing specific restrictions. The director shall develop and maintain a mechanism to ensure compliance with the specific restrictions set forth above. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999)

http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165650
8-21A-6: DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN GUIDELINES:linklink

The specific development and design guidelines approved as a part of the Hidden Springs specific plan are incorporated herein by this reference. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165651
8-21A-7: ADMINISTRATIVE/OTHER REGULATIONS:linklink


A. Intent: The review and approval process established hereunder for the development of Hidden Springs planned community embodies the intent of the Hidden Springs specific plan and the Ada County zoning ordinance.

It shall be the duty of the director to administer the provisions of this article for the development of Hidden Springs. The director shall have the authority to interpret the provisions of this article and make decisions on land use issues not specifically addressed by the Hidden Springs specific plan and/or this article.

No phase of Hidden Springs shall be approved unless essential public services for such phase, as specified in the Hidden Springs specific plan and this article, are provided to support the phase as it proceeds.

The director, commission, and/or board, as the case may be, shall base their approvals or disapprovals upon compliance with the provisions of this article and the goals and policies and purpose and intent of the Hidden Springs specific plan.


B. Preapplication Conference: Any applicant seeking plat, accessory use, administrative permit use or employment center use approval, or any other application required pursuant to this article may request a preapplication conference with the director to clarify the requirements, standards and policies identified in this article. The preapplication conference should be held as soon as is practicable after the request by the applicant. At this conference, the applicant may present sketch plans describing the general nature and intent of their proposed development. The purpose of the preapplication meeting is to determine whether the applicant's proposed development is consistent with the intent of this article. If deemed consistent, the applicant may proceed directly with preparation and submittal of an application. If the proposed development is deemed not clearly consistent or if significant issues are raised, the director shall identify such issues in writing within ten (10) days of the conference and shall encourage the applicant to submit revised sketch plans and schedule another preapplication conference prior to formal submittal of an application. The director shall furnish written comments and recommendations to assist the applicant in preparing the next submittal. The submission, review, and the director's written comments and recommendations of any plat, accessory use, administrative permit use or employment center use shall in no way be interpreted as official approval or to mean that such review satisfies the requirements of the submission of a preliminary plat or approval of any other application. The director's written comments and recommendations shall be nonbinding on the decision made by the director, commission and/or board.


C. Hidden Springs Subdivision Procedures:

1. Preliminary Plat And Final Plat Procedures: These regulations are adopted for the purpose of protecting property and furthering the health, safety and general welfare of the people of Hidden Springs, and to provide uniform standards for the subdivision of land. Subject to subsection 8-21A-4E of this article, these regulations shall apply to the subdivision of all land within Hidden Springs. It shall be unlawful hereafter to make a subdivision of land, as defined by this article, or any part thereof, until plans therefor are submitted to the director and recommended by the commission and approved by the board.

a. Procedure For Preliminary Plat Approval By The Commission: Applications for a preliminary plat shall comply with the Hidden Springs specific plan and this article. The procedure for approval of preliminary plats shall be as follows:

(1) An applicant shall file an application for approval of a preliminary plat showing proposed improvements and other supplementary material as required in subsection C2 of this section. All persons submitting applications for a preliminary plat shall be required to submit to the director an application upon the form(s) provided by the development services department and accompanied by an application fee as established in subsection 8-7A-2E of this title. No application shall be considered as accepted by the director, nor shall the time limits hereinafter set out for action commence to run, unless it is complete with all the required information.

(2) Twenty (20) copies of the preliminary plat application and all supplementary material shall be filed with the director. All materials shall be collated.

(A) Upon receipt of the required application materials, the director shall transmit a copy of the application to applicable agencies or jurisdictions for review and comments.

(i) Agencies to which the director shall transmit applications include:

Central district health department

Ada County engineer

Ada County highway district

Appropriate city, if within an area of city impact as set forth in title 9 of this code.

(ii) The director may refer such applications to agencies that have a jurisdictional interest. The director shall maintain a list of agencies for this purpose.

(B) Written recommendations and comments will be accepted up to the time of the public hearing from various departments or agencies.

(3) Within the time given below the commission shall act on the application:

(A) The commission shall schedule and conduct a public hearing within forty (40) days after acceptance of the preliminary plat application.

(B) The commission shall make a written recommendation to the board based upon findings of fact and conclusions of law.

(4) The action of the commission shall be noted on two (2) copies of the preliminary plat.

(5) Recommendation of approval of a preliminary plat shall not constitute approval of the final plat; rather, it shall be deemed an expression of approval of the layout and other information shown on the plat submitted.

b. Procedure For Preliminary Plat Approval By The Board: Following the recommendation of the preliminary plat by the commission, the preliminary plat shall be submitted to the board for approval. The applicant shall have the right to seek simultaneous approval of the preliminary and final plats. The provisions of subsection C1d of this section shall govern the procedure for this simultaneous approval. The applicant shall notify the director of the intent for simultaneous submittal and submit the preliminary and final plats to comply with the time frame set forth in subsection C1b(2) of this section. The procedure for approval by the board of the preliminary plat shall be as follows:

(1) The preliminary plat submitted to the board shall conform to the preliminary plat as recommended by the commission.

(2) Within the time given below the board shall act on the application:

(A) The board shall schedule and conduct a public hearing within thirty (30) days after receipt of the commission's recommendation on the preliminary plat application.

(B) The board shall state its approval or denial in writing, based on findings of fact and conclusions of law.

(3) The action of the board shall be noted on two (2) copies of the preliminary plat. One copy shall be returned to the applicant and one copy retained by the director.

(4) Approval of a preliminary plat shall not constitute approval of the final plat; rather, it shall be deemed an expression of approval of the layout and other information shown on the preliminary plat as a guide to the preparation of the final plat.

(5) The term of approval of the preliminary plat by the board shall not exceed twenty four (24) months. Failure to submit an acceptable final plat within the twenty four (24) month period will result in the approval of the preliminary plat becoming null and void. Provided, however, that the applicant may request, and the board may authorize, a time extension pursuant to the provisions of, and limitations set forth in, section 8-7-6 of this title.

c. Procedure For Final Plat Approval By The Board: Following the approval of the preliminary plat by the board, the final plat shall be submitted to the director for the board's approval and signature. The procedure for approval of the final plat shall be as follows:

(1) The final plat shall conform to the preliminary plat as approved, and if desired by the applicant, it may constitute the entire preliminary plat or any portion (phase) thereof; provided, however, that such portion (phase) conforms to all requirements of the approval.

(2) The final plat and other documents required for approval shall be prepared as specified herein. The final plat shall be submitted to the director within the time allowed in subsection C1b(5) of this section from the board's approval of the preliminary plat; otherwise, such approval shall expire. The board may authorize time extensions in accordance with section 8-7-6 of this title. Provided, however, that where developments are made in successive contiguous portions (phases) in any orderly and reasonable manner, without material changes or departures from the preliminary plat, such portions (phases), if submitted within successive two (2) year intervals, may be considered for final plat approval.

(3) The final plat, properly executed and approved as required by law shall be presented to the board by the director. The board shall review said plat and any recommendations made by the director. When approved by the board, said plat shall be signed by the chairman of the board and a notation made in the minutes of the meeting. Any exceptions or conditions relating to said approval shall be noted in the minutes.

(4) The board shall act on the application:

(A) Within thirty (30) days after receipt of an acceptable final plat.

(B) If approved, the board shall adopt findings of fact and conclusions of law, and shall state its approval and the conditions of approval, if any, or if disapproved, state its disapproval and the reasons therefor in writing based on findings of fact and conclusions of law.

(5) Final plat and covenants shall be filed with and recorded by the Ada County recorder within one year after written approval by the board. Provided, however, that the applicant may request, and the board may authorize, a time extension pursuant to the provisions of, and limitations set forth in, section 8-7-6 of this title. No plat or dedication, or any instrument passing title to any portion thereof, shall be offered for recording unless approved in accordance with this article.

d. Procedure For Simultaneous Approval Of The Preliminary Plat And Final Plat By The Board: Following the recommendation of the preliminary plat by the commission, the preliminary plat shall be submitted to the board for approval, and a final plat shall be submitted to the board for approval and signature. The procedure of simultaneous approval by the board of the preliminary plat and the final plat shall be as follows:

(1) The preliminary plat shall conform to the preliminary plat as recommended by the commission, and if desired by the applicant, it may constitute the entire preliminary plat or any portion (phase); provided, however, that such portion (phase) thereof conforms to all requirements of the approval.

(2) The final plat and other documents required for approval shall be prepared as specified herein. The final plat shall be submitted to the director.

(3) The preliminary plat and the final plat, properly executed as required by law, shall be presented to the board by the director. The board shall review said plats and any recommendations made by the director. The board shall act within thirty (30) days after review of the plats. When approved by the board, the final plat shall be signed by the chairman of the board and a notation made in the minutes of the meeting. Any exceptions or conditions relating to said approval shall be noted in the minutes. If approved, the board shall state its approval and the conditions of approval, if any, or if denied, state its denial and the reasons therefor in writing, based on findings of fact and conclusions of law.

2. Specifications For Preliminary And Final Plats:

a. Preliminary Plat Application: The application shall contain all the information specified in this section.

(1) The applicant shall submit evidence of proprietary interest in the land to be subdivided. Evidence acceptable to the director shall be a deed record, or, when the occasion demands, a land contract, or a current option to purchase, or written authority in recordable form authorizing the applicant to act as agent for the true owners of said property. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the director may require additional evidence of proprietary interest from the applicant or his agent.

(2) Information required on application forms as provided by the director.

(3) Such proposed restrictive covenants as are required to ensure continuing conformance with the standards set forth in this article, including, but not limited to, building setback lines, wildfire prevention requirements, and energy conservation standards, measures and suggestions.

b. Preliminary Plat Specifications:

(1) Drawing Specifications: All mapped information shall be prepared in a neat and legible manner and drawn to a scale of not less than one hundred feet (100') to the inch. A smaller scale or different size may be used for large developments with prior written approval from the director. Limits of the drawing shall include an area not less than one hundred feet (100') beyond boundaries of the proposed development. All maps shall show:

(A) The subdivision boundary which shall be based on an actual field survey. The stamp of the licensed professional land surveyor shall certify the boundary survey on the plan.

(B) The name of the owner, person and firm responsible for the drawing.

(C) The name of the proposed subdivision.

(D) The date, graphic scale, true north arrow, vicinity map and section, township and range.

(E) Ties to all controlling corners.

(F) The names of adjoining subdivisions.

(G) The proposed public street and private road names, street right of way lines, and street centerlines, and the location of proposed shared driveways.

(H) The lot layout with lot and block numbers and approximate dimensions of each lot.

(I) Areas of special use, i.e., parks, schools, open space, etc., and in residential plats all parcels intended for other than residential use shall be indicated by appropriate labeling.

(J) Location, width, direction of slope, and names of existing public streets and private roads.

(K) Important features, such as the following: outline of existing buildings, watercourses, power lines, telephone lines, railroad lines, any existing easement, municipal boundaries and section lines.

(L) The minimum setbacks from the front, the side and the rear lot lines.

(M) Contour lines based on USGS datum with intervals of not more than five feet (5') for parcels with a general slope of greater than five percent (5%) or intervals of not more than two feet (2') for parcels with a general slope of less than or equal to five percent (5%), which contour lines shall extend a minimum of one hundred feet (100') beyond the proposed development boundary, and if the proposed development is bordered by a drainage channel, extending the additional distance necessary to show the far side of the drainage facility.

(N) The proposed off site improvements pertaining to streets, water supply system, wastewater collection and treatment system, fire protection facilities and other essential public services.

(O) Location and identification of all potentially dangerous areas, including geologically hazardous areas, areas subject to inundations or flood hazard, and areas of high groundwater.

c. Preliminary Plat Supplemental Data:

(1) Percolation tests, approximate location of any areas of fill, and water table data as required by the county engineer. The elevations of all corner points on the boundaries of the proposed plat, subdivision or dedication. Contours when required by the county engineer with intervals of five feet (5') or less referenced to such datum acceptable to the county engineer.

(2) When drainage course and irrigation facilities are involved a topographical plan showing existing course, distance, dimensions, and proposed improvements including sewers, storm drains, catch basins, pumps, and seepage beds shall be provided. Documentary evidence of consent to reroutings by all interested landowners affected and having rights to and in such facilities shall also be provided.

(3) A reference table of lot numbers and lot types, as defined in subsection 8-21A-5A2 of this article must be provided.

(4) Any other supplementary data deemed necessary by the director based on the location; type of proposed development; or request or recommendation of another agency.

d. Final Plats: The final plat shall be prepared as provided by, and include the items required by, Idaho Code, title 50, chapter 13, related state law and the following additional requirements.

(1) The final plat, drawing page(s) and signature page shall be drawn on eighteen inch by twenty seven inch (18" x 27") sheets. No information, except for a borderline, shall be any closer to the edge of any sheet than three and one-half inches (31/2") at the left edge and a half inch (1/2") on all other edges. The letters, numbers, and notes shall be of such size and scale to clearly show on the microfilm copies, reproducible copies, and prints of the recorded documents.

(2) The drawings page(s) shall show exterior boundary and lot lines, right of way lines, streets, street islands, existing and new easements, all accurately dimensioned with bearings to the nearest one second and distances to the nearest one-hundredth (1/100) of a foot. The dimensions shall provide a minimum lot and boundary survey closure of one to ten thousand (1:10,000). The drawing page(s) and owner's certificate shall show or contain all related curve data including radius, length, central angle, long chord and long chord bearing.

(3) Permanent monuments, magnetically detectable, marked with the license number of the surveyor, shall be set for:

(A) All lot corners and the exterior boundary corners.

(B) Centerline angle points, point of curvatures (PCs), point of tangencies (PTs), intersecting street centerlines, and places where centerline changes directions.

(C) Street islands; radius points for cul-de-sacs; and property controlling corners that control the location of the boundary.

In places which are impossible or impractical to set the monument, a witness corner or reference monument shall be set and dimensioned accordingly. Such monument shall be of the same size and marking required for the monument it is replacing. A witness corner monument shall be set on the lot line or property line. A reference monument shall be set with a bearing and distance tie to the actual corner.

All monuments found, existing or accepted and used in the survey shall be marked with the license number of the survey.

(4) The plat shall show:

(A) Two (2) primary control points, approved by the county surveyor and "ties" to such control points. Primary control points must be public land survey corners or officially recognized corners with corner perpetuation and filing number shown.

(B) The approved street names. All street names shall be approved by the Ada County street name committee.

(C) Location, dimensions and purpose of any easements.

(D) Location, description and size of monuments that are set or found.

(E) Title, including subdivision name and general location description, and date.

(F) Owner's certificate shall contain a statement of dedication of easements and private roads. Private roads may be shown as a lot or an easement.

(G) The right of way width from centerline of each street or other right of way.

(H) Name and location of adjoining subdivisions. Other areas show as "unplatted".

(I) Building envelopes.

3. Required Improvements And Certificates Showing Compliance:

a. Monument And Plat Requirements: The requirements of the Idaho Code regarding plats and monuments shall be met and any work required to be performed on the property to meet such requirements shall be verified by the county surveyor prior to certification of the plat by him. The provisions of such sections as to monuments, stakes and other markings shall be considered minimum requirements, and the county surveyor may establish higher reasonable requirements for Hidden Springs planned community by filing a written specification under this section with the board; said written specifications shall become effective under this section only when approved by the board. Any such specifications shall be consistent with those applicable for plats in other portions of Ada County.

b. Streets And Other Improvements: Streets and other improvements, as hereinafter listed and as applicable, including, but not limited to, a domestic water supply system and wastewater collection and treatment system, public thoroughfare and easement signage and landscaping, trails, sidewalks, off street public and private parking areas and traffic control facilities shall be installed in each new development at the applicant's expense, unless a political subdivision is created or exists, in which case said improvements would be made and maintained by the political subdivision, all in accordance with the minimum standards set forth in this article, prior to the acceptance of any final plat for filing. In addition, prior to the acceptance of any final plat for filing, the applicant must prove adequate mechanisms exist for operations and maintenance of such public improvements. Public street improvements shall be in accordance with figures 8-21A-7C3b of this section, the specific plan and this article; provided that alternative public street improvements may be designed and constructed if approved by the Ada County highway district in accordance with its rules, regulations, policies and procedures. Private street and road improvements shall be considered, reviewed and approved in conjunction with the approval of plats pursuant to this article. Private street and road improvements shall comply with, and be approved pursuant to, the following criteria:

(1) Private streets are to be named in accordance with the provisions of the Ada County uniform street name ordinance.

(2) Private streets shall originate at a public right of way and terminate at a forty five foot (45') cul-de-sac or other approved turnaround area.

(3) Shared driveways shall originate at a public right of way or private road easement. The design and construction standards shall be approved by the engineer of record and the applicable fire district.

(4) Private street and shared driveway access shall be guaranteed by a recorded perpetual use easement to be noted on the final plat.

(5) Construction Standards:

  Private Streets   Shared Driveways  
1 to 4 lots   >4 lots  
Minimum right of way width   30'   30'   n/a  
Minimum improved width   20'   24'   20'  
6" of 3/4" crushed gravel, compacted   X   X   X  
2% slope from centerline   X   X   X  
Improved surface (minimum)   Pavement of asphalt or concrete. If concrete, pavement shall consist of a 4" slab on 4" of 3/4" gravel base course. If asphalt, pavement shall consist of a minimum of 2" machine laid asphalt with 6" of 3/4" gravel base course or 11/2" thick bituminous surface treatment on 6" of 3/4" gravel base course.   Pavement of asphalt or concrete. If concrete, pavement shall consist of a 4" slab on 4" of 3/4" gravel base course. If asphalt, pavement shall consist of a minimum of 21/2" machine laid asphalt with 6" of 3/4" gravel base course.   n/a  


FIGURE 8-21A-7C3B STREET IMPROVEMENTS

Road Type   ROW   Total Pavement Width   Travel Lanes   Shoulder
Width
(ea)  
Turn
Lane/
Median  
Parking (Left)   Sidewalk/
Bike Path  
Setback To Path
(1)  
Curb Type  
Rural collector - typical   60'   24'   2@12'   3'   None   None   10'   n/a   None  
Rural collector - with turn lane   60'   36'   2@12'   3'   12'   None   10'   n/a   None  
Rural collector - constrained   46'   24'   2@12'   3'   None   None   8'   n/a   None  
Dry Creek Bridge crossing   60'   26'   2@13'   0'   None   None   10'
 
n/a   6" vertical  
Rural residential - typical   50'   22'   2@11'   3'   None   None   8'   n/a   None  
Rural residential - constrained   40'   22'   2@11'   0'   None   None   8'   n/a   12" ribbon  
Village street - primary   72'   50'   2@12'   0'   10'   8'   5'   6'   6" vertical  
Village street - residential   56'   34'   2@10'   0'   None   7'   5'   6'   6" vertical  
Village alley   20'   16'   n/a   2'   None   None   None   n/a   None  

Note:
 (1) Distance measured from face of curb.


Notes:

(1) Pedestrian easement may or may not be contiguous. (Typical)

(2) The ROW shall be 80 feet for Cartwright Road southeast of its intersection with Dry Creek Road and for Dry Creek Road from its eastern terminus westward to and including the Dry Creek Bridge.

Rural Collector - Typical (Seaman's Gulch Road, Dry Creek Road, And Lower Cartwright Road):   Rural collectors serve to collect traffic from and distribute traffic to village streets and rural residential roadways throughout the project. They will also serve to accommodate through traffic - although through traffic will be discouraged to help maintain the rural character and minimize environmental impact to the Dry Creek Valley. The typical section includes a sixty foot (60') right of way with two (2) 12-foot travel lanes, two (2) 3-foot stabilized shoulders, and two (2) 8-foot maximum width grass swales. A single ten foot (10') pedestrian/bicycle path will meander in a pedestrian easement generally parallel to the right of way but not always contiguous to the right of way.  



Note:

(1) Pedestrian easement may or may not be contiguous. (Typical)

Rural Collector - With Turn Lane:   For rural collectors where turn lanes are needed, a twelve foot (12') center turn lane will be added as necessary to accommodate turning movement into project roadways. The section will also include travel lanes of twelve feet (12'). Otherwise the section will remain the same as the typical rural collector.  



Note:

(1) Pedestrian easement may or may not be contiguous. (Typical)

Rural Collector - Constrained (Upper Cartwright Road):   The rural collector constrained section mainly occurs in the upper portion of Cartwright Road. In order to maintain the visual character and minimize the site disturbance, this section has been narrowed. The typical section includes a forty six foot (46') right of way with two (2) 12-foot travel lanes, two (2) 3-foot stabilized shoulders, and two (2) 8-foot maximum width grass swales. A single eight foot (8') shared pedestrian/bicycle path will be approximately parallel to the right of way in a separate pedestrian easement.  



Note:

(1) Pedestrian easement may or may not be contiguous. (Typical)

Dry Creek Bridge Crossing:   The Dry Creek Bridge Crossing will provide enhanced capacity, safety and the addition of a separate bicycle/pedestrian facility across Dry Creek. The bridge can also serve as a primary visual identity element for the project, and may become a "covered bridge" with appropriate vertical clearance and architectural style. The bridge crossing will remain in its current location. Bridge width and associated grading should be kept to a minimum to prevent impact to the riparian corridor. The typical section includes a thirty two foot (32') wide bridge surface with two (2) 13-foot travel lanes. A single ten foot (10') pedestrian/bicycle path will be accommodated in a separate pedestrian/bicycle bridge crossing.  


Note:

(1) Pedestrian easement may or may not be contiguous. (Typical)

Rural Residential -
Typical:  
Rural residential streets include most of the roadways in Hidden Springs and will serve to carry local traffic to/from individual homesites. These roadways will be located and designed to discourage through traffic and maintain low vehicular speeds. The typical section includes a fifty foot (50') right of way with two (2) 11-foot travel lanes, two (2) 3-foot stabilized shoulders, and two (2) 8-foot maximum width grass swales. A single eight foot (8') shared pedestrian/bicycle path will meander beyond the ROW in a pedestrian easement as necessary.  



Note:

(1) Pedestrian easement may or may not be contiguous. (Typical)

Rural Residential -
Constrained:  
Constrained rural residential streets occur in steeply sloped areas that cannot handle the width required for the typical rural residential section. This section includes a forty foot (40') right of way with two (2) 11-foot travel lanes, no stabilized shoulders (but a 12 inch ribbon curb included in the 11 foot travel lane) and one grass swale on the uphill side of the street. An eight foot (8') pedestrian/bicycle path will be located on the downhill side of the street with a wood guardrail separating it from the street for safety purposes.  



Village Street - Primary (Seaman's Gulch Road, Dry Creek Road And McFarland Road Within The Village Center):   Primary village streets will serve as the "main streets" of the village center and will accommodate the potential for commercial uses, community center, school and village residential uses along their frontage. Village streets should establish a comfortable environment for pedestrians with slower vehicular speeds, frequent vehicular stops, on street parking and tree lined sidewalks. The typical section includes a seventy two foot (72') ROW with two (2) 12-foot travel lanes, one 10-foot turn lane (where necessary) or planted median, two (2) 8-foot parallel parking lanes, and five foot (5') sidewalks set back from the curb with a five foot six inch (5'6") tree lawn on both sides of the street and within the right of way.  



Village Residential (All Other Streets Within The Village Center):   Residential village streets should also establish a comfortable pedestrian environment with slow vehicular speeds, frequent vehicular stops, on street parking and tree lined sidewalks. Because turning volumes for these streets should be low enough to eliminate the need for turn lanes, the typical section includes a fifty six foot (56') right of way with two (2) 10-foot travel lanes, two (2) 7-foot parallel parking lanes and five foot (5') sidewalks set back from the curb with a five foot six inch (5'6") tree lawn.  




Village Alley:   Alleys will be created to eliminate driveways on village streets. Fewer driveways on village streets means more on street parking, more resident interaction, less utilitarian infrastructure and no unsightly garages lining residential streets. Alleys will also be used for utility easements, trash collection, and emergency vehicular access. The typical alley section includes a sixteen foot (16') paved lane with two foot (2') shoulders on each side.  

c. General Development Standards: The standards and specifications for each general type of use shall be as set forth in the Hidden Springs specific plan and this article.

d. Acceptance Of Improvements By County: Where an acceptable surety arrangement is deposited as provided in subsection C3e of this section and the work thereby guaranteed has been completed, notice in writing of such completion, together with sets of prints of the "as built" plans and specifications for all improvements, and requests for the return of the surety arrangement shall be given in duplicate to the director, who shall give one copy thereof to the county engineer for verification and certificate of completion of work. Upon the director receiving said certificate as provided in subsection C3g of this section, the director shall give notice to the county clerk to release the sureties heretofore deposited with said county clerk in the manner and to the extent as provided for in the surety agreement referred to in subsection C3e of this section and commensurate to the extent of the acceptance by the county engineer of the work, or other improvements called for in the surety agreement.

e. Deposit For Completion Of Required Improvements: An applicant or other interested party, in lieu of completion of the required minimum street and other improvements required by subsection C3b of this section, or any portion thereof, may deposit with the county clerk a surety bond or performance bond, or a certified check or a cashier's check drawn on a bank qualified to do business in the state, or a cash deposit, or an acceptable letter of credit, certificate of deposit, or assignment of funds on deposit in a bank or building and loan association, qualified to do business in the state, and the amount of such surety called for to be equal to not less than one hundred twenty percent (120%) of the cost of required improvements according to the estimate reviewed and approved by the Ada County engineer, and in all cases such surety shall be drawn in favor of, and payable to the order of the county of Ada, in accordance with the provisions contained in the surety agreement by and between the guarantor and the county of Ada. Such surety agreement shall contain suitable provisions requiring the applicant to construct all improvements.

f. Notice Of Installation: The applicant shall be required to give the county engineer two (2) days' advance notice of any and all construction of required improvements.

g. Certificates: Provisions requiring compliance by the applicant prior to recording of final plat shall be:

(1) A certificate by the county engineer certifying that the applicant has complied with one of the following alternatives:

(A) All improvements have been installed in accordance with the requirements of this article and with the action of the board giving conditional approval of the preliminary plat; or

(B) An acceptable surety arrangement has been posted, which is available to the county, and in sufficient amount to assure such completion of all required improvements.

(2) Such other certificates, affidavits, endorsements, or deductions as may be required by the commission in the enforcement of this article.

(3) Protective covenants in form for recording if required.

4. Dedication Of Streets: All public streets shall be done in accordance with the provisions of this article and the Ada County highway district's rules, regulations, policies and procedures.


D. Parcel Boundary Adjustment: The director may approve the adjustment of platted or unplatted parcel boundary lines. The approval process shall be as follows:

1. Application: All owners of parcels involved in parcel boundary adjustment shall submit a completed standard application to the director.

2. Tentative Approval: The director shall apply the following standards to determine whether or not approval of the proposed parcel boundary adjustment will be granted:

a. A parcel boundary adjustment shall not reduce the parcel site below the minimum dimensional standards prescribed by this article.

b. A parcel boundary adjustment shall not increase the original number of parcels.

c. A parcel boundary adjustment shall not change or move any public streets, private streets, easements, or publicly dedicated areas in any manner.

3. Final Approval: Upon tentative approval of the application by the director, the applicant shall:

a. Cause the property to be surveyed and a record of survey recorded;

b. Execute and record the necessary deeds to accomplish the parcel boundary adjustments as approved;

c. Obtain new tax parcel numbers from the Ada County assessor; and

d. Provide copies of the recorded record of survey, recorded deeds and the new tax parcel numbers to the director.

4. Certificate Of Approval Issuance: Upon determination by the director that the final parcel boundary adjustment is in conformance with this section, a certificate of approval shall be issued.

5. Required Fees: All required fees must be paid in accordance with chapter 7, article A of this title.


E. Administrative Permit Use Approval Process: Both the residential use and nonresidential use categories listed in subsections 8-21A-5B and C of this article, respectively, contain acceptable administrative permit uses. The development of any administrative permit use requires an administrative permit.

Administrative permit uses contained within subsections 8-21A-5B and C of this article are approved as follows:

1. Approval Required By The Director: In view of the potential impact upon adjacent property from an administrative permit use, the granting of such a permit shall be subject to review and approval by the director.

The applicant shall submit an application, as provided by the director, and pay a fee to the director in accordance with the provisions contained in this article. The fee schedule for administrative permits shall be proposed by the director and approved by the board.

2. Information Required On Application: The application for an administrative permit shall include the following information and materials:

a. A vicinity map at a scale of three hundred feet (300') per one inch (1").

b. A statement describing the project in narrative form.

c. A general description of how adjacent and neighboring properties will be protected from adverse effects, if any, prompted by the proposed development.

d. A statement setting forth the maximum overall gross floor area and, if applicable, the floor area ratio proposed, and the maximum gross floor area and floor area ratio proposed for each use in the proposed development.

e. A statement setting forth the number of parking spaces, and the general location and character, whether surface or structured, thereof, if applicable.

f. A statement of the improvements, public or private, on or off site, proposed for construction or dedication, and an estimate of the timing of providing such improvements.

g. A conceptual design plan, at an acceptable scale, showing, to the extent applicable, the location and arrangement of all proposed uses, the proposed traffic circulation plan including points of access, parking areas, major streets and major pedestrian, bike, or other recreational paths, all proposed major open space and landscaped areas, and the approximate location of all proposed community and public facilities.

h. Such additional information as the director may require, or the applicant may desire to submit, in order to facilitate review and consideration of the administrative permit use.

3. Notices And Meetings: The director shall mail notices to property owners within three hundred feet (300') of the external lot line of the property under consideration, and fifteen (15) days shall be allowed for response to said notice.

It shall be the sole duty of the applicant and not that of Ada County to provide notice and opportunity for a meeting at least fourteen (14) days prior to the administrative permit decision before the director to review the proposed project to all residents within three hundred feet (300') of the exterior boundary of the application parcel, and to all applicable community associations within the Hidden Springs planned community. Such meeting or opportunity for a meeting shall take place not more than six (6) months before submittal of the application. Verification of a meeting, or that an opportunity for a meeting was provided, shall be submitted in writing by the applicant to the director.

4. Approval/Findings: The director shall consider the following criteria in determining whether to approve, approve with conditions, or deny said administrative permit:

a. The proposed administrative permit use is designed to mitigate any substantial adverse impacts, hazard or nuisance, or other material detriment to surrounding lands;

b. The site is of sufficient size to accommodate the proposed use and all yards, open spaces, walls, fences, parking, loading areas, landscaping and design standards as are required by this article are met;

c. The proposed development is designed in accordance with public facilities, services, transportation systems and essential public services which are adequate for the development proposed, and which are available, or reasonably probable to be achieved, prior to use and occupancy of the development; and

d. The proposed use substantially complies with the Hidden Springs specific plan and this article.

5. Conditions: An application for an administrative permit shall be approved by the director contingent upon acceptance and observance of specified conditions including, but not limited to, the following:

a. Conformity to approved conceptual design plans;

b. Performance standards, related to the emission of noise, vibration, glare and other potentially adverse impacts;

c. Limits on time of day for the conduct of specified activities;

d. The period within which the permit shall be exercised or otherwise lapse;

e. Guarantees as to compliance with the terms of the approval;

f. A continuous obligation to maintain adequate housekeeping practices to prevent the creation of a nuisance;

g. Performance standards, which protect the public health, safety and welfare and mitigate adverse effects on surrounding property.

6. Application Time Frame: An application for an administrative permit shall be acted upon by the director within not more than sixty (60) days following acceptance of the application. Administrative permit uses may only be granted as allowed by this article.

7. Amendments: Once an administrative permit has been approved, the applicant may seek an amendment using the same procedures as an initial administrative permit use application.


F. Accessory Use Provisions: The director shall make the determination as to whether a building, structure or use is accessory to a principal permitted use or administrative permit use, and may issue zoning certificates if a use is determined to be accessory and would otherwise comply with this article.

The determination of whether a building, structure or use is accessory shall be based upon the relationship of the building, structure or use to the principal permitted use or administrative permit use. Specifically, it must be habitually or commonly established as reasonably incidental to the principal permitted use or administrative permit use and located and conducted on the same premises as the principal permitted use or administrative permit use. In determining whether it is accessory, the following factors shall be used:

1. The size of the lot in question;

2. The nature of the principal permitted or administrative permit use;

3. The zoning and land use on adjacent lots;

4. The actual incidence of similar accessory uses in the area; and

5. The potential for adverse impact on adjacent property.

The applicant shall submit an application on an approved form together with the established fee. The director, after reviewing said application, shall approve, approve with conditions, or deny said application within sixty (60) days of his acceptance of the application.


G. Employment Center Approval Process: The Hidden Springs zoning map and subsection 8-21A-5C6 of this article provide for "employment center" overlay districts. These employment center overlay districts and the permitted and accessory uses are consistent with the overall goals and policies and purposes and intent of the Hidden Springs specific plan and this article. The exact impacts of the employment center uses are difficult to determine until the specific use is identified and evaluated. As part of the application for an employment center use being considered in the Hidden Springs planned community, additional studies and analysis of the specific use as well as a public hearing before the commission are required.

1. Application Submittal: The applicant shall submit an application to the director in accordance with the provisions contained in this article. The fee schedule for employment center permits shall be proposed by the director and approved by the board. The director shall set the date for a public hearing and the notice of hearing shall be given in accordance with subsections G2 and G3 of this section.

2. Date Of Application: The date of application shall be the date that the director accepts a complete application including payment of the required fee and all of the information in the manner as required by this article. The date for the required public hearings shall be fixed by the director, within a reasonable time thereafter, and in no case later than sixty (60) days after receipt of the application in its due form. Hearing and notice procedures shall be governed by chapter 7, article A of this title, and Idaho Code section 67-6501 et seq., as shall be amended from time to time and by such rules and procedures as the commission and the board may adopt pursuant to this article and this title.

3. Hearings: At every public hearing before the commission, the commission shall hear all interested persons, or their representative. The commission shall receive, investigate, hear and take action upon every application received. In acting upon the applications involving property, the commission may require reasonable conditions of approval that it deems necessary to protect the public health, safety and welfare and prevent adverse impacts on surrounding parties. Action of the commission shall be documented.

4. Information Required On Application: The application for an employment center use permit shall include the information and materials required for an administrative permit application and such other information as the director shall identify in the preapplication conference as described in subsection B of this section.

5. Approval/Findings: An application for an employment center use permit may be approved only if the evidence at the hearings establishes that the proposed employment center use:

a. Utilizes site planning and general building massing and architecture themes that maintain or enhance the rural character of the Dry Creek Valley and surrounding areas;

b. Maintains or enhances the natural environmental qualities of the land and does not disrupt existing environmental systems;

c. Minimizes the visual impact of development by capitalizing on the site's existing landforms and supplemental grading and landscaping;

d. Connects to the projectwide network of roadways, paths and trails in an integrated manner;

e. Augments community water and sanitary wastewater collection and treatment systems sufficiently to support the proposed use without impacting the quality of service to residential and commercial uses within the community;

f. Is designed to mitigate any substantial adverse impacts, hazard or nuisance, or other material detriment to surrounding lands;

g. Is of sufficient size to accommodate the proposed use;

h. Is designed in accordance with public facilities, services, transportation systems and essential public services which are adequate for the development proposed, and which are available, or reasonably probable to be achieved prior to use and occupancy of the development; and

i. Is consistent with the general intent of the Hidden Springs specific plan.

6. Employment Center Use Permit Granted: The granting of an employment center use permit shall be subject to compliance with the Hidden Springs specific plan and this article. Employment center uses may only be granted as allowed by this article.

7. Employment Center Use Permit Approval: An application for an employment center use permit shall be approved by the commission contingent upon acceptance and observance of specified conditions including, but not limited to, the following:

a. Conformity to approved conceptual design plans;

b. Performance standards, related to the emission of noise, vibration, glare and other potentially adverse impacts;

c. Limits on time of day for the conduct of specified activities;

d. The period within which the permit shall be exercised or otherwise lapse;

e. Guarantees as to compliance with the terms of the approval;

f. A continuous obligation to maintain adequate operational practices to prevent the creation of a nuisance; and

g. Performance standards, which protect the public health, safety and welfare and mitigate adverse effects on surrounding property.

8. Amendments: Once an employment center use permit has been approved, an applicant may seek an amendment using the same procedures as an initial employment center application.


H. Building Permits: Building permits and grading permits shall be issued in accordance with the Ada County building code ordinance; provided, however, that no building or grading permit shall be issued to an applicant until such time as the applicant has provided to the county a certificate issued by the Hidden Springs design review committee approving the proposed building improvements and/or grading for which the building permit or grading permit is being sought.


I. Public Community Event Permit Approval Process: The holding of a public community event requires a public community event permit.

Public community event permits are approved as follows:

1. Approval Required By The Director: In view of the potential impact upon adjacent property from a public community event, the granting of such a permit shall be subject to review and approval by the director.

The applicant shall submit an application, as approved by the director, and pay a fee to the director in accordance with the provisions contained in this article.

2. Information Required On Application: The application for a public community event permit shall include the following information and materials:

a. Time, place, duration and location of event;

b. Nature of event;

c. Estimated attendance;

d. Prior to submittal of a public event permit application, the applicant shall submit written approval of the event plan from the following agencies to development services (the approval may be either on agency letterhead referring to the approved plan or may be written/stamped upon a copy of the approved plans):

(1) Central district health department,

(2) Ada County sheriff,

(3) North Ada County fire and rescue district;

e. Sanitary facilities to be provided, if any;

f. Traffic and parking management plans, if any;

g. Special security measures, if any;

h. Name, address and telephone number of event holder.

3. Approval/Findings: The director shall consider the following criteria in determining whether to approve, approve with conditions, or deny said permit:

a. The proposed site is of sufficient size to accommodate the event; and

b. The proposed sanitary facilities, traffic and parking plan, security measures, and fire protection and/or prevention measures are adequate for the proposed event.

4. Time Frame: An application for a public community event permit shall be submitted at least twenty five (25) days prior to the scheduled event. The director shall accept or reject the application for good cause shown, in writing, within five (5) days. Once the application has been formally accepted the director shall act upon the application within five (5) days.


J. Signs: Signs are allowed throughout Hidden Springs. Chapter 4, article I of this title shall not be applicable to signs within Hidden Springs. The design review committee shall have exclusive authority to approve all temporary signs within Hidden Springs. Temporary signs shall be those with a dimension of eighteen (18) square feet or less in sign fascia and shall be in existence for a period of one hundred eighty (180) days or less. The director shall review and approve or deny a sign in accordance with the design guidelines as set forth in section 8-21A-10 of this article.


K. Appeals: Actions taken by the director or commission to approve or deny any plat application, administrative permit use application, public community event permit application, sign application, or accessory use determination and including any condition of approval or denial thereof, may be appealed to the board by the applicant or any adversely affected, or aggrieved person.


L. Expenses For Processing Applications: All expenses necessary to provide the data required hereunder for processing and/or qualifying an application shall be paid by the applicant through the fee schedule process referenced herein.


M. Violations And Penalties: Each violation of this article set forth herein shall be a misdemeanor. Each violation for each day it shall continue shall constitute a separate offense, and each violation shall be punishable as provided in section 18-113, Idaho Code as it may from time to time be amended and/or retitled.

Whenever the director shall determine that a violation of these regulations has occurred, or is about to occur, he shall notify the board of such violation and recommend action that should be taken. Upon determination of a violation, whether or not a recommendation has been received from the director, the board may request the Ada County prosecuting attorney to commence action, criminal or civil, to correct the violation and to punish the same.

In the event any action is taken in violation of a provision hereof, the proper authorities of the county, in addition to other remedies, may institute any appropriate action or proceeding to prevent such unlawful development of land, to restrain, correct or abate such violation, or to prevent any illegal act, conduct, business or use in or about such premises. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 344, 9-10-1997; amd. Ord. 356, 5-13-1998; amd. Ord. 603, 1-30-2006; amd. Ord. 793, 12-7-2011)

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8-21A-8: AMENDMENTS:linklink

This article and/or the specific plan shall be amended in the same manner as provided in this title for amendments to the Ada County zoning ordinance. The specific plan shall be amended by resolution of the board. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
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8-21A-9: SPECIFIC PLAN:linklink
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8-21A-9-1: VISION STATEMENT:linklink

Vision:The primary vision of Hidden Springs is the creation of a rural community in the tradition of small towns spread throughout Idaho. In accomplishing this goal the traditional character of the Dry Creek area will be maintained, while allowing for low density residential development. In addition, development of the Hidden Springs community is intended to provide residents with a clear sense of place. The Hidden Springs plan includes a small Village Center; a general store; a school site; fire and sheriff facilities; playing fields; and recreation facilities.

Another principal element of the Hidden Springs vision is an emphasis on protecting and enhancing the natural environment. Plans for development are based on careful analysis of the physical and ecological characteristics of the land. Design standards and guidelines will ensure that only a very small fraction of the land is ever developed or disturbed and that homes will be compatible with the environmental systems of the area.

Perhaps most importantly, Hidden Springs has been conceived as an integrated rural planned community with requisite maintenance and operating entities and established development standards and design guidelines. When people make the choice to live in Hidden Springs it will be with a vision of what the community and its surroundings will be like both now and in the future.

Major Plan Elements:Traditional Village Center:
The Village Center is envisioned as a rural community center built around a general store, small scale shops and restaurants, a community center, recreation facilities and other appropriate commercial and community amenities. The Village Center will also include a fire station and sheriff's office.

Density And Community Diversity:
Hidden Springs specific plan assumes one thousand thirty five (1,035) units on one thousand seven hundred sixty five (1,765) acres, for an overall density of about one unit per one and seven-tenths (1.7) acres. A range of housing types and prices, from farm/ranch lots to townhomes will offer a diversity of living options from rural to traditional north end style housing. This concept promotes community diversity by offering a variety of housing opportunities for first time buyers through large families to empty nesters.

Traffic Reduction:
Hidden Springs is planned and designed to reduce reliance on the automobile and to minimize and contain vehicle trips, by:
* Providing a general store, schools, and on site recreation that will keep trips from going outside the project area.
* Directing traffic southwest to State Street via Gary Lane and westward to Highway 55 and Eagle Road.
* Providing a park and ride lot in the Village Center.
* Creating an extensive pedestrian and bicycle path system.
* Incorporating advanced technology to encourage and support telecommuting.

Trails And Greenbelt:
Hidden Springs will initiate and provide the foundation for major additions to the Boise foothills trail system, including:
* A publicly accessible greenbelt system for all of Dry Creek Valley, from Bogus Basin Road to Eagle, for both public recreation and wildlife habitat protection.
* Public access along Dry Creek, the western foothills and to trail systems beyond.
* In addition, Hidden Springs will feature a comprehensive internal pedestrian and bicycle path system to encourage nonmotorized transportation and on site recreation.

Wildlife:
The plans for Hidden Springs place strong emphasis on promoting wildlife, including:
* The conservation and enhancement of large upland and riparian areas as wildlife habitat or migration corridors.
* Attention to both game and nongame wildlife needs.
* A unique set of development standards and design guidelines prepared to minimize conflicts between wildlife and development through landscape design and domestic pet controls.
* Conservation and enhancement of the Dry Creek greenbelt corridor.

Design And Development Standards:
Plans and designs for Hidden Springs have been built from the ground up with sensitivity to the site's unique qualities and character. The built community will be based on standards including:
* Tucking new development into coves, and avoiding "ridge chopping" construction techniques.
* Locating roads to follow natural contours and approach development from draws and the rear to minimize visual impacts of road cuts.
* Designating building envelopes to ensure maintenance of the rural character and to minimize visual impacts of development.
* Designing landscape envelopes around homes to ensure the predominance of the indigenous vegetation and reduce water usage.

Water Conservation:
A water conservation program will be employed to reduce water requirements for homes built in Hidden Springs compared with conventional development with similar types of homes in the Boise area. The conservation program will include:
* A Xeriscape or low water consumption approach to new installed landscape.
* Limitation to areas to be landscaped.
* Use of advanced irrigation technology.
* Building design requirements for low flow or low water use fixtures.
* Educational materials provided to all homeowners. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999; amd. Ord. 697, 8-26-2008)
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8-21A-9-2: GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES:linklink

Community Goals, Objectives And Policies: The goals, objectives and policies for the community of Hidden Springs are as follows:

1. Create a rural community and a traditional village center.

2. Preserve and enhance the rural character of Hidden Springs in general and for the project site in particular.

3. Conserve and enhance wildlife habitat and migration corridors.

4. Maintain and enhance the natural environmental qualities of the land, and air and water quality.

5. Implement trip reduction strategies to reduce vehicular trip generation and minimize the number of vehicle trips outside the community.

6. Direct traffic to existing collector, state highways, and arterial streets to the south and west.

7. Provide for a mix of housing types and densities and commercial activities in order to provide for a strong and diverse community.

8. Minimize negative visual impacts of new development.

9. Provide a network of public and private paths for bicycles, pedestrians and, where appropriate, equestrians, to allow ease of movement around the community.

10. Provide for an irrigation delivery system for agricultural land and common areas.

11. Provide a publicly accessible greenbelt area and path along Dry Creek within the project site and on-site trails which link to the foothills regional trail system.

12. Ensure that the community has all essential public services and mechanisms in place to maintain and operate such systems.

13. Establish project, site and building design guidelines that will minimize the threat and assist in the control of wildfires.

14. Provide sites for schools, a fire station and law enforcement facilities.

15. Create parks, playing fields and recreational facilities.

16. Establish a community association with appropriate responsibilities for maintenance, management and governance of Hidden Springs. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

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8-21A-9-3: POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT TRENDS:linklink

The following table documents population estimates and projections for Ada County and planning areas within the County. These numbers have been adopted by the Ada Planning Association as the basis for planning activities in Ada County. Future population increases for Ada County have been forecast at an average annual rate of approximately three percent (3%). The rate of growth for 1990-1995 three and eight-tenths percent (3.8%), is considerably greater than the two percent (2%) average rate seen between 1980 and 1990.

Growth Patterns: The number of households continues to increase dramatically, surpassing population growth. This rapid growth pattern reflects a decrease in persons per household. Increase for the period 1990-1995 is estimated to be approximately 48,204 people for a 1995 estimated population of 253,954. Ada Planning Association (APA) data projects that between 1995 and 2000, 36,000 new residents can be expected for a total of 290,000.

Hidden Springs is located within the Ada Planning Association Area called Rural. More specifically it is located mostly within the Traffic Zone 211 which lies north of Hill Road and between Pierce Park and Seaman's Gulch Roads. The data for Traffic Zone 211 shows population doubling and households increasing by approximately one hundred percent (100%) from 1990 to 1995.

Alternative Plans: Ada County, the City of Boise and other local agencies have been moving forward in their evaluation of a land use plan for the foothills area, which covers the foothill area from Lucky Peak west to Highway 55 and includes the Dry Creek Valley and Hidden Springs. The Ada County Comprehensive Plan has been updated and adopted. The County anticipates consideration of the foothills plan in 1997.

Residential Development Patterns: Residential development in the Dry Creek Valley has historically been farm and ranch related. Since the mid-1980'showever, significant numbers of rural residential homes on sites ranging from one to twenty five (1_25) acres have been constructed. The pattern of rural residential construction along Dry Creek on the west side of Highway 55 is very extensive. Homes in that area are generally on lots from one-fourth (1/4) acre to five (5) acres. Demand for residential lots in Dry Creek to the east of Highway 55, which includes the Hidden Springs vicinity, is reported by property owners and realtors to be very high, although supply to this point has been limited to lot splits and small subdivisions.

Rapid growth in the Boise area is resulting in new development in a number of areas that have previously been predominantly rural. Hidden Springs, if built out completely in a fifteen (15) year period through 2010, would accommodate three percent (3%) of the population growth projected for Ada County.

Development Rationale And Justification: Hidden Springs is intended to accommodate and respond to the continued population growth Ada County is anticipated to experience. The Dry Creek Valley is identified in the current draft (and all previous drafts) of the city of Boise foothills plan as an area appropriate for development and urban densities. The physical and environmental characteristics of the Dry Creek Valley as well as the location of the valley in relation to existing and anticipated transportation networks make the area an appropriate place to accommodate planned community growth needs. Hidden Springs is also closer to the primary employment centers than much of the residential development occurring on prime farmland on the urban fringes.

Hidden Springs, at build-out, projects a total population of two thousand five hundred eighty eight (2,588), with school enrollment at five hundred eighteen (518). The project will provide a unique rural community and development alternative that is otherwise not available in Ada County. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999)

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8-21A-9-4: POPULATION PROJECTIONS:linklink


Ada County Population Projections By Planning Area  

Planning Area  
1990 US
Census  

1995  

2000  

2005  

2010  

2015  
Airport   749   814   821   786   734   662  
Central Bench   35,713   39,635   40,759   40,451   40,723   41,417  
Eagle   5,970   8,517   11,474   11,616   12,161   13,387  
Garden City   6,620   8,536   9,559   9,722   10,135   10,707  
Kuna   2,418   3,015   3,352   3,295   3,528   3,973  
Meridian   12,412   21,251   30,049   31,331   35,571   40,607  
North River              
  Downtown   3,022   3,025   3,403   3,873   4,031   4,059  
  East End   5,925   6,677   6,993   6,986   7,203   7,470  
  Foothills   7,679   8,910   9,949   10,547   11,335   12,172  
  North End   15,645   16,910   17,453   17,198   17,549   17,993  
  Northwest   9,886   13,958   14,690   16,379   16,691   17,163  
Southeast   21,742   29,892   34,536   36,891   40,910   46,014  
Southwest   20,090   21,255   24,570   28,089   29,745   32,749  
West Bench   44,304   55,571   62,593   65,995   69,961   74,344  
Rural County   13,575   15,988   19,754   24,682   32,564   41,123  
Total   205,750   253,954   289,955   307,841   332,841   363,840  


        1990    1995    2000



TAZ #211   Population   Households   Population   Households   Populati on   House holds  
 
  156   59   308   122   447   182  


Source: Ada Planning Association, 1995 Preliminary Projections

(Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
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8-21A-9-5: EXISTING CONDITIONS OVERVIEW:linklink

The predevelopment conditions section of this specific plan is a comprehensive overview of the existing conditions at Hidden Springs. This information has been compiled through the efforts of a team of planning and technical consultants that represent a wide range of expertise. Combining national experience with a strong local familiarity in their respective fields, these planners, landscape architects, engineers, archaeologists, geologists, economists, attorneys and natural resource specialists have all integrated their work to develop the background reports, maps and diagrams included herein. Each piece ofinformation was developed through extensive agency coordination, field review, public input and background research by the individual team members.

As part of this process, much of the critical existing natural, cultural and environmental components of Hidden Springs have been mapped and diagrammed through computer technology and a data base available in geographic information systems (GIS). This material was subsequently overlaid and composited into an analysis that identified the opportunities and limitations at Hidden Springs, providing the foundation for many of the critical land use strategies for the planning and development of Hidden Springs. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
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8-21A-9-6: VICINITY MAP:linklink

(see map on file in the county)

(Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
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8-21A-9-7: HISTORICAL OVERVIEW:linklink

A History Of Dry
Creek Valley, 1860s
To 1940s: The south fork of Dry Creek flows into a valley about a half (1/2) mile wide and two (2) miles long. Cottonwoods dot the creek bed and sage-covered sandstone hills surround the green valley floor. The Dry Creek area includes the region east from present day Highway 55, to Stewart Gulch and north from Hill Road to the Boise County line.

Boise Basin gold discoveries in 1863 brought hundreds of miners pouring into the region. Miners from played out Oregon and California gold camps came through Payette Valley, Horseshoe Bend, and by the new city of Boise, which was platted that year. It was situated next to the U.S. Army fort site selected by Major Pinckney Lugenbeel at the crossroads of the Oregon Trail and the road to the Boise Basin gold mines. Idaho Territory was established that year, with Boise named as its capital in 1864. Idaho first included what is now Montana and almost all of Wyoming. With the creation of Montana Territory in 1864 and Wyoming Territory in 1868, Idaho received its permanent boundaries. (1)

Boise became the major distribution site for Basin mining supplies and fresh produce. Many miners found it more profitable to make a living by raising livestock and some vegetables to sell to their counterparts and local soldiers, rather than mining the elusive gold. Small communities appeared throughout the Boise Basin as new settlers made their homes along creeks and rivers. There they could easily raise stock and crops and had ready access to local markets.

The Dry Creek Valley was one such community. It was centrally located near roads leading to the Boise Basin mines and the Boise Army barracks. An 1863 branch of the Oregon Trail passed nearby. Dry Creek's location, natural pastureland and rich soil made it a desirable setting. The creek and natural springs provided plentiful water for the stock and crops. For a short time in Dry Creek Valley, a stage station and stone hotel served travelers on their way to Boise Basin. (2)

Homestead records and deeds document eight land claims in Dry Creek Valley by 1864. One of the earliest settlers was P. L. Schick, who homesteaded what is now the Hidden Springs property in late 1864 with George Banker. They started out with five (5) horses, one wagon, one plow, and a harrow. Eventually Schick bought out Banker's interest in the property. Schick's assets, listed in the 1890 Ada County Assessor's records, show a man of substantial means:

money on deposit   $ 700.00  
2 vehicles   75.00  
harness   25.00  
55 stock horses   1,100.00  
3 cows   60.00  
7 cattle   84.00  
7 hogs   20.00 (3 )  


Schick and his family raised stock and farmed in the area until at least 1907.

Transportation networks in the region developedrapidly. In 1869 Alexander Rossi and A. H. Robie built a toll road from their Shafer Creek lumber mill, located near present-day Horseshoe Bend. The road ran to mining areas near Sinker Creek in Owyhee County. The road continued to make Dry Creek Valley a thoroughfare for many people. Rossi and Robie's mill supplied building materials for Boise, Silver City and other mining communities. The toll rates were two dollars fifty cents ($2.50) for one wagon and a span of horses or cattle and fifty cents ($0.50) for each additional span. (4)

Rossi and Robie ran the toll road until 1881, when Thomas Healy was granted a license to maintain the road "...from the crossing of Dry Creek to what is known as the Rossi Mill at Shafer Creek." (5) Healy typified many settlers of the Boise Valley. He first tried his hand at prospecting in Silver City and Atlanta. When that venture was not successful, he moved to Boise and formed a partnership with Frank Bailey to buy the Rossi sawmill. He maintained and ran the toll road until he sold it to Boise County in 1907. It was first called the Rossi Toll Road and eventually became known as Healy Toll Road. Toll rates dropped by 1884 to fifty cents ($0.50) for one wagon and a span of horses or cattle, with each additional stock or wagon an additional twenty five cents ($0.25). A single horse or vehicle cost twenty five cents ($0.25). Rates stayed at the same price until the toll road was sold. Thomas Healy remained in the Dry Creek Valley until his death in 1925. (6)

By 1873, the area residents were raising and marketing hay and oats for the local Boise market. One local farmer threshed ninety six (96) bushels of oats, grown on one acre of land. By the winter of 1873 hay was selling for thirty five dollars ($35.00) to forty dollars ($40.00) a ton, so it became more profitable for Dry Creek Valley farmers to raise hay than grain. (7) The newspapers also mentioned the potential of farming in Dry Creek Valley. They described the Hidden Springs property, which was now a farm under the ownership of A.J. Wyatt, in detail.

His farm comprises 160 acres, about 140 acres lying on the west side of the creek, all in one field, with the exception of five acres adjoining his house, fenced in for orchard and garden purposes. His house is on the sameside of the creek, with a running spring and milk house near by, and another small house where a tenant or hired men may occupy. The creek runs fifteen or twenty inches of water the driest time of the year, formed from springs at the source and along the banks, which increases it to two or three times the amount during the fore part of the season. (8)

From this land Mr. Wyatt was able to produce one hundred eighty (180) tons of hay planted on seventy five to eighty (75-80) acres. Local markets remained strong for hay and oat crops. Some farmers started planting fruit orchards, consisting mainly of peaches and apricots. (9)

By 1873, Dry Creek Valley had enough families with children to support a school. In 1878 the school housed twenty nine (29) children between the ages of five (5) and twenty one (21). The valley's early population supported a second school by 1918, the Stack Rock school. The Stack Rock community consisted of ten (10) families located north of Dry Creek Valley. At one time nineteen (19) students attended the Stack Rock School. (10) Both schools served as the cores of community social life. Unlike other small agricultural settlements, Dry Creek Valley did not support a store or a church. Social exchange occurred through shared farming tasks, visiting neighbors and school activities.

Dry Creek Valley agriculturists practiced dry farming supplemented by readily available water. Farmers used ditches from the creek to irrigate their crops. Other farmers took advantage of local artesian wells. Although the Dry Creek Valley residents did experience some drought years, they managed to make a basic living from dry farming. Large-scale irrigation never occurred in Dry Creek Valley. An 1889 newspaper account discusses the need for irrigation:

On Dry Creek, the difficulty is more serious, as there is really but little water flowing in the creek this season, and the greater portion of it is absorbed by the sand before it reaches the farms to be supplied. This state of things proves the necessity of some arrangement by which the waters of the streams could be held in reservoirs and distributed as needed. (11)

Dry Creek Valley continued to support stockmen and farmers through the turn of the century. Census records from 1870 to 1920 indicate that the majority of Dry Creek residents made a living by growing oats, barley and grain. They also raised horses, cattle, hogs and turkeys. Fruit production flourished until the 1930s. Peaches, prunes and cherries were successfully grown throughout the valley. The 1910 census indicated that farming remained the main occupation of almost all Dry Creek Valley family members. (12)

Basque Influence:A small knot of Basque families began to make Dry Creek Valley their home by 1910. Basques began immigrating to California in the 1860s from Spain. By the late 1870s many Basque men had worked their way north to Nevada, Oregon and Idaho working as herders for the expanding sheep industry. Some Basques eventually purchased their own farms and ranches. They offered jobs, homes and moral support to other Basques coming into the country. The Echeverria family exemplified this pattern. Pedro Echeverria arrived in the United States in 1900. In 1910 he owned property in Dry Creek Valley. Family members and other Basques worked as laborers on his farm. Yladio Echanove came to the U.S. in 1911 and was listed on the 1920 census as a boarder with the Echeverria family. Eventually the Echanove family bought the Echeverria property. Members of the Echanove family currently live in Dry Creek Valley. (13)

After 1900, local newspapers seldom mentioned the Dry Creek area beyond notices of births, deaths, and club meetings. Dry Creek Valley's heyday had ended. When the 1860s' mining boom ended, transportation routes changed and Dry Creek Valley was no longer centrally located. Only Boise City remained as the main market for local farmers. Dryland wheat production boomed in other southern Idaho communities from 1910 to 1923, but Dry Creek Valley farmers never participated in any large-scale crop production. The area also lay outside lands included in the federally funded Boise Irrigation Project, which promoted intensive cultivation of row crops. Dryland farmers had to compete with the increased production and higher quality of irrigated hay and grain. Aggressive promotion of irrigated lands and new communities caused settlement to shift to the river valley floor, rather than up in thedrier hills. There were still families who eked out a living in Dry Creek Valley, continuing to farm small acreages and raise horses and cattle. (14)

A long-term agricultural depression and the onset of the Great Depression made life difficult for most Dry Creek farmer stockmen. Several families moved away. Some older students dropped out of school and worked to help their parents and siblings. The number of Dry Creek Valley school students was cut in half during the 1930s, and its population never grew again. Natural disasters also threatened Dry Creek Valley during the 1930s, particularly range fires and insect invasions. The community pulled together to fend off these disasters. When the cheat grass-covered hills turned into flames, local farmers used their field plows to create fire breaks around everyone's property. The "Mormon Cricket" invasion of the late 1930s swept through the area, but Dry Creek Valley crops escaped relatively unscathed. Anastasio Ostolasa remembered farm families beating on pots and pans to scare away the ravenous crickets. (15)

"Gentleman Farmers":"Gentleman farmers" from Boise also bought some Dry Creek Valley farms for country living or for increased acreage. Fred Parsons, who bought the former Schick property and adjacent acreages in the 1930s, was a retired cashier from Pacific National Bank. His wife Anna Moore came from the well-known Christopher Moore family, president of Idaho First National Bank. Parsons dabbled in agriculture and livestock, and hired the Ostalosa family to oversee the operation of his Dry Creek Valley farm. Constantino Ostolasa had previously worked at the nearby Spring Valley Ranch. The Parsons lived on their Dry Creek Valley property and soon made improvements to it. A young Anastasio Ostolasa helped his father Constantino plant locust trees, which still shade the lane and dwellings. In the 1940s Parsons sold his Dry Creek Valley holdings to Jack Dechambeau of Eagle, who used it to supplement his rangeland and feed. Anastasio Ostolasa brought his war bride from Oregon to the farm and worked for the Dechambeaus. He continued to live on the property until his recent death in August 1996. His sisters and wife continue to live on the property. (16)

The Second World War and increased agriculturalmechanization took its toll on the Dry Creek Valley population. America's involvement in the war took many people out of rural communities to contribute to the war effort. The war had broadened the world for many farm boys and girls, and introduced them to other ways of life and people. With tractors and harvesters it took fewer family members and hired hands to operate a farm. Dry Creek Valley farmers' small acreages could barely compete with larger corporate operations. Both local schools were closed by the 1940s, and students rode the bus to Boise schools.

While many people left rural communities like Dry Creek Valley, still others returned to continue an agricultural lifestyle. Today there are still relatives of early Dry Creek Valley homesteaders who make a portion of their living from the land, despite continuing ups and downs in the agricultural business. More recent landowners moved there to simply enjoy the rural setting, within relatively easy access to the amenities of city life. The Dry Creek Valley remains a quiet oasis in Southwestern Idaho's sagebrush hills.

End Notes:(1) "The Idaho-Montana Boundary Legend," Idaho State Historical Society (hereafter ISHS) Reference Series, No. 156. Revised January 1966.

(2) "Local Brevities," Idaho Tri-Weekly Statesman, 20 September 1873, p. 3.

(3) Assessment Rolls, Ada County, Idaho, 1890, p. 239. On microfilm at the ISHS, Boise.

(4) Idaho Tri-Weekly Statesman, 23 October 1869, p. 3.

(5) Ada County Commission Records, 1881, Book A, p. 141-142. On microfilm at the ISHS, Boise.

(6) The Idaho Statesman, 1925. See also The Idaho World, February 1907, p. 6.

(7) See the Idaho Tri-Weekly Statesman, 9 September 1873, p. 3; see also 3 January 1874, p. 3.

(8) "A. J. Wyatt's Farm," Ibid., 20 September 1873.

(9) Ibid., p. 3.

(10) Ibid., 21 June 1878, p. 3. See also The Edith S. Hayes Collection, MS 492, ISHS Archives, Boise; Dorothy Stiff Wyman, Light Upon the Mountain (Bend, Oregon: Maverick Publications, 1989), p. 19; and field notes of conversation with Anastasio Ostolasa, 13 July 1994, in authors' personal files.

(11) See the following article in "Fifty Years in the Statesman," Idaho Daily Statesman, 3 September 1939, p. 8: "Water Supply cause of Row", (September 1889).

(12) U.S. Bureau of the Census, Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 Population, (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1913), p. 282.

(13) Information of Echeverria & Echanove in the "Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920 Population," on microfilm at the ISHS.

(14) See several issues of the Idaho Daily Statesman, 1910, for the changing emphasis to irrigated farming and the introduction of dryland wheat.

(15) For descriptions of the Depression, fires and crickets near Stack Rock, see Dorothy Stiff Wyman's Light Upon the Mountain, p. 76. For descriptions of the same in the Dry Creek Valley, see field notes of conversation with Anastasio Ostalosa.

(16) For information on Frank Parsons and his holdings on Dry Creek, see Metzker Map of Ada County, 1936, on file at the ISHS; James H. Hawley, History of Idaho, Vol. II (Chicago: Clarke Publishing Company, 1920), pp. 248-249; see also field notes of conversation with Anastasio Ostalosa.
(Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

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8-21A-9-8: SLOPES:linklink

The central portion of the Hidden Springs property is characterized by the relatively flat valley floor and shallow, even slopes that are found throughout the Dry Creek Valley as it runs west toward Highway 55. The creek and valley diagonally bisect the property into two(2) distinct northern and southern portions that are quite different in slope orientation and configuration.

On the southern side of the property, toward the west, the valley floor gradually transitions into moderate slopes as the foothills protrude in finger-like formations into the site. Between these finger ridges are long, narrow valleys and gulches with moderate to steep sides. Most of the ridges in this area have round, flat tops that gradually increase in slope as they move to the south and off the property.

On the northern portion of the property, a more abrupt transition occurs from the valley floor into steep slopes immediately north of Dry Creek Road. Above these wide south-facing slopes are pockets of relatively flat land with a distinct "bowl" formation that runs east to west, parallel to Currant Creek. North of Currant Creek, a broad, moderate south-facing slope continues again north of the power line to a major peak with long backslopes that drop into the McFarland Creek basin. The canyon that runs north and south along the eastern edge of the site, through which Cartwright Road runs, has steep sides that start to diminish and flatten toward the north end of the property.

Much of the slope area in Hidden Springs is less than twenty five percent (25%), which makes for favorable building sites. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
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8-21A-9-9: ASPECT/VIEWS/CLIMATE:linklink

Aspect:The Hidden Springs area is dominated by broad, south and west facing slopes with high solar exposure in the northern portion of the property, north of Dry Creek Road. The exceptions to this condition are pockets of north and east facing slopes within the Currant Creek basin and the north facing slopes that drop into the McFarland Creek basin. The Dry Creek Valley is generally flat and open with varying degrees of solar exposure, depending upon tree cover and proximity to the foothills at the southwest portion of the site. The ridges and narrow valleys of the foothills that run in a north to south direction in the southwest portion of the property create long side slopes witha solar orientation to the east and west. Various pockets of a northern aspect here are attributed to the ends of the ridgelines and certain areas within the narrow gulches, between the ridges.

Views:The views within the Hidden Springs property are generally open, up to the one hundred eighty degree (180°) range throughout the upper elevations of the site. Hidden Springs is generally not visible from the Boise area. Views from the ridgelines on the southern portion of the site extend into Dry Creek Valley and northward to Bogus Basin.

Climate:The climate and wind patterns of the Hidden Springs property are typical of the Boise region. The temperate climate and four seasons are influenced by storm fronts that originate in the Pacific Ocean. There are occasional winter temperature inversions with extended periods of fog and cold that cause air quality problems. There is an average 12 inches of precipitation. January precipitation averages 1.6 inches with 30 degree temperatures. The average July precipitation is 0.3 inches with temperatures in the range of 80 to 100 degrees. It is not uncommon to have 20 to 30 days of no precipitation in the months of July and August. Typically the area at this elevation receives a total of 1.5 to 2 feet of snow during the winter months with snow staying on the ground for an average of 5 to 7 days. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
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8-21A-9-10: GEOLOGIC CONDITIONS:linklink

Geologic Overview:Portions of the geology in the Dry Creek area have been mapped in the past by K.M. Hollenbaugh, 1972; Othberg and Burnham, 1990; Baker, 1991; and Burnham and Wood, 1992. The unconsolidated soil and rock that underlie the Hidden Springs property range in age from Pliocene to Holocene, which is relatively recent in geological time. The Dry Creek area occurs within a transition zone between fluvial (stream deposited) sediments and lacustrine (lake deposited) sediments. Certain geologic events that occurred prior to the emplacement of the known soil and rock in the area greatly influenced the types of deposition and geomorphology that is characteristic of the area today. These earlier events include a long period of granitic intrusions,regional uplift, and volcanism. In addition, evidence of large lake deposition and erosion are evident in the lower elevations along Dry Creek. Wave cut benches are characteristic of the lower foothill elevations along the south side of Dry Creek. Ancestral streams carrying sediments from the adjacent uplands were also deposited near the lake margins.

Coarse-grained sands were deposited along the stream channels and shores of the lake. Finer sands and silts were carried down the Dry Creek drainage system. The sediments that were deposited are collectively known as sediments of the Idaho Group. Because of the depositional complexity of the sediments in the Boise foothills (which includes the Dry Creek area), recent lithostratigraphic formation name changes within the Idaho Group have been reassigned the Terteling Springs Formation. The formation consists of four (4) distinct lithologic members of which portions are found in the study area.

Objective:The surficial geology shows the deposits within the study area and their general relationships. The geology of an area constitutes the framework which influences the development of other natural features. Soils developed from the weathering of the geologic units and both surface and subsurface water flow are largely controlled by the geologic framework. Successful planning and engineering development depends upon an understanding of the geology of the area, as well as an understanding of physical properties of the soil and rock. The geologic map presented in this report was compiled from known map sources and field reconnaissance and is a preliminary guide to geologic units and features for the Hidden Springs area.

Faulting And Seismicity:Foothills faulting generally occurs in NW/SE and/or east-west trending normal faults. Distinct separation of foothills and valley floor often make fault traces. The exception in the Dry Creek area is separation of lithologic units or nonconformable lateral extension of rock and soil formations. Splinter faults subparallel and often perpendicular to the primary faults have helped define the present geomorphology of the area. Faulting in the foothills is known to consist of single fault plains a few inches wide or fault zones, several feet to tens of feet wide that are composed of manyinterconnected fault plains. Field observation collected during preliminary site reconnaissances imply that Dry Creek may be structurally controlled. Observations include linear correlation of primary structures such as contorted bedding plains, hot springs, and unconformable bedding.

Woodward-Lundgren and Associates identified most foothill faults as inactive. According to Woodward-Lundgren, there has not been historical movement of the major faults in the area within the last five hundred thousand (500,000) years. The U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey in their Seismic Risk Map (1969) and the Uniform Building Code (1982) assign the area to Zone 2B, indicating moderate potential for earthquake damage. Zone 2 corresponds to a maximum earthquake intensity of VII on the modified Mercalli intensity scale. Damage in the study area would probably be caused by ground shaking due to fault displacement outside the study area. Miller and Jones (1988) performed a probabilistic estimation of earthquake intensities for Idaho based on the historic seismic record. They concluded that there is better than a ninety percent (90%) probability that the maximum earthquake intensity will be less than VI for the foothills area for a given fifty (50) year period.

Lithologic Map Units:The following lithologic descriptions are characteristic of the geologic units present in the study area.

Biotite Granite And Granodiorite
Areas along the northern and northeastern area of the Hidden Springs property is underlain by intrusive igneous rocks of the Idaho batholith. Biotite granite and granodiorite are the dominant rock types. The granites are typically light gray and medium to coarse-grained. The fracture spacing varies from a few inches to several feet. The granitics vary from slightly weathered to decomposed. Differential weathering of the batholithic rocks have exposed large rounded outcroppings east of Cartwright Road north of Dry Creek.

Terteling Springs Formation
The Terteling Springs Formation is a facies assemblage of sediments and sedimentary rock mostly of lacustrine or lakeshore depositional environment. The base of the formation is mappedwhere these sedimentary deposits rest upon a thick sequence of plagonite tuff and basalt, or upon rhyolite or the granitic rock. The formation is composed of tan to light gray silts, sands and clays. Induration is moderate, although very dense, silica-cemented sandstone is locally present. The silica cement was precipitated from hydrothermal ground water which moved through fault conduits. Fracturing is not evident in the sand layers. Fracture spacing is not evident in the sand layers. Fracture spacing in the sandstone ranges from six inches (6") to ten feet (10') or more. Some minor amounts of poorly to well-sorted, light gray to tan sand with minor gravel and claystone layer are locally present.

Undifferentiated Basalt
A volcanic assemblage of tuffs, basalts and ash occurs beneath and interbedded with the Terteling Springs Formation. The low shear strength of portions of this unit are often associated with unstable slopes in the Boise foothills. The unit often contains expansive clays. The volcanic assemblages are identified by dark brown soils with mud-cracked and fissured surfaces.

Intracanyon Terrace Gravel
Fluvial sand and sandy gravel with subangular cobbles and boulders are characteristic of this lithologic unit. These deposits form terraces along some of the gulches and also flat divides between canyon/gulch near the margins of the foothill-valley environment. Induration and stratification are relatively poor. These deposits represent stream and wave cut action of the Dry Creek drainage.

Quaternary Alluvial Fan Deposits
This unit is comprised of light gray to tan sand and gravel deposits. The sand and gravel is poorly indurated and poorly stratified. Fracturing is not evident. The deposits are usually located near the mouth of established drainages.

Landslide Deposits
This unit is comprised of unsorted, unstratified rock and soil masses which have been deposited by slumps, landslides and debris flows. The particle size may range from clay to large boulders. The ground surfaces are hummocky with flat lobate toes. This unit also includes the scar area from which the soil and rock mass originated and displaced rock units which are not related tofaulting. The color is dependent upon the source material. Fractures are not evident. Slope failure is evident in the study area, particularly north of Current Creek.

Recent Alluvium Deposits
This lithologic unit consists of unconsolidated silt, sand and gravel deposits of the Dry Creek drainage, Currant Creek and McFarland Creek. Fractures are not evident. This unit also includes recent flood plain deposits along Dry Creek. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
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8-21A-9-11: SOIL CONDITIONS:linklink

Soil Overview:The surficial soils of the Hidden Springs property are associated with two (2) Idaho soil geomorphic provinces: the Northern Rocky Mountain province and the Malheur-Boise Basin of the High Lava Plains subprovince of the Columbia Intermontane province. The diverse topography throughout the project area has contributed to a highly variable soil morphology. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service has identified twelve (12) soil classifications for the area.

Objective: The recognition and/or prediction of soil behavior with respect to soil morphology is paramount in selecting the correct avenue for land use planning. Recognition of the diverse soil behavior is useful in adjusting land use, including the urbanization, to the limitations and potentials of natural resources and the environment. Planners and others using the soil data can evaluate the impact of specific land uses on the overall productivity of the survey area or other broad planning areas and on land use patterns.

Soil Units: The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service (SCS) has identified twelve (12) soil units for the Hidden Springs property. These units are listed below.

    Brent-Ladd    Ladd-Searles
        Cashmere    Lankbush-Brent
        Drax Loam    Payette-Quincy
        Gem Rock    Quincy-Brent
        Goose Creek    Searles-Rock
        Haw-Lankbush    Vanderhoff

Engineering Soils Table And Map: Table 1 provides engineering information related to the use of each soil unit as it relates to building sites, sanitary facilities, construction material and water management. The engineering data is based on SCS test data using known relationships between soil properties and the behavior of soils in various engineering uses. The data presented in the table can be useful in choosing alternative practices or general designs that will overcome unfavorable soil properties and minimize soil-related failures. However, it is important to understand these data do not eliminate the need for site specific investigations, testing, and analysis.

The accompanying soils map provides a broad perspective of the soils and associated topography as well as the general diversification of the soil morphology for the Hidden Springs property.

This preliminary screening of soils properties provides a relatively normal (without unusual difficulty) geotechnical framework. Within the confines of regulatory oversight, good design practice and good construction technique there are no soils characteristics that would preclude development as planned.

1995 Field Observations and Soils Logs: Table 2: Soil logs provide a summary of the actual soils observations started in 1995, first as excavations for soils logs and also as observation wells for long-term observation of ground water level. Since the first series of observation wells, additional test pits and observation wells have been installed. Table 32: Ground water depth observation is a log of the depth to ground water at various observation wells and test pits. The soils map shows the approximate locations for the original observation wells and subsequent test pits and new observation wells.

Several important conclusions can be drawn from the soils information mentioned above.

* The soils in the valley floor up to the toe of slopes are suited to both individual and community subsurface treatment systems (subject to the normal design constraints).

* Soils classification for the purpose of subsurface treatment systems is C-2.

* The relatively fine-grained soils and substantial depth to ground water at the base of the slopes offer several good options for community subsurface treatment systems.

* The soils characteristics at the base of the slopes should provide for very high, equivalent to tertiary, treatment of domestic wastewater.

One Hundred Twenty Acre Annexation Area The U.S. department of agriculture natural resources conservation service has identified four (4) soil units for the one hundred twenty (120) acre annexation area, which has been reduced to ninety seven (97) acres due to the transfer to twenty three (23) acres to the Cartwright Ranch planned community in 2007. These units are listed below and are characterized in table 1A of this section:

Piercepark
Shadoval
Polecat
Quailridge


colored maps entitled "Soils-Annexation Area" and "Soils" are on file in the county

Fig. 2-F-a

Fig. 2-F-b

This chart is provided for informational purposes only. The formatting of this chart may vary from the offical hard copy. In the case of any discrepancy between this chart and the offical hard copy, the official hard copy will prevail.



TABLE 1
ENGINEERING SOILS TABLE




Soil Name  

USDA
Soil
Texture  
Unified
Soil
Classifi-cation  
Percent Passing
Sieve No. (Avg)  


Liquid
Limit  


Plasticity Index  


Perme-ability  

Soil
Reaction
pH  

Shrink
Swell
Potential  

Potential
Frost
Action  
4   10   40   200  
Brent-Ladd   Loam, Silt Loam, Sandy Clay Loam, Gravelly Clay Loam   CL-ML
CH-SM

GP-SM  
70-100   70-90   25-95   5   10-60   NP-25   .02-20   7.4-8.4   Low to Moderate   Low to Moderate  
Cashmere   Sandy Loam, Loamy Sand   SM   80-100   80-100   50-75   15-45   20-30   NP-5   2.0-20   6.1-7.8   Low   Moderate  
Drax Loam   Loam, Sandy Loam to Silty Clay Loam   CL-ML   100   90-100   85-100   55-90   20-30   5-10   0.2-2.0   6.6-9.0   Low   Moderate  
Gem Rock   Gravelly Clay Loam Clay, Clay Loam, Gravelly Silty Clay Loam, Loam, Gravelly Loam, Unweathered Bedrock   SM, CL, CH ML, GM-GC   65-100   55-100   40-100   35-95   20-65   NP-45   0.2-2.0   6.1-9.0   Low to High   Moderate  
Goose Creek   Loam, Sandy Loam to Clay   CL-ML, CL   100   100   85-100   55-85   20-40   5-20   0.2-20   6.6-8.4   Moderate   Moderate  

Haw-Lankbush  
Loam, Sandy Loam, Clay Loam, Sandy Clay Loam, Loamy Sand, Sand   ML, CL-ML, CL, SM-SC, SP-SM   85-100   85-100   45-100   5-90   20-30   NP-15   0.2-720   6.1-9.0   Low to Moderate   Moderate  
Ladd-Searles   Loam, Gravelly Loam, Clay Loam, Sandy Clay Loam, Sandy Loam, Gravelly Sandy Clayey Loam, Unweathered Bedrock   ML, CL-ML, CL, SM-SC, GM-GC, GP-GC   25-100   25-100   15-100   5-90   20-40   NP-15   0.2-20   6.1-7.3   Low to Moderate   Moderate  





Soil Name  


USDA Soil Texture  
Unified Soil Classifi-cation   Percent Passing
Sieve No. (Avg.)  


Liquid Limit  


Plasticity Index  


Perme-ability  

Soil Reaction
pH  

Shrink Swell Potential  

Potential Frost Action  
4   10   40   200  
Lankbush Brent   Sandy Loam, Sandy Clayey Loam, Clayey Loam, Loam Sand, Loamy Sand, Silt Gravelly Silt Loam, Gravelly Loam, Clay, Sandy Clay, Gravelly Clay Loam, Sand   CL-ML, CH, GM-GP, SM, SP-SM, SC   40-100   40-100   25-100   5-90   10-60   NP-40   <0.06-
20  
6.6-9.0   Low to High   Low to Moderate  
Payette-Quincy   Sandy Loam, Gravelly Sandy Loam, Coarse Sand, Loamy Sand, Gravelly Loamy Sand   SM, GM-GC, CL-ML, CL-ML, SP-SM   60-100   60-100   35-95   5-75   20-30   NP-10   6.0-720   6.1-8.4   Low   Low to Moderate  
Quincy-Brent   Gravelly Loamy Sand, Sandy Loam, Silt Loam, Sandy Clay, Clay Loam, Sand, Gravelly Sand, Gravelly Clay Loam, Gravelly Silt Loam, Gravelly Loam   SM, CL-ML, CH, GP-GM, SP-SM   40-100   40-100   25-100   5-90   10-60   NP-40   <0.06-
20  
6.1-8.4   Low to High   Low  
Searles-Rock   Stony Loam, Gravelly Clay Loam, Cobbly Loam, Unweathered Bedrock   ML, CL-ML, SM-SC   30-80   20-75   20-70   15-55   30-40   NP-15   0.2-2.0   6.6-7.3   Low to Moderate   Moderate  
Vanderhoff   Stony Loam, Gravelly Loam, Silt Loam, Sandy Loam, Weathered Bedrock   ML, CL-ML, SM-SC   80-100   60-100   40-100   25-80   20-30   NP-10   0.6-2.0   7.4-9.0   Low   Low  


TABLE 1A
ENGINEERING SOILS TABLE

Soil Name   USDA
Soil
Texture  
Unified
Soil
AASHTO  
Percent Passing
Sieve No. (Avg)  
Liquid
Limit  
Plasticity Index   Perme-ability Inch/Hour   Soil
Reaction
pH  
Shrink
Swell
Potential  
Potential
Frost
Action  
4   10   40   200  
Pierce Park (244)   Course
Sandy
Loam

Sandy
Loam

Sandy
Clay
Loam

Gravelly
Sandy
Loam  
SC


SM

SC-SM


A1, A2  
100   75_100   50_60   40_50   25_30   5_10   2.0_6.0   6.6_7.8   Low to moderate   Low to moderate  
Shadoval (315)   Silt loam

Silty clay
Loam

Clay
Loam  
CL

CH


CL-ML
A4, A6, A7  
100   95_100   85_90   75_85   25_60   5_40   0.6_2.0   6.6_8.4   Low to high   Moderate  
Polecat (316)   Silt loam

Silty clay loam

Clay
Loam  
CL

CL-ML

A4, A6, A7  
100   95_100   90_95   85_90   25_45   5_20   0.6_2.0   6.6_8.4   Low to moderate   Moderate  
Quailridge (358)   Coarse
Sandy
Loam

Sandy
Clay
Loam

Gravelly
Sandy
Clay
Loam  
SC


SC-SM




A2, A6  
0_10   75_100   60_90   50_75   25_50   25_40   2.0_20.0   6.6_7.8   Low to moderate   Moderate  



Table 2
Soils Logs - 1995

Estimated
5% Slope  

Pit #OW1  
Estimated
3% Slope  

Pit # OW2  
Estimated
8% Slope  

Pit #OW3  
0-28"






28-54"




66-92"




92-127"



127-168"




 
Clay loam (30% clay), 10YR 3/2, many fine and few medium roots, C-2 Design Soil Subgroup

Clay loam (35% clay), 10YR 3/2, many fine roots C-2

Silty clay (45% clay), 10YR 3/4, few fine roots, unsuitable

Sandy clay loam, (30% clay), 10YR 4/6, no roots, C-1

Silt loam (15% clay), compacted, 2.5Y 5/4 matrix, 7.5YR 5/6 mottles, no roots, B-2

-no free water (water table) to a 168" depth
 
0-36"





36-56"









 
Clay loam (28% clay), 10YR 2/2, common fine roots, few medium and course roots, C-1

Clay loam (30%+ clay), 10YR 3/2, common fine and few medium roots, C-2

-soil is saturated below 150", but no free water (water table) to 174"
 
0-14"




14-168"














 
Silty clay loam (30% clay), 10YR 3/2, many fine roots, C-2

Very dense silty lake sediments, very slowly permeable to impermeable, gleyed and mottled (mottled are thought to be "relic" and not indicative of present drainage)

-no free water (water table) to a 168" depth  



Table 2 (cont.)
Soils Logs - 1995

Estimated
2-3%
Slope  


Pit #OW7  

Estimated
4% Slope  


Pit #OW8a  

Estimated
4% Slope  


Pit #OW8  
0-16"




16-34"




34-58"



58-82"



82-168"






 
Sandy loam (18% clay), 10YR 3/3, many fine and few medium roots, B-1

Loamy coarse sand (5% clay), 10YR 3/3, few fine roots, A-2b

Clay loam (30% clay), 10YR 3/4, few fine roots, C-2

Sandy clay loam (22% clay), 10YR 4/4, no roots, C-1

Silt loam, (20% clay), 10YR 5/4, no roots, B-2

-no mottles or free water (water table to 168"
 
0-17"





17-28"




28-94+"


















 
Silty clay loam (30% clay), 10YR 3/2, many fine and few medium roots, C-2

Silty clay loam (35% clay), 2.5YR 4/2, few fine and medium roots, C-2

Silty loam (15% clay), very compacted lake sediments, 5Y 5/4 matrix, 7.5YR 5/6 mottles appear to be "relic", unsuitable

-no free water (water table) to 94"

-this pit was at the toe of an old land form and is underlain by thick, dense lake sediments

*no monitoring pipe was installed in this pit.
 
0-18"




18-36"




36-55"




55-168"











 
Silt loam (20% clay), 10YR 3/3, many fine roots, B-2

Silt loam (22% clay), 10YR 3/2, common fine roots, B-2

Silt loam (25% clay), 10YR 3/3, common fine roots, B-2

Silt loam (20% clay), 10YR 5/4, common fine roots, B-2

-no free water (water table) to 168"
 



Table 2 (cont.)
Soils Logs - 1995

Estimated
3% Slope  

Pit #OW4  
Estimated
7% Slope  

Pit #OW5  
Estimated
3% Slope  

Pit #OW6  
0-16"




16-34"




34-51"






51-168"






 
Silty clay loam (35% clay), 10YR 3/4, many fine roots, C-2

Silty clay loam (30% clay), 2.5Y 4/4, few fine roots C-2

Dense, silty lake sediments with 5-10% silty clay loam in fractures, few fine roots, C-2 to unsuitable

Very dense lake sediments, impermeable layer, unsuitable

-no free water to a 168" depth
 
0-22"




22-41"




41-65"





65-72"




72-90"






90-110"




110-168"




 
Silt loam (25% clay), 10YR 3/3, many fine and few medium roots, B-2

Silty clay loam (35% clay), 10YR 3/4, common fine roots, C-2

Silty clay loam (35%+ clay), 10YR 5/4, common fine roots, C-2

Loamy coarse sand (<5% clay), variegated color, no roots, A-2b

Very fine sandy loam (15% clay), 2.5Y 4/4 matrix, 7.5YR 5/4 mottles, no roots, compacted, B-2

Loamy coarse sand (<5% clay), variegated color, no roots, A-2b

Coarse sandy loam (10% clay), 2.5Y 5/4 matrix, 5YR 4/4 mottles, no roots, B-1

-no free water, but mottled below 72" (possibly "relic" mottles)
 
0-11"




11-20"




20-35"




35-52"




52-55"




55-120"





120-180"









 
Silt loam (22% clay), 10YR 3/4, many fine roots, B-2

Silty clay loam (35% clay), 10 YR 5/6, common fine roots, C-2

Sandy clay loam (30% clay), 10YR 5/4, few fine roots, C-1

Loamy coarse sand (<5% clay), variegated color, no roots, A-2b

Thin, weakly cemented hardpan, no roots, unsuitable

Silt loam (15% clay), 2.5Y 5/4 matrix, 7.5YR 5/4 mottles, no roots, B-2

Silt loam (10% clay), compacted lake sediments, 2.5Y 5/4, no mottles, no roots, C-2

-no free water (water table) to 180"

-mottles below 55" appear to be "relic"
 



Table 2 (cont.)
Soils Logs - 1995


Estimated
5% Slope  


Pit #OW9  
Estimated
2-3%
Slope  


Pit #OW10  

Estimated
4% Slope  


Pit #OW11  
0-8"




8-24"




24-36"




36-75"






75-168"




 
Clay loam (30% clay), 10YR 3/3 many fine and few medium roots, C-1

Clay loam (35% clay), 10YR 4/6 many fine roots, C-2

Sandy loam (15% clay), 10YR 5/4, common fine roots, B-1

Loamy coarse sand (<5% clay), variegated color, no roots, lens of silt loam about 4" thick, A-2b

Silt loam (20% clay), 2.5Y 7/4, no roots, slightly compacted, B-2  
0-28"





28-59"



59-108"




108-115"





115-150"





150-168"  
Loam (25% clay), 10YR 3/3, common fine and few medium roots, B-2

Clay loam (30% clay), 10YR 3/4, few fine roots, C-1

Loam (25% clay), 10YR 5/4, no roots, B-2


Silt loam (25% clay), 2.5Y 4/4 matrix, 10YR 5/6 mottles, no roots, B-2

Silty clay loam (35% clay), 2.5Y 4/4 matrix, 10YR 5/6 mottles, no roots, C-2

Silty clay (40% clay), 2.5Y 5/4, no mottles, unsuitable

-free water (water table) at 120" depth
 
0-28"






28-70"






70-155"




155-174"






 
Sandy loam (18% clay), 10YR 4/4, common fine and few medium roots, B-1

Sandy clay loam (25% clay), 10YR 4/6, common fine and few medium roots, C-1

Sandy loam (10% clay), 10YR 5/4, no roots, B-1

Silty clay loam (30% clay), 2.5Y 4/4 matrix, 7.5YR 5/6 mottles, no roots, C-1

-no free water (water table) to 174" depth  

(Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999; amd. Ord. 697, 8-26-2008)
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8-21A-9-12: SURFACE WATER HYDROLOGY:linklink

Hydrology Overview:The Dry Creek surface water hydrology system is derived from both artificial and natural sources. The artificial sources are derived through unused irrigation waters and excess water pumped to facilitate the needs of local livestock. The natural recharge sources include seasonal precipitation (average is 0.24 acre-feet per acre during growing season), and discharge of springs and seeps along Dry Creek and its tributaries.

Source fluctuations, especially seasonally, have had an effect on the spatial variation in local hydraulic conditions along the major drainage and have an important role in determining the controlling processes involved with local flood processes, resulting flood features, and subsequent erosional attributes. In addition, ancestral hydraulic processes have contributed to a diverse depositional morphology, especially along Dry Creek.

The principal hydrologic feature in the study area is the Dry Creek drainage basin. The basin drains approximately sixty (60) square miles of intermountain uplands. Gauging station records from 1953 through 1968 show peak discharges range from three thousand five hundred (3,500) to four thousand seven hundred (4,700) acre-feet of water for the basin that includes the Hidden Springs project area. The peak flows appear to be concentrated from February through April. The exception is occasionally January shows moderately high flows.

Floodways:Encroachment on the established floodplain, such as structures and fills, increases the concern of the effects from localized flooding. One aspect of floodplain management involves balancing the economic gain from floodplain development against the resulting increase of flood constraints. Floodway identification is a useful tool to assist local community development in proper floodway management as it relates to land use planning. The floodway delineated in this study was computed from Currant Creek east along Dry Creek using Federal Emergency Management Agency/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, hydrologic engineering analyst protocol. Peak flood discharges were determined for the 10, 50, and 100-year events for the Dry Creek drainage. Discharge rates and flow frequency information was obtained from gauging stations located approximately two (2.0) miles west of the study area. The results of the review show the 10, and 50-year flood events will probably be contained in the present Dry Creek channel. The 100-year event will probably overtop the present creek channel up to an average of approximately three hundred feet (300') lateral distance from the creek centroid. The accompanying map shows the flood plain boundary for the 10, 50, and 100-year flood events. The boundary locations are an integral part of effective long-term land use planning.

Natural Springs:The diverse depositional environment associated with Dry Creek has contributed to unique conditions that promote artesian flow at a number of locations along Dry Creek within the Hidden Springs property boundary. Approximately nine (9) natural springs are clustered near the southeast corner of section 31, the northwest corner of section 5 and the southwest corner of section 32, Township 5 North, Range 2 East.

Some diversion of spring flow has been attempted during the past for agricultural purposes, however, for the most part the springs have remained undeveloped. Flow of the springs is often intermittent, and depends largely on seasonal precipitation and local water recharge. The most likely explanation for the springs and their historic characteristic is that they are fed by recharge from precipitation, upstream irrigation and snowmelt from mountainous runoff generally from slopes to the north. Ancient streambeds (visible on current aerial photographs) probably transport the water from upstream surface and subsurface sources. The identification of shallow ground water areas is paramount in effective land use planning, especially during foundation engineering for residential development. The areas that have natural springs present are identified on the accompanying map. Some portions of thesesprings and the Dry Creek riparian area are wetlands areas.

Surface Water Recharge:Every year some sections of Dry Creek do in fact dry up. Various upstream reaches dry up while other reaches (benefiting from upstream recharge through shallow ground water) continue to flow. These historic characteristics provide a glimpse of the relative complexity and interrelationship between surface water and ground water. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
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8-21A-9-13: GROUND WATER:linklink

Ground water in the Hidden Springs area is found in permeable sedimentary aquifers and in fractured rock aquifers. The fractured rock aquifers appear to be limited to the slopes on the north side of Dry Creek. Depth to ground water varies, and ranges from a few feet below ground surface along Dry Creek, to more than one hundred feet (100') below ground surface in upland locations. Tables 2 and 3 provide actual soils logs and ground water depth data for a portion of the valley floor in Hidden Springs.

Hydrogeology:The Hidden Springs area geology is described in detail in a previous report as part of this Section. Ground water characteristics of the local hydrogeologic units are discussed below.

* Alluvium. Recent alluvium in the Dry Creek valley consists of unconsolidated sand, gravel, and silt that has been eroded from nearby uplands and deposited by Dry Creek and tributary streams. Thickness of the alluvium is generally less than fifty feet (50'). Ground water from the alluvium has been tapped by shallow wells for irrigation and domestic use.

* Terteling Springs Formation. The Terteling Springs formation is composed of a layered sequence of lake bed sediments - primarily sand, sandstone, silt, clay, and mudstone. Saturated sand and sandstone layers within the Terteling Springs formation act as productive aquifers. Domestic and irrigation wells within the project area vicinity tap aquifers within the Terteling Springs formation. Clay, silt, and mudstone layers act as aquitards, restricting the movement of ground water. Clay, silt, and mudstone sedimentsare believed to be the predominant saturated sediments south of Dry Creek.

* Volcanic Rocks. Volcanic rocks within the project area consist primarily of basalt flows. Most of these volcanics have relatively low permeability and are not considered to be significant aquifers, although some ground water production has been reported from basalt aquifers in areas of the foothills.

* Granite. Cretaceous-age granitic rocks of the Idaho Batholith are exposed within the Currant Creek drainage, east of Cartwright Road. These rocks generally have very low porosity and permeability and do not serve as productive aquifers.

Geothermal:Low temperature geothermal wells (85-110°F) have been drilled in the Dry Creek area, both east and west of the Hidden Springs project area. These wells tap aquifers found at depths of less than one thousand feet (1,000'). Warm ground water (>85°F) is likely to be found below about five hundred feet (500') beneath the Dry Creek Valley.

Ground waters with temperatures in excess of eighty five degrees Fahrenheit (85°F) (i.e., low-temperature geothermal waters) are generally restricted from development for municipal and irrigation uses by the 1982 Idaho Geothermal Resources Act. In addition, water temperatures in excess of eighty five degrees Fahrenheit (85°F) are not desirable for domestic use due to aesthetics, chemical composition and increased potential for bacterial contamination. As a result, warm ground waters are probably not available nor desirable for Hidden Springs water supply development.

Ground Water Flow: Within the project area, shallow ground water flow likely follows topography, with Dry Creek acting as the drain for ground water from upland areas. The depth to ground water data and soils logs presented in Tables 2 and 3 confirm the notion that Dry Creek acts as a drain for upstream events. Clearly the shallow ground water flow direction has component vectors both down the valley parallel to Dry Creek and perpendicular toward Dry Creek. It is not clear if deep ground water flow is parallel to Dry Creek, or south toward the Boise River. Local ground water flow in theHidden Springs area is probably influenced by geologic units and structure, with preferential movement through higher permeability materials in old streambeds and along fault-related fracture paths.

Groundwater Recharge And Discharge: Recharge of the local ground water system is derived primarily from leakage of Dry Creek and its tributary streams and from direct infiltration of precipitation. Additional recharge is derived from infiltration of flood irrigation water diverted from Dry Creek. Total annual ground water recharge has not been determined for the project area, but may be substantial during those months when Dry Creek is carrying snowmelt.

Ground water discharge currently occurs at domestic and irrigation wells, at springs, and through streambeds within the gaining reaches of Dry Creek and Currant Creek.

Surface water and ground water are generally in direct hydraulic connection in the vicinity of springs and in the gaining reaches of Dry Creek and tributary streams. During periods without direct runoff of precipitation or snowmelt, the flowing reaches of Dry Creek are probably a reflection of the local water table. Many of these reaches dry up during the summertime, suggesting a seasonal lowering of the local water table at that time.

Aquifer Hydraulics: Deep aquifer hydraulics within the study area are not known, and will need to be determined as part of a future test well program. Aquifer hydraulics in the lower Dry Creek area, west of the Hidden Springs project, were calculated following a 30-day pumping test of a well located approximately two (2) miles southwest of the junction of Highway 55 and Dry Creek Road (Feast, 1991 and Baker, 1991). This well was pumped at an average rate of 743 gallons per minute. Draw down in the pumping well was 81 feet after 30 days of pumping. Draw down in observation wells ranged from 3.8 feet at a well 800 feet from the pumping well to 1.0 feet at wells 2,300 and 3,600 feet from the pumping well. Based upon the response of the observation wells, aquifer transmissivities in the range of 33,000 to 92,000 ft2/day were calculated. The calculated storage coefficient ranged from 0.0006 to 0.08, indicating semi-confined conditions. Given the distance and changes in geologic conditions, the aquifer hydrauliccharacteristics in the Hidden Springs project area cannot be directly inferred from the characteristics in the Lower Dry Creek area.

Ground Water Quality: Analyses of water samples from wells in the vicinity of the project area are reported by Parliman (1983) and Baker (1991). These analyses include data for both warm water and cold water aquifers in the Dry Creek Valley. Based on these data, ground water from deep cold water aquifers in the Hidden Springs project area is anticipated to be good quality for domestic use, with moderate levels of hardness and no water quality parameters in excess of EPA maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Geothermal aquifers are also anticipated to be of good quality, with the exception of fluoride concentrations which may exceed EPA MCLs.

The shallow alluvial aquifer is often in direct hydraulic connection with the surface water flow of Dry Creek and as a result is not sufficiently protected from surface contaminants for domestic consumption. For that reason, the shallow alluvial aquifer is not as desirable for domestic use as deeper, more protected aquifers of the Terteling Springs Formation. Well logs suggest that clay layers should provide protection from surface and surficial activity for wells tapping aquifers below one hundred feet (100').

Existing Ground Water Development: Existing wells within the project area produce ground water primarily for domestic and stock water uses, with some minor irrigation uses. Wells outside of the project area produce water for agricultural irrigation and space heating, in addition to domestic and stock water.

Reported well yields in the Dry Creek Valley range from over two thousand (2,000) gallons per minute (gpm) to less than five (5) gpm. In general, the higher yield wells are located in the valley floor, west of the project site. The higher yield wells tap sand aquifers within the Terteling Springs Formation and the lower part of the recent alluvium. The low yield wells are typically located in either the granite foothills north and northeast of the site or in the thick blue clay sediments south of the site.

Documented Water Level Declines: There are no long-term ground water hydrographs for wells within the project area. The closest long-term hydrograph is for well 05N-01E-34DBB1, located in the Dry Creek Valley approximately three (3) miles west of the project. This hydrograph has a period of record of nearly thirty (30) years. Baker (1991) evaluated the hydrograph of this well and found no significant decline in recent years.

Table 3
Groundwater Depth Observations

Observation
Well Or Test Pit  
5-12-95   5-28-95   7-2-95   8-17-95   9-23-95   11-26-95   1-22-96   3-9-96   3-15-96   4-7-96   6-21-96   6-23-96   7-16-96   9-4-96  
OW1-168   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry (167")  
OW2-174   Damp   Damp   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Damp   _   Damp   _   Damp   _   Dry (172")  
OW3-168   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry (170")  
OW4-168   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry (162")  
OW5-168   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry (153")  
OW6-180   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry (178")  
OW7-168   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry (166")  
OW8a-94   Dry   No Pipe  
OW8-169   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry (172")  
OW9-168   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry   _   Dry (150")  
OW10-168   120   146   141   Damp   Damp   Damp   Dry   Damp   _   114   _   114   _   129" (Bot-168 Dry)  
OW11-174   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   Dry   _   _   _   _   _   _   _   Dry (171")  
TP1                   20   40   _   _   _   72"  
TP2                   21   26   30   38   _   42"  
TP3                   2   16   18   22   _   17"  
TP4                   16   28   26   32   _   32"  
TP5                   45   52   57   52   _   60"  
TP6                   62   70   60   70   _   77"  
TP7                   58   72   62   74   _   82"  
TP8                   16   23   _   _   _   33"  
TP9                   15   23   _   _   _   53"  
TP10                   29   32   _   _   _   (75") Damp  
TP11                   >144   >96   _   _   _   59"  
TP12                   >180   _   _   _   _   _  
TP13                   >96   _   _   _   _   _  
TP14                   94   76   _   _   _   77"  
TP15                   _   _   _   _   _   33"  
TP16                   31   42   _   _   _   45"  
OW20                           68   89"  
OW21                           61   57"  
OW22                           50   77"  
OW23                           49   72"  
OW24                           60   76"  
OW25                           110   111"  
OW26                           56   99"  
OW27                           48   (55") Dry  


(Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

colored map Hydrology/Drainage/Groundwater

Fig. 2-G
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8-21A-9-14: GEOTECHNICAL CHARACTERIZATION:linklink

Development of the geotechnical constraints characterization was designed to help recognize factors inherent to natural features which would potentially affect project planning, development and construction. The Boise foothills are prone to some geotechnical constraints which are characterized by slope failure, over-steepened slopes, excess hillside erosion and uncontrolled flooding.

Slope stability and expansive soils associated with the Boise foothill's volcanic assemblage as a geologic unit is known for its potential for both shallow (translational) and deep-seated (rotational) slope failures. The lower stratigraphic sequence of the volcanic assemblage is characteristic of low shear strength, especially along interface clay layers within the lower Terteling Springs Formation. The expansive (swelling) soils are readily recognized by the chocolate brown color and mud-cracked surface, and occurrence of these soils is confined to the outcrop area of the volcanic assemblage. It is believed clayey soils in these areas may have excessive low shear strength when saturated. In addition, the clays tend to have poor drainage, and some are moderately expansive.

Objective:The purpose of this analysis is to identify geotechnical-related constraints associated with the Hidden Springs area and compile the constraint information into a useful nontechnical map form for use by planners to guide future development. The data and maps generated by this study will aid in the formation of planning and development guidelines and construction standards that will:

1. Minimize the detrimental effect of natural constraints to the health, safety, and general welfare of the Hidden Springs project in individual site acquisition and/or development of real property; and

2. Encourage the most beneficial use of selected development areas and productive development of sites within each area.

Geotechnical
Constraint/Slope Maps:The geotechnical hazards map is a compilation and analysis of all available data that may identify potential natural constraints. As such, the natural constraints that have been identified are minor.

The slope map and description included in this Section illustrates and describes areas categorized by the following slopes:

    0-5 percent
    6-10 percent
    11-15 percent
    16-20 percent
    21-25 percent
    over 25 percent

Geotechnical
Constraints
Classification: The following constraint categories have been developed as a general guideline for general planning and development at Hidden Springs.

High Constraints Development of these areas will require more detailed study. Characteristic of severe slope failure, high ground water, over-steepened slopes, and rock topple.

Due to the fact that the basis for this classification is generalized and from secondary sources, the development and platting process as described in Section 4 will require more detailed planning at a site specific level. At that time, specific building envelopes and lotting criteria will be established to avoid or mitigate identified hazards.

Moderate Constraints
These areas can be developed with some limitations and/or restrictions. These areas may include ancestral slope failure, steep slopes, some swelling or fat clays. The restrictions placed due to the potential hazards are usually not serious enough to prevent development.

Low Constraints
These areas can be developed. Little or no development restrictions are associated with theseareas. These areas are located primarily south of Dry Creek and Currant Creek. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

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8-21A-9-15: VEGETATION:linklink
General Vegetation:The Hidden Springs site is composed of three (3) general vegetative zones:

* The moderate to steep slopes, ridges and gulches that are covered with sagebrush grass vegetation;

* The Dry Creek Valley bottomland, which has been converted to agricultural uses; and

* The narrow riparian zones along Currant Creek, McFarland Creek and Dry Creek.

The narrow riparian zones are fairly lush and dominated by large woody species including birch, various willows and red osier dogwood. Hackberry and chokecherry occur in the lower to midslope positions. Forbs include those that are commonly associated with the foothills environment. These are miner's lettuce, cleavers, Clematis ligusticifolia, and poa species, sticky geranium, stinging nettle, water pimpernel, cinquefoil and horsetail as well as sedges, grasses, bulrush and alfalfa.

Rare Plants:Rare plants studies were conducted in 1994 and 1999 as part of the site analysis and a report is included in the appendix to this community plan submittal. The reports discuss the isolated populations of Aase's onion that occur in two (2) areas on the upper, south facing slopes north of Dry Creek and at the southern portion of the property above Seaman's Gulch Road. In addition, the 1999 study revealed additional populations of Aase's onion and Wilcox's primrose on or immediately adjacent to the one hundred twenty (120) acre annexation area located at the southern portion of the site, which has been reduced to ninety seven (97) acres due to the transfer of twenty three (23) acres to the Cartwright Ranch planned community in 2007. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999; amd. Ord. 697, 8-26-2008)

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8-21A-9-16: WILDLIFE RESOURCES:linklink

Wildlife resources exist on or near the project site. Sitings indicate populations of big game on the property are relatively limited compared to the rest of the foothills area, but small game is abundant. A general overview of these resources follows.

Big Game: A resident herd of mule deer, approximately six to ten (6-10) animals, utilizes the property, most often seen on the slopes north of Dry Creek Road and the agricultural bottoms along the Dry Creek Valley. The property also serves as winter range for another twenty to thirty (20-30) deer, depending on the severity of the winter. More important winter range exists to the east between Rocky Canyon Road and Highway 21, where hundreds of deer are spread out along the foothills in a normal winter. With extreme weather conditions, more animals likely would be pushed down toward the valley bottom from the Boise Ridge and onto the Hidden Springs property. Recent (1986) range fires on the Hidden Springs property have reduced the amount of winter forage for big game by removing valuable shrub species, especially bitterbrush. The 1996 range fire affected only the area south of Dry Creek which has little winter habitat area. Much of the range north of Currant Creek has been taken over by three-awn grass, which has very little forage value for any wildlife species because of its high silica content. The potential exists, however, to rehabilitate the area by plantings of more preferred species of grasses, forbs and shrubs.

Some elk may winter on the upper portions of the property, especially during severe winters. They too could benefit from range rehabilitation efforts. A few pronghorn antelope, approximately six to eight (6-8) animals, exist in the area. They have favored the agricultural land in the valley bottom, but occasionally venture onto the sagebrush hills.

Upland Game: Upland game including quail, pheasants, mourning doves, chukars and gray (Hungarian) partridge are found in various habitat types on the property.Pheasants are most common nearest the agricultural land, while quail, chukars and partridge are more common in the grassland and sagebrush types. Water sources on the property, including the creeks, seeps and springs, are important to these upland game species, as well as other nongame wildlife.

Nongame: Raptors, such as red-tailed hawks, ferruginous hawks, Swainson's hawks, northern harriers, and kestrels, hunt over the property, and nest along Dry, Currant and McFarland Creeks. Several owl species also nest and hunt in the area. Great horned owls are known to nest in McFarland Creek. Prairie falcons are known to nest farther to the east, off the property, but may hunt on the sagebrush/grass slopes and riparian areas on the property. Fox, coyote and other various small mammals are found throughout the property, as are many species of birds that both nest and migrate through the area. Various reptiles and amphibians are found from the valley bottoms to the grassland and shrub slopes. The amphibians would be most closely associated with the riparian areas, seeps and springs, whereas the reptiles would generally be found in the drier, rockier areas. These species, along with the small mammals, are an important food source for the raptors and mammalian predators.

The most valuable habitat type in terms of numbers of different wildlife species are the riparian areas along Dry Creek, Currant Creek, and McFarland Creek, and in the small seeps and springs. Not only is the water source important, but the greater variety of plant species occurring in these areas means a greater variety of wildlife species. Many species rely on the abundance of shrubs and trees in riparian areas for escape cover, nesting, and food. Riparian areas also serve as important migration and travel corridors because of the cover they provide.

Threatened/Endangered Candidate Species: The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) has identified a list of endangered, threatened, and candidate species which may occur on the project site. Candidate species have no protection under the Endangered Species Act, but are included for early planning consideration. Candidate species could be proposed or listed during the project planning period, and would then be covered under the Act.

The gray wolf and peregrine falcon are the only officially endangered or threatened species included on the FWS list. The gray wolf was included based on "probable sightings in 1978 and 1981 within 10 km" of the property. Because of the rarity of wolves in Idaho, and especially southern Idaho, it is highly unlikely that a wolf would ever be found on the property. The peregrine falcon was included because of the proximity to the Boise urban hack site, and it is conceivable that the peregrines may fly over the property occasionally.

The pygmy rabbit, a C2 candidate species, was included as a "possible" occurrence on the property. Since there is little data on the distribution of the pygmy rabbit, it is not conclusive whether it is a resident species. A C2 species is one for which information indicates that a listing proposal may be appropriate, but for which conclusive data on biological vulnerability and threat are not currently available. Priority for listing is lower for C2 species than for C1 species.

Given the above conditions it is not likely that there are threatened or endangered species on the Hidden Springs property.

Sensitive Species: The State of Idaho also has a separate list of "Species of Special Concern". Species occurring in the Boise foothills, and which might be found on the subject property at some time during the year, and their primary habitats, include:

Mammals

*California Myotis - Sagebrush; feeds along riparian and water, roosts in mines, caves, and rock crevices.
*Fringed Myotis - Dry pine forests; roosts in buildings.
*Western Big-Eared Bat - Sagebrush, riparian, open pine forests, mountain shrub; roosts in mines, rock outcroppings, caves, dark buildings.
*Western Pipistrelle - Cliffs near water; roosts in rocks.

Birds

*Long-Billed Curlew - Open grasslands, marshes.
*Ferruginous Hawk - Open sagebrush, grassland, cultivated areas, riparian.
*Swainson's Hawk - Open sagebrush, grassland, cultivated areas.
*Merlin - Urban areas, riparian.
*Goshawk - Winters in valley bottoms in riparian zones.
*Mountain Quail - Riparian areas, dense shrubs.
*Flammulated Owl - Conifer woodlands, riparian.
*Northern Pygmy Owl - Dense riparian, mature forest, sometimes in open meadows, swamps, and cultivated areas.

Reptiles And Amphibians

*Western Ground Snake - Sagebrush.
*Ringneck Snake - Woodlands, grasslands, shrubby areas, rocky canyons.

Since these species are either rare or uncommon, it is difficult to estimate the importance of the subject property to their distribution. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

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8-21A-9-17: CULTURAL RESOURCES:linklink

Introduction: As part of the planning and permitting process, an archaeological sensitivity assessment of the Hidden Springs area was conducted. The purpose of the study was to determine areas likely to contain archaeological remains which would be affected by the construction and occupancy of the residential development. An examination of site forms, historic maps, and survey reports resulted in the identification of cultural resources within the project area and the delineation of areas of moderate, moderate to low and low sensitivity for archaeological remains. In general, the project area is expected to have a moderate to low sensitivity for sites based on topographic features, principally steep slopes and distance to water.

Identified Resources In
The Project Area:An architectural reconnaissance of the Boise foothills was performed as part of a regional irrigation study (Davis 1990). Three (3) structures in the Dry Creek Valley were recorded as part of that study. These structures include a wood frame hay shed (015216), a wood clapboard house with masonry foundation (015217), and an irrigation headgate structure located on a private ditch (015942). All three (3) structures occur in the Dry Creek flood plain on the Hidden Springs property. Overall, the quantity and nature of the structures suggests that this area received limited historic use associated with farming and livestock.

No prehistoric archaeological resources have been recorded within the Hidden Springs property boundary. A total of six (6) prehistoric and historic sites have been recorded within two (2) miles of the project area. All of these sites, consisting of prehistoric lithic scatters and historic foundations, are located on moderate slopes adjacent to Dry Creek in a portion of the creek with a very narrow flood plain.

Sensitivity Assessment:One of the primary goals of the Hidden Springs project is to be sensitive to any archaeological resources in the project area. A sensitivity assessment has been conducted focused on the relative potential for the various portions of the project area to contain significant prehistoric or historic archaeological resources. Trends were derived from examining the nature and patterning of known sites within the region, the results of surveys in similar environmental locations including surveys with an absence of cultural resources, and the physiographic and environmental characteristics of the project area. Using these data, the project area was divided into several parts equating to different degrees of archaeological sensitivity. Based on their differences, three (3) classes of sensitivity were defined: moderate, moderate to low, and low.

The Cultural Resources map depicts the range of archaeological sensitivity of the project area. The discussion below outlines the attributes of each of the sensitivity classes.

Moderate Sensitivity: The areas considered topossess moderate sensitivity include the Dry Creek flood plain (M1) and the gentle to modest slopes in the southeastern portion of the study area (M2). Both of these areas have flat to gently sloping topography and proximity to an intermittent stream. The flood plain is covered in recent alluvium and sites within the area are likely to be buried. However, conversations with a local farmer (personal communications, A. Ostalasa) indicate that no cultural materials have been found in this portion of the flood plain, although such materials have been recovered upstream from the project area. The Hidden Springs property has been cultivated heavily since the 1800s. Sites that could be found in these areas include seasonal plant collecting and hunting sites and historic sites associated with agriculture and grazing.

Moderate To Low Sensitivity: The areas considered to possess moderate to low sensitivity include the steep slopes adjacent to the Dry Creek flood plain and the mouths of the drainages issuing from the hills into the flood plain. The steep slopes contain some rock outcrops that could have been used as temporary shelters or storage areas. Representing a transitional area between the flood plain and the foothills, this sector is likely to contain a higher density of sites than the foothills, but a lower density than the flood plain. The mouths of the drainages would likely have received prehistoric use for hunting and some plant collecting associated with riparian habitats. These drainages also represent the access corridors to the foothills.

Low Sensitivity: This is the largest portion of the project area, accounting for approximately two-thirds (2/3) of the entire area. It contains moderate to steep slopes and ridge tops approximately one-half (1/2) to one and one-half (11/2) miles from Dry Creek with narrow intermittent drainages. It corresponds to the low sensitivity zones within the foothills of both the Northeast Boise Foothills project and the Hulls Grove project. In other areas, this zone exhibits low site density. Where sites occur, they tend to be historic and associated with mining, grazing, or other temporary activities. Prehistoric sites may include very short term hunting sites and may be represented by isolatedartifacts. Sites in this zone are most likely to occur on ridge tops and moderate slopes near the intermittent streams. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

map entitled "cultural resources"

Fig. 2-J
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8-21A-9-18: LAND USE PATTERNS:linklink


Existing land use patterns on-site and within one mile of the Hidden Springs property are consistent with the rural residential and agricultural land uses surrounding the Boise metropolitan area. Specific uses include dry land grazing, both irrigated and nonirrigated agriculture, rural residential (homesites on parcels from 1 to 25 acres), undeveloped rural land and a landfill parcel that is owned by Ada County. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

map entitled "land use patterns"

Fig. 2-K
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8-21A-9-19: SITE ANALYSIS: SUMMARY OF OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS:linklink

The analysis of site opportunities and constraints is derived from information presented in the pre-development conditions section of this Plan and summarized in the Site Analysis: Opportunities and Constraints map. As such, the site analysis is a composite overlay of the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) resource maps, background reports and field review by the development and planning team. The following outline highlights the natural and cultural factors which either singularly or in combination have presented assets or limitations in the proposed development of Hidden Springs.

Opportunities:Varied Topography: Slopes and landforms that range from shallow, open areas in the Dry Creek Valley floor to the gentle side slopes of the adjacent ridges, into the moderate or steeper slopes of the foothills and gulches provide a great diversity to the Hidden Springs property. These conditions afford the opportunity to sensitively incorporate development into the topography, integrating buildings, roads and infrastructure to minimize visual impacts and disturbance on the property.

Valley And Hillside Views: The views from the hillsides into the Dry Creek Valley and beyond are dramatic. From the upper slopes at the north side of the property, the views range up to one hundred eighty degrees (180°) toward the Treasure Valley and the Owyhee Mountains. At the south side of the property, the view across Dry Creek Valley features the backdrop of the foothills that immediately rise up to the high ridges, front range and mountains above this valley.

Creeks: The three (3) creeks - Dry Creek, Currant Creek and McFarland Creek - that run through the Hidden Springs property offer a number of opportunities related to wildlife habitat, trail/greenway corridors and visual amenities.

Access: The close proximity and routing of primaryroads to the property from the south and west via State Street, Highway 55, Seaman's Gulch Road, as well as Dry Creek Road from the east offer various routes for convenient vehicular access and traffic distribution.

Ground Water: A ground water resource in the Hidden Springs project vicinity is found in permeable sedimentary aquifers, with reported well yields of up to two thousand (2,000) gallons per minute in the Dry Creek Valley west of the project area. The ground water from cold water aquifers in the Hidden Springs project area is anticipated to be good quality for domestic use, with moderate levels of hardness and no water quality parameters in excess of EPA maximum contaminant levels (MCLs).

Constraints:Steep Slopes: A number of areas throughout the northern and southern portions of the site are constrained by slopes that are in excess of twenty five percent (25%). These slopes are primarily along the sides of the ridgelines that project into the Dry Creek Valley, some of the broad, open slopes at the northern portion of the property and the backslope that extends into McFarland Creek.

Visually Sensitive Hillsides: Due to the amount and exposure of slope area, including ridgelines, sideslopes and exposed hillside areas within the property, there is a significant amount of visually sensitive land.

Power Line: The power line that runs diagonally across the upper end of the northern portion of the site includes a significant easement and setback area that impacts views, reduces access and restricts land use along this corridor.

Flood Plain: The Dry Creek flood plain and floodway present a constraint related to buildable area and access within the valley floor.

Land With Limited Access: Certain portions of the Hidden Springs property are difficult to access due to steep slopes, ridgelines, stream corridors, lack of easements or adjacent property configurations and geological hazard areas.

Surface Water And Wetlands: Established drainages and springs including Dry Creek, Currant Creek and McFarland Creek should be isolated from all unnecessary construction activity. Road and utility crossings should be planned carefully with appropriate restoration. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
map "Site Analysis: Opportunities and Constraints"

Fig. 2-M

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8-21A-9-20: CENTRAL PLANNING CONCEPTS:linklink

Plans for Hidden Springs have been under preparation for several years. The plans presented in this document are the result of an extensive period of regional and site based analysis, a careful consideration of program and design alternatives and the study of other major projects in the country that are known for environmental quality and traditional community values. The plans were refined to reflect the suggestions of numerous public agencies and interest groups (including many neighboring property owners) who are concerned with land use and development in the Dry Creek Valley.

The resulting development strategy seeks to set a distinctive precedent for development in the Dry Creek Valley by establishing a small rural town and agricultural valley floor as the defining identity and amenity for an environmentally sensitive and visually dramatic planned community. The central planning concepts which make up this plan include:

Integrated Community: Hidden Springs will use innovative infrastructure technologies, resource management techniques and financial investment strategies to create a planned community which integrates the unique qualities of its site with responsible development and operations.

* Site disturbance will be minimized through the use of rural roadway designs, shared driveways, building envelope controls on rural residential lots, and a compact and efficient village center core.
* Water will primarily come from United Water Company and be distributed to a reservoir and a comprehensive distribution system. Lots greater than 2.5 acres in size will be served by individual wells.
* Sewage will be handled primarily through an aerated lagoon biological treatment system. Lots greater than 2.5 acres in size may employ individual septic treatment systems.
* The sewage treatment system will be managed by a qualified professional entity acceptable to the department of environmental quality and Central health district.
* Stormwater will be captured, dispersed and treated in a series of grassy swales and retention areas that will naturally filter pollutants and recharge the aquifer.
* On site commercial and community/recreation facilities will help to capture traffic and minimize the number of trips off site. Park and ride lots and vanpools will help residents get to work without using their automobiles.
* A wildfire prevention and management strategy, developed in coordination with North Ada fire and rescue and BLM will be implemented. Elements include use of noncombustible building materials, fire resistant vegetation, sufficient water supply and pressure, and access to permittee's areas.
* Advanced telecommunication connections to every home will enable residents who choose to work at home to communicate with their employers, schools, libraries and other information services without leaving the community.
* Extensive trails and bicycle facilities will encourage residents to walk and recreate within the community as well as have access to larger regional systems.
* An active community association will be established to ensure long term maintenance and operations are of the quality of initial improvements.
* The Hidden Springs boundary configuration together with the design and provision of essential public services enhances the ability of Hidden Springs to potentially be annexed or incorporated.

Maintaining Rural Character: Hidden Springs will maintain the existing rural character of Dry Creek Valley by conserving the agricultural scale and character of uses in the most visible portions of the site and concentrating higher density residential in the village center or more hidden side coves and valleys. The central portion of the valley floor will remain in agriculture under common control. The large south facing slope below the power line will be maintained as a wildlife management area and be enhanced with native vegetation. Above the power line, farm/ranch lots will serve as a buffer to this wildlife management area. The farm/ranch and rural lots will all have designated building envelopes which will allow the majority of the site area of these lots to remain in undisturbed native vegetation and open space. These designated building envelopes create a very low density of isolated homesites which encourages the use of shared driveways, individual wells and on site septic to minimize the impact of access and development of the homesites. The roadways outside the village center will be maintained as rural cross sections with natural shoulders and grassy swales, rather than urban curb and gutters. Project features such as the general store, community center and residential neighborhood entries will be designed consistent with the site's character.

Minimizing Visual Impact: Where development is proposed, buildings, utilities and roads will be carefully sited and screened to minimize their visual impact from both on site and off site adjoining properties. Techniques used to minimize visual impact include:

* Minimizing development in the highly visible valley floor and concentrating development in the more hidden side coves, gulches, and valleys.
* Minimizing development of the highly visible hillsides and keeping development either at the base or top of slopes.
* Siting ridgetop units in saddles and low areas to minimize "skylining" when development occurs at the top of slopes.
* Tucking buildings into topographic folds.
* Orienting roadway views to open space, agricultural parcels and the creek beds.
* Offsetting building pads to permit views between homes to open space, agricultural fields and the creeks.
* Using native vegetation in natural massings to blend homes with hillsides.
* Limiting heights, breaking up building massing and facades to minimize the visual scale of structures.

Conserving Natural Systems: Hidden Springs has been carefully planned to minimize impact on the natural systems in Dry Creek Valley and in some cases to enhance or improve natural systems which have been stressed by the existing ranch and grazing operations. Riparian areas will be maintained in their existing configuration or be enhanced.

Greenbelt or open space buffers have been designated between all riparian areas and nearby development. Wildlife corridors and big game winter range management areas have been designated with plans for enhancing these areas with vegetation to improve their ability to support big game winter feeding.

Greenbelt, regional and local trails have been designed to allow both wildlife and humans to move unobstructed throughout Hidden Springs and connect to corridors on adjoining lands. Approximately fifty percent (50%) of Hidden Springs will remain as open space. Existing vegetation will be maintained through the enforcement of building envelopes and related design guidelines on the rural residential lots. Natural drainageways will be protected through similar design guidelines regulating the grading and drainage of building parcels.

Protecting Water Quality: Water quality is integral to several planning concepts including transportation, water, sewer and facilities management.

Drainage from the road system will be contained and filtered through grass swales and natural soils where terrain allows. The water system will be metered and managed. Existing irrigation water rights will be used to continue farming activities and irrigate common areas. Irrigation losses will be minimized through a program of limited and controlled landscaping and planting. Wastewater will be treated primarily through a pressurized subsurface treatment system. All the water quality management features will be designed in accordance with regulatory standards and sited with soils and geology suited to that purpose. The existing springs on the south side of Dry Creek will be integrated into the overall site plan's common areas and agricultural areas. All of these systems will all be integrated into the overall management structure for the area.

These concepts, properly designed, constructed, maintained and managed, will offer a rare opportunity to have development without sacrificing water quality.

Developing A Distinctive Community: Hidden Springs has also been conceived with the intent of establishing an environment that fosters a high quality of development and strong community interaction amongst its residents. The village center will emulate the small town character which makes so many of Idaho's rural towns unique. The community will offer homesites with a broad range of size configurations and features. Hidden Springs will encourage a diversity of residents bound together with a common pride and identity in their community. While distinctive in their design and product type, residential neighborhoods will be linked by pathways and trails to the village center allowing the community center and general store to act as community wide gathering places. Recreational facilities such as playing fields, playgrounds, tot lots, trails and other open space features will provide numerous opportunities for residents to interact. Hidden Springs will also sponsor numerous community activities including farmers' markets, community gatherings, family oriented holiday events and educational sessions to encourage residents to explore the natural environment, meet their neighbors and share in community activities. The schools, general store and produce stand will also meet important community needs, reduce travel requirements and will provide the community with opportunities for residents to interact with their neighbors. Hidden Springs will provide Ada County and the Boise area with a model planned community that captures the rural character and traditional town values that have historically made Idaho's communities ideal environments to live in and raise a family.

Flexibility: The master land use plan, development standards and design guidelines contained herein are intended to depict the general nature and relative intensity of residential and nonresidential development at Hidden Springs, while allowing sufficient flexibility to permit detailed planning and design as development progresses through market cycles. The configuration of development parcels and phases may be altered from those shown on the master land use plan to accommodate detailed site conditions and revisions to the project's implementation strategy - providing that the reconfiguration does not conflict with the general intent or specific conditions described in this specific plan.

Specific conditions:

1. Residential density may be transferred among development parcels providing this transfer does not conflict with the general intent or conditions provided in section 8-21A-4 of this article, nor exceed the total project unit count of one thousand thirty five (1,035) units. Density transfers will be reflected in plats submitted for each phase.

2. A mix of residential uses is permitted in all development parcels.

3. Total commercial uses shall not exceed fifty thousand (50,000) gross square feet (GSF) of interior building area of village commercial uses and fifty thousand (50,000) gross square feet (GSF) of interior building area of agricultural commercial uses as defined herein. Public and community support uses are not included in these totals.

4. A major portion of the Dry Creek Valley floor will remain in use for agricultural activities.

5. There will be a designation of a major wildlife and winter range area, both north of Currant Creek, south of the power line, and west of Cartwright Road, as well as east of Cartwright Road and north of the power line.

6. The total acreage of the open space areas will not decrease below eight hundred ten (810) acres. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999; amd. Ord. 793, 12-7-2011)

http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165674
8-21A-9-21: PLAN OVERVIEW:linklink

Introduction: The primary objective of the Hidden Springs plan is to create a rural community in the tradition of Idaho small towns spread throughout the state's rural areas. The project will maintain the traditional character of Dry Creek Valley while allowing for low density residential development. The project will also protect and enhance the site's natural environment including riparian areas, groundwater recharge areas, open space/natural features, wildlife and winter range areas.

Homesites: The residential program for Hidden Springs is the result of a desire to create a rural community with a variety of housing options for prospective residents. The following overview provides a description of the six (6) residential options:

Farm/ranch lots - These are agricultural style lots intended to preserve rural character in the most visible portions of the Dry Creek Valley. The farm/ranch lots are intended to provide a unique residential opportunity in conjunction with carefully controlled farming or grazing operations.

Rural lots - These are lots which serve as buffers between farm lots and denser residential lots or between the village center and adjoining properties. Rural lots are intended to provide a transition from farm to village character.

Large lots - These are lots which are generally located on the site's moderately sloped hillsides. These lots vary substantially in size and configuration to respond to existing topography and minimize visual impact.

Regular lots - These are lots which generally occur in the side valleys and coves where relatively flat land hidden from distant views can accommodate higher densities. They may also be located in areas where smaller lots are most appropriate.

Village homes - These are reminiscent of the "in town" lots traditionally found in Idaho's agricultural towns and communities. These lots and homes built on them are intended to form a close knit residential village with strong pedestrian and community orientation like some of the established neighborhoods of Boise (such as the north and east ends).

Townhomes - These are the community's smallest lots, intended to provide alternative, attached or smaller detached homes which may appeal to seniors, empty nesters, first time home buyers, and/or single parents who prefer a small unit with limited yard area. Townhome lots are intended to be located in or within convenient walking distance of the village center.

Nonresidential Uses: Commercial support uses are accommodated via three (3) overlay zones as described below:

Village Commercial: This area provides for neighborhood businesses that are compatible with the adjoining village residential uses. It will serve the residents of Hidden Springs, the Dry Creek Valley and other nearby areas. A general store will be developed in the first phase of the project to initiate this village commercial zone and serve early residents of the project with staples and services.

Agricultural Commercial: This area provides for agriculturally oriented businesses (such as produce stands) that are compatible with agricultural activities and nearby residential uses. Businesses located in this zone will also serve the residents of Hidden Springs, the Dry Creek Valley and nearby areas.

Employment Centers: Hidden Springs anticipates that certain specialized types of employment centers may be attracted to this project because of its unique setting, rural character, high quality development standards and community values. Hidden Springs would like to reserve the right to incorporate future employment centers and related contemplated uses providing these uses adhere to the rigorous standards for compatibility and consistency described herein.

Other Uses: Public And Other Community Support Uses: Include the Community Center, schools, daycare facilities, post office, recreational facilities, the fire station, and an Equestrian Center. The community will also include a greenbelt along Dry Creek, a series of regional and local trails, and significant areas of open space.

Table 4: Land Use And Density


Land Use  
Gross Acreage1   Dwelling Units   Percent Of Total Dwelling Units  
Residential:        
  Farm/ranch lots   53   32   3 percent  
  Rural lots   94   2   0 percent  
  Large lots   360   278   27 percent  
  Regular lots   7   11   1 percent  
  Village homes   253   696   67 percent  
  Townhomes   6   16   2 percent  
Residential subtotals   773   1,035   100 percent  
       
Nonresidential:        
  Open space/parks   963      
  Community Center/school   29      
  Equestrian Center   0      
Nonresidential subtotals   992      
       
Totals   1,765      

Note:
1.The gross acreage as adopted by findings by the board of county commissioners is 1,163. The acreage breakdown will be corrected in a future ordinance.

This table represents anticipated land uses as of May 2003. The final allocation of uses may vary based on site and market conditions as allowed by this application and zoning ordinance. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999; amd. Ord. 509, 7-23-2003; amd. Ord. 697, 8-26-2008)

http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165675
8-21A-9-22: PHASING PLAN:linklink


The phasing plan for the Hidden Springs community outlines the anticipated sequence of development implementation. Initial phases of construction are relatively easier to identify and predict than subsequent phases will undoubtedly be adjusted in response to general economic conditions, market forces and absorption rates. The community is currently projected to take between seven (7) and twelve (12) years to build out.

The phasing plan map identifies the phases and sequence as anticipated at this time. The sequence reflects two (2) primary considerations: one is that a variety of densities and housing types are desirable for inclusion in each phase; another is that infrastructure is planned for development in an economically efficient manner. All land use types are included in each phase, with the exception of the preliminary assumption that townhouse units may not be developed until phases four and five. Phasing is planned in such a way that at the completion of each phase all essential public services needed to meet that and preceding phases are in place and that financing necessary for maintenance and operation of those services is assured. Hidden Springs will be developed in such a way that integrity of the community will be maintained at the end of each phase.

Phase One (1997-1999):Preliminary projections are for the first phase to include a mix of eighty (80) to one hundred sixty two (162) residential units drawn from the following categories: farm/ranch lots, rural lots, large lots, regular lots, and village home lots. The number of units in each of these categories will be based on market demand and the need to offer potential residents a variety of housing options.

This phase will also include roadway improvements to Seaman's Gulch Road, McFarland Road and Dry Creek Road south and west of Dry Creek with associated landscape andentry improvements. These improvements are all within the development boundaries. A general store will be constructed near the realigned intersection of Seaman's Gulch and Dry Creek. Utility systems to support this phase will also be constructed including a water reservoir, water distribution lines, sewage treatment system, and the storm water retention areas servicing the phase I development area. A significant portion of the trail system will also be developed.

Subsequent Phases:The rate of development following the initial phase, exact location and number of future phases, and types and number of units to be included in each future phase may be revised based on market demand, regional and national economic conditions and construction logistics. Analysis at this time indicates that approximately seventy five (75) to one hundred (100) units per year can be successfully absorbed. A seven (7) to twelve (12) year build out is therefore assumed. The anticipated completion time for each phase is as follows:

Table 5: Phasing

    Residential   Land  
Phase   Year   Units   Contained  
 
Phase 1   1997_99   162   184  
Phase 2   2000_02   134   58  
Phase 3   2003_04   102   24  
Phase 4   2005_06   138   41  
Phase 5   2007_08   132   62  
Phase 6   2009_10   105   40  
Phase 7   2011_12   176   195  
Phase 8   2013_14   86   169  
    1,035   773  


Anticipated population levels for each phase can be determined by multiplying the estimated number of persons per unit - 2.5 - by the numberof units anticipated in each phase.

As part of the county review of the Hidden Springs development that will occur every two (2) years, the developer will provide the director with a summary including: number of residential units and commercial uses platted to date; number of and type of units built by type; quantities and types of commercial and public facilities; a description of all infrastructure and services developed; and an updated outline of future phases. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999; amd. Ord. 509, 7-23-2003)
map entitled "Phasing Plan" here

Fig. 3-B
http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165676
8-21A-9-23: ROADS AND CIRCULATION:linklink

Overall Objectives:The design of the vehicular and pedestrian circulation system at Hidden Springs must meet the safety and functional intent of the Ada County Highway District (ACHDs) design standards while not compromising the aesthetic, environmental, and community building goals of the project. The circulation hierarchy and typical cross sections which follow strive to strike a balance between these two (2) requirements. The main objectives of the Hidden Springs circulation system include:

1. Provide a functionally efficient, safe, balanced, network of vehicular, bicycle and pedestrian facilities.

2. Maintain the project's rural character by using rural cross sections wherever possible.

3. Minimize disturbance of existing soils and vegetation.

4. Minimize runoff and associated erosion.

5. Use grassed swales wherever possible to disperse storm water, allow for maximum percolation and remove runoff pollutants.

6. Provide on-street parking throughout the Village Center.

7. Design street cross sections to a level that provides relative ease of vehicular movement, while also affording reduced speeds.

8. Accommodate "through" bicycle traffic on-street and "recreational" bicycle traffic both on street and on shared pedestrian/bicycle paths separated from roadways.

9. Allow sidewalks and shared pedestrian/bicycle paths to meander in pedestrian easements outside the road right of way for maximum design flexibility.


Table 6: Road Standards




Road Type  



R.O.W.  


Total Pvmnt Width  


Travel Lanes  

Shoulder Width (ea)  

Turn Lane/
Median  


Parking (Left)  


Sidewalk/ Bike Path  

Setback To Path (1)  



Curb Type  
Rural collector - typical
Rural collector - with turn land
Rural collector - constrained
Dry Creek Bridge crossing
Rural residential - typical
Rural residential - constrained
Village street - primary
Village street - residential
Village alley  
60'
60'
46'
60'
50'
40'
72'
56'
20'  
24'
36'
24'
26'
22'
22'
50'
34'
16'  
2@12'
2@12'
2@12'
2@13'
2@11'
2@11'
2@12'
2@10'
N/A  
3'
3'
3'
0'
3'
0'
0'
0'
2'  
None
12'
None
None
None
None
10'
None
None  
None
None
None
None
None
None
8'
7'
None  
10'
10'
 8'
10'
 8'
 8'
 5'
 5'
None  
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
6'
6'
N/A  
None
None
None
6" Vertical
None
12" Ribbon
6" Vertical
6" Veritcal
None  

Note: (1) Distance measured from face of curb.



Notes: (1) Pedestrian easement may or may not be contiguous. (Typical)

(2) The ROW shall be 80 feet for Cartwright Road southeast of its intersection with Dry Creek Road and for Dry Creek Road from its eastern terminus westward to and including the Dry Creek Bridge.


Rural Collector - Typical (Seaman's Gulch Road, Dry Creek Road, and lower Cartwright Road)   Rural collectors serve to collect traffic from and distribute traffic to village streets and rural residential roadways throughout the project. They will also serve to accommodate through traffic - although through traffic will be discouraged to help maintain the rural character and minimize environmental impact to the Dry Creek Valley. The typical section includes a 60' right of way with two (2) 12-foot travel lanes, two (2) 3-foot stabilized shoulders, and two (2) 8-foot maximum width grass swales. A single ten foot (10') pedestrian/bicycle path will meander in a pedestrian easement generally parallel to the right of way but not always contiguous to the right of way.  







Notes: (1) Pedestrian easement may or may not be contiguous. (Typical)

Rural Collector - With Turn Lane   For rural collectors where turn lanes are needed a twelve foot (12') center turn lane will be added as necessary to accommodate turning movement into project roadways. The section will also include travel lanes of twelve feet (12'). Otherwise the section will remain the same as the typical rural collector.  







Notes: (1) Pedestrian easement may or may not be contiguous. (Typical)

Rural Collector - Constrained (upper Cartwright Road): The rural collector constrained section mainly occurs in the upper portion of Cartwright Road. Inorder to maintain the visual character and minimize the site disturbance this section has been narrowed. The typical section includes a forty six foot (46') right of way with two (2) 12-foot travel lanes, two (2) 3-foot stabilized shoulders, and two (2) 8-foot maximum width grass swales. A single eight foot (8') shared pedestrian/bicycle path will be approximately parallel to the right of way in a separate pedestrian easement.






Notes: (1) Pedestrian easement may or may not be contiguous. (Typical)

Dry Creek Bridge Crossing: The Dry Creek Bridge Crossing will provide enhanced capacity, safety and the addition of separate bicycle/pedestrian facility across Dry Creek. The bridge can also serve as a primary visual identity element for the project, and may become a "covered bridge" with appropriate vertical clearance and architectural style. The bridge crossing will remain in its current location. Bridge width and associated grading should be kept to a minimum to prevent impact to the riparian corridor. The typical section includes a thirty two foot (32') wide bridge surface with two (2) 13-foot travel lanes. A single ten foot (10') pedestrian/bicycle path will be accommodated in a separate pedestrian/bicycle bridge crossing.






Notes: (1) Pedestrian easement may or may not be contiguous. (Typical)

Rural Residential -Typical: Rural residential streets include most of the roadways in Hidden Springs and will serve to carry local traffic to/from individual homesites. These roadways will be located and designed to discourage throughtraffic and maintain low vehicular speeds. The typical section includes a fifty foot (50') right of way with two (2) 11-foot travel lanes, two (2) 3-foot stabilized shoulders, and two (2) 8-foot maximum width grass swales. A single eight foot (8') shared pedestrian/bicycle path will meander beyond the ROW in a pedestrian easement as necessary.







Notes: (1) Pedestrian easement may or may not be contiguous. (Typical)

Rural Residential - Constrained: Constrained rural residential streets occur in steeply sloped areas that cannot handle the width required for the typical rural residential section. This section includes a forty foot (40') right of way with two (2) 11-foot travel lanes, no stabilized shoulders (but a 12 inch ribbon curb included in the 11 foot travel lane) and one grass swale on the uphill side of the street. An eight foot (8') pedestrian/bicycle path will be located on the downhill side of the street with a wood guardrail separating it from the street for safety purposes.





Village Street - Primary (Seaman's Gulch Road, Dry Creek Road, and McFarland Road within the Village Center): Primary village streets will serve as the "main streets" of the Village Center and will accommodate the potential for commercial uses, community center, school and village residential uses along their frontage. Village streets should establish a comfortable environment for pedestrians with slower vehicular speeds, frequent vehicular stops, on-street parking and tree-lined sidewalks. The typical section includes a seventy two foot (72') ROW with two (2) 12-foot travel lanes, one ten foot (10') turn lane (where necessary) or planted median, two (2) 8-foot parallel parking lanes, and five foot (5') sidewalks set back from the curb with a five foot six inch (5'6") tree lawn on both sides of the street and within the right of way.




Village Residential (All other streets within the Village Center): Residential village streets should also establish a comfortable pedestrian environment with slow vehicular speeds, frequent vehicular stops, on-street parking and tree-lined sidewalks. Because turning volumes for these streets should be low enough to eliminate the need for turn lanes, the typical section includes a fifty six foot (56') right of way with two (2) 10-foot travel lanes, two (2) 7-foot parallel parking lanes and five foot (5') sidewalks set back from the curb with a five foot six inch (5'6") tree lawn.





Village Alley: Alleys will be created to eliminate driveways on village streets. Fewer driveways on village streets means more on-street parking, more resident interaction, less utilitarian infrastructure and no unsightly garages lining residential streets. Alleys will also be used for utility easements, trash collection and emergency vehicular access. The typical alley section includes a sixteen foot (16') paved lane with two foot (2') shoulders on each side. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

Map "Roads And Circulation Plan"

Fig. 3-C
http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165677
8-21A-9-24: TRAFFIC STRATEGY:linklink

Hidden Springs has been carefully planned to minimize traffic impacts on surrounding roadways and concentrate off-site trips to the south and west of the community. Six (6) key elements of this strategy are:

Project Density:It is anticipated that approximately seventy five percent (75%) of the population of the Hidden Springs Community is projected to be located on the south side of Dry Creek Road. The traffic analysis of Hidden Springs concludes the highest percentage of trips into downtown Boise, Eagle and south to I-84 will occur within the existing road system to the south and west of the project: on Seaman's Gulch Road, to Hill Road, Gary Lane to GlenwoodRoad and State Street; and on Dry Creek Road west to Highway 55.

Location Of Village
Center:The Village Center with its commercial uses, schools and other community activities will capture traffic within the community and reduce the need to go outside the community for goods and services.

Trip Reduction Strategy:A trip reduction strategy is included as part of the overall Hidden Springs Traffic Strategy. This strategy is centered around the concept of travel demand management, which will result in trip reduction based on providing commercial and community support uses in the Village Center, telecommuting, recreation facilities, a park and ride lot, an extensive bicycle and pedestrian path system, and vanpooling.

Rural Road Sections:As part of the rural character of the community, rural road sections (designs) will be utilized to the greatest extent possible and based on approval of these sections by ACHD. These sections will not have curbs, gutters or sidewalks. Also, these roads will have a parallel path system that will accommodate bicycles and pedestrians thereby reducing vehicular trips and improving both the safety and alternate transportation options in the community.

Future Growth Scenario:Due to the topography of the area, it is anticipated that the bulk of future development within Dry Creek Valley will occur to the west of Hidden Springs. Strategic placement of Hidden Springs densities at the south, and placement of the Village Center at the west end of the community will lead this future trend and route the majority of community traffic toward transportation corridors to the population centers and services to the west.

Traffic Focus And
Diversion:Hidden Springs supports traffic planning and design measures that will direct traffic to corridors with adequate capacity and future additional potential. These measures include: diversionary intersections at Hill Road and Gary Lane, Hill Road and 36th (both recently adopted by ACHD), and Cartwright Road and 36th Street (future) that will direct traffic to the south rather than along Hill Road and Harrison Boulevard; and plans for new and expanded north-south corridors on Eagle Road and on routes being evaluated in the Bench to Valley Study.

The widening of 36th Street and connection of Veteran's Memorial Parkway through to Curtis Road and the I-84 connector will result in a significant reduction in potential traffic on State Street and through parts of the North End. Also,the future connection of Gary Lane and Glenwood Road through to Cole Road and the mall area will provide another major north-south connection that will ease pressures on the North End.

These improvements will greatly increase the already good accessibility of Hidden Springs. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
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8-21A-9-25: TRIP REDUCTION STRATEGY:linklink

Travel Demand Management Through Trip Reduction Strategy: One of the primary concerns surrounding development of the foothills is the potential traffic impact on existing neighborhoods. The Hidden Springs Specific Plan places major emphasis on the concept of Travel Demand Management. The Plan incorporates trip reduction strategies to promote trip containment and trip reduction to minimize impacts on existing transportation networks and existing neighborhoods. In addition, the Specific Plan focuses traffic away from areas such as Harrison Boulevard, where traffic capacity is currently strained. As previously noted, recent decisions by ACHD concerning new north-south connections on Curtis Road and Glenwood Street will reduce potential traffic pressures on the North End.

Hidden Springs is focused around a Village Center which contains recreational, institutional and commercial activities. These may include: general store, hardware, cafe, real estate office, daycare, grade school site, and a community center. The initial phase will contain approximately 80-162 units, and will include construction of the general store.

Other elements of the community and design will support trip reductions. Hidden Springs will incorporate the most advanced practical telecommunications technology to encourage and promote telecommuting. The site will also have a pedestrian and bicycle trail system for internal circulation and connections to the Village Center which will access the wider foothills trail system. Hidden Springs will also have a park and ride lot near the Village Center.

Bicycle security facilities will be installed at several locations in the Village Center and at the park and ride lot to provide residents complete nonautomobile transportation.

Upon the issuance of the 300th, 500th and 700th residential building permits, Hidden Springs will provide the local matching funds for the purchaseof a van for project residents to use in Ada County Highway District's vanpooling program. Hidden Springs will provide a bus shelter in the Village Center for use when the regional transit district provides bus service to the area. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
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8-21A-9-26: OPEN SPACE AND TRAILS STRATEGY:linklink

Overview: Hidden Springs includes a strategy for creating a comprehensive system of trails and paths to allow pedestrian, bicycle and equestrian access to open space and outlying foothill areas. Internally, this system will connect the residential neighborhoods with the Village Center, community open space and the greenbelt along Dry Creek. These internal trails will in turn provide external connections to regional open space and the trail system along Currant Creek, McFarland Creek and Dry Creek. Five (5) highlights of this strategy include:

Safety: The path and trail system will generally be contiguous although not always directly parallel to the community road system. This will allow pedestrians and bicycles to circulate independently of vehicular traffic providing a greater degree of safety.

Trip Reduction: Providing alternative modes of travel is one of the primary goals of Hidden Springs. Developing trails and distinct internal connections between the open space, neighborhoods and the Village Center, as well as access to community facilities and recreation areas for pedestrian and bicycle traffic will reduce the number of vehicular trips necessary within the project area.

Regional Connections: The Hidden Springs trail system will make a major contribution to regional public access and trail systems. Hidden Springs will implement the first phase of a greenbelt trail that runs along Dry Creek, from Bogus Basin to the city of Eagle. It will also implement major pieces of the foothills regional trail system that provides access across the western foothills and beyond.

Wildlife Protection: Wildlife is considered an important natural resource of Hidden Springs. Therefore, protection of wildlife habitat is an important component of the trails and open space strategy. Major trails and paths within the community typically occur along the perimeter of wildlife management areas and riparian corridors. This will allow pedestrian, bicycle and equestrian access to these areas, while also maintaining the integrity of the habitat's larger area. Intrusions or disturbance by development will be minimized.

Wildfire Prevention: Strategic alignment of the trail system around the perimeter of neighborhood and wildlife management areas will provide emergency access for homeowners and firefighters while serving as fire breaks to limit the spread or incidence of wildfire. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

Open Space and Trails Plan

Fig. 3-D
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8-21A-9-27: WILDFIRE PREVENTION STRATEGY:linklink

Background: The Hidden Springs community has been carefully planned with a strategy for the prevention, control and rapid extinguishment of wildfires. This program is intended to address the legitimate concern about residential development in the foothill areas as it relates to public safety and wildfire prevention, while maintaining the functional and aesthetic parameters of the community. Development of a program for wildfire prevention has been an effort involving members of the planning team and local fire experts. This strategy has been reviewed with fire and resource experts since the 1996 wildfire affecting the Hidden Springs property. The consensus is that the strategy remains valid and highly desirable as an approach to dealing with fire hazards in the foothills. Seven (7) primary criteria have been identified in establishing a sound wildfire prevention program for this project:

Available Water: Two (2) aspects of water systems have been considered in the planning and development of this community. The first is the quality and quantity of water available for domestic use. The second is the type of system and quantity of water available for fire protection. The availability of water for fire protection on the Hidden Springs community will exceed the minimum storage requirement of five hundred fifty thousand (550,000) gallons. Fire flow will also exceed the minimum one thousand five hundred (1,500) gallons per minute with additional buffering for peak hour demands.

Water mains will be sized to accommodate fire hydrants at a maximum of five hundred foot (500') spacing in residential areas and about three hundred fifty foot (350') spacing near commercial and community structures. Hydrants will be strategically located near emergency access easements to the residential perimeter and wildlife management areas, as well as periodically along roadways. Booster pumps to ensure adequate pressure and backup power are also part of the design of the water distribution system.

Lots greater than 2.5 acres located north of the power lines will be served from individual wells, subject to approval by the required jurisdictional agencies. Each residential building will be required to have a fire sprinkler system meeting NFPA 13D supplied from their individual well. Fire hydrants connected to the public water system are located approximately one and one-fourth (11/4) miles south of the 9th addition access on Cartwright Road. Fill and return time for a firetruck would be ten (10) minutes or less.

Proximity Of Fire Services: Fire service will be provided by the North Ada fire and rescue district. The bureau of land management also has responsibilities for fire protection in the foothills because of extensive public lands in the area. A fire station site will be provided in the village center in the first phase of the project. When the district constructs a station on the site, volunteers from Hidden Springs may be asked to supplement the staff at the new station. The new facility is envisioned by the district to house a pumper, tanker and grassfire equipment (that have adequate capacity to serve Hidden Springs, the Dry Creek Valley and adjacent areas) at its completion.

Emergency Vehicle Access: Primary roads within the community will be designed to provide access for emergency vehicles. Provisions will be made for access by firefighting equipment and personnel from two (2) directions into each residential neighborhood. All roads will have a maximum gradient of ten percent (10%). Spurs that serve those areas occurring off the primary roads will terminate in cul-de-sacs, with adequate turnarounds for emergency vehicles. All roads will be maintained by Ada County highway district to its standards. Emergency access easements to residential perimeters and major open space areas will be provided at strategic locations, including ends of cul-de-sacs and between adjoining lots.

Site Planning: Careful site planning for fire protection at the perimeter of the residential neighborhoods as well as local protection for individual homesites is a critical function of the wildfire prevention program for Hidden Springs. As such, a comprehensive system of roads, trails, riparian greenways and open preserves is an integral part of each neighborhood. This system provides strategic emergency access points and firebreaks at the neighborhood perimeters that allow firefighters to confine a fire to a small area. To reduce local exposure to hillside areas, the residential lots in each neighborhood will be low density, with a limited building envelope on the most level portion of the site. Also, setbacks will be required between all structures and adjacent slopes.

Noncombustible Construction Materials: Architectural design guidelines for the Hidden Springs project will require that noncombustible materials such as tile/slate, asphalt composition shingles, and standing seam metal be utilized for roofing materials. These guidelines will also require any highly combustible material used for exterior siding, paneling, fencing and other wood structures to be factory treated with an industry rated fire retardant chemical.

Landscaping And Fuel Modification: The landscape planting guidelines for Hidden Springs will include provisions for wildfire prevention in conjunction with site planning, aesthetics, water requirements, native plants and ongoing maintenance programs. The goal of these guideline provisions will be twofold. First, to implement a comprehensive landscape design that will reduce fuel volume in the common and perimeter areas, and second, to provide individual homesites with a framework for fuel modification. The guideline criteria for the fuel modification in the common areas and residential neighborhoods of Hidden Springs are: planting fire resistant plant materials; establishing irrigated landscape envelopes within each homesite; developing vegetation buffers that provide transition to adjacent native vegetation and establishing criteria for clearance between buildings and plantings within each site.

Following the wildfire on a portion of the Hidden Springs property in the summer of 1996, a revegetation effort is getting underway. In consultation with wildfire and vegetation experts, a mix of fire resistant grasses and plants will be planted in several stages over the coming months.

Maintenance And Management: Ongoing maintenance, management and enforcement of the wildfire prevention program will be the responsibility of the community association and governed by the covenants, codes and restrictions for the Hidden Springs community. The design guidelines for the project will be administered by a design review committee for site planning, architectural and landscape design compliance with the wildfire prevention program. Additionally, public information and education programs about wildfire prevention will be developed in cooperation with the North Ada fire and rescue district and the bureau of land management. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 793, 12-7-2011)
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8-21A-9-28: WILDLIFE STRATEGY:linklink

Wildlife Preservation And Enhancement Techniques: The Hidden Springs project will take an active approach to optimizing the site's ability to support a wide diversity of wildlife species. The master land use plan includes the following wildlife management and enhancement techniques:

1. Designation of a major wildlife area and winter range area both north of Currant Creek, south of the power line and west of Cartwright Road as well as east of Cartwright Road and north of the power line. Hidden Springs will work with the bureau of land management (BLM) and the Idaho department of fish and game (IDFG) to enhance vegetation in this area including supplemental seeding and seedling planting of sage and bitterbrush. Hidden Springs will allow IDFG to post peak seasonal closure signs surrounding this winter range area. This includes posting peak seasonal closure signs at the trailheads to this area.

2. Designation of multiple portions of the site as permanent open space including:

* The agricultural area in the valley floor.
* The Dry Creek riparian corridor.
* Most of the south facing slopes north of Dry Creek.
* The Currant Creek riparian corridor.
* The McFarland Creek riparian corridor and surrounding valley floor.

3. Designation of several trail/migration corridors including:

* The Dry Creek regional greenbelt and migration corridor.
* The Currant Creek regional trail and migration corridor.
* The McFarland Creek trail and migration corridor.
* A series of local intracommunity trails including a loop trail around development to the southwest, a trail connecting Currant Creek to Dry Creek and a trail connecting the power line to Currant Creek.
* Working closely with neighboring landowners, as the Grossman family has been, to encourage them to extend these trails and corridors through their properties to the federal lands beyond.

4. Location of low density farm/ranch and rural lots as buffers near those areas of the site which accommodate greater intensities of wildlife species.

5. Designation of building envelopes on all large, rural and farm/ranch lots to minimize the disruption of wildlife habitat in the form of native groundcover vegetation and existing soil and drainage patterns.

6. Restricting fencing in rear lot buffer areas which abut major wildlife migration corridors and the preserved winter range area.

In addition, the project's design guidelines (section 8-21A-6 of this article) will:

1. Encourage the clustering of buildings and related landscape to maximize contiguous open space.

2. Limit fencing across critical migration corridors to a maximum height and minimum kickspace as recommended by Idaho fish and game. If barbed wire fencing is used, the bottom wire shall be smooth.

3. Require all new landscape material on lots outside building envelopes to be drought tolerant, native and from a list of less palatable or nonpalatable plant species.

4. Encourage replanting of wildlife food species and plant species which enhance critical habitat.

5. Prohibit the installation and require the complete removal of noxious plants and weeds within the designated development envelope by the builder or homeowner.

6. Require builders to employ "best practices" grading techniques including incremental phasing/reparation, dust controls, grading, limit fencing, etc.

7. Limit modifications to natural drainageways to those which are absolutely necessary or those which increase the effectiveness of the drainageway in carrying stormwater and accommodating wildlife.

8. Prohibit exposed dumping and composting (covered composting is permitted).

9. Require residential trash to be kept inside the house, garage or appropriate enclosure until the morning of trash collection. Encourage trash containers to have attached lids.

10. Require dogs and cats to be in latchable carriers or on leashes when outside the residential or commercial lots during critical migration periods as determined by Idaho fish and game.

11. Prohibit contractors from bringing dogs to construction sites.

12. Limit motorized vehicles from roads and trails (4 wheel drive vehicles, snowmobiles and motorcycles) except for construction, fire, emergency and maintenance vehicles.

13. Include wildlife educational materials and an acknowledgment of wildlife presence and the potential for property damage in the project's homeowners' documents.

14. Post big game crossing signs at major crossing points along Cartwright Road and Dry Creek Road (maximum 4 signs). Where wildlife and development conflicts continue to occur despite these measures, Hidden Springs will work with local, state and federal agencies in an attempt to resolve these conflicts. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

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8-21A-9-29: WATER SUPPLY:linklink

A water infrastructure extension agreement to provide Hidden Springs potable water is in place between United Water Idaho, Inc. (United Water), and Hidden Springs. Water transmission, storage and the first phase of the water distribution facilities have been built, tested and are available for service.

Lots greater than 2.5 acres located north of the power lines will be served from individual wells, subject to approval by the required jurisdictional agencies.

Water Supply Requirements - South Of Power Lines: The average demand is estimated at approximately 0.275 million gallons per day (mgd) or about two hundred (200) gallons per minute (gpm). This demand is equivalent to a withdrawal of three hundred (300) acre-feet. Approximately forty (40) to forty five percent (45%) (135 acre-feet) of this annual usage will be consumptively used by irrigation, with the remainder returning to the aquifer as recharge from the subsurface wastewater treatment system. The peak day demand is estimated at 1.4 mgd, or approximately one thousand (1,000) gpm.

Sources: Existing system extension. An agreement has been reached with United Water Company to supply water to the project from this source, a booster pump station would be built at the storage reservoir, and a water main extended to the project area. A second storage reservoir on the north side of the summit between Seaman's Gulch and Dry Creek provides gravity service to the water system described in the following section.

Water Supply Requirements - North Of Power Lines: The average demand for an individual home varies with occupancy. Estimates are based on the number of bedrooms within the home.

Sources: Individual wells on each lot will be the source of water for domestic and irrigation uses.

One Hundred Twenty Acre Annexation Area: United Water has agreed that the annexation area is serviceable as approved by the Idaho public utilities commission. United Water will supply water to Hidden Springs from United Water's existing source supply through the new transmission facilities. The annexation area has been reduced to ninety seven (97) acres due to the transfer of twenty three (23) acres to the Cartwright Ranch planned community in 2007.

Conclusion: It is anticipated that the development of Hidden Springs will not negatively impact groundwater supply in the vicinity. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999; amd. Ord. 697, 8-26-2008; amd. Ord. 793, 12-7-2011)
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8-21A-9-30: WATER SYSTEM:linklink

Introduction: As discussed in section 8-21A-9-29 of this article, the primary water supply for the Hidden Springs project has been developed as an extension of United Water Company service lines. Lots greater than 2.5 acres located north of the power lines will be served by individual wells, subject to approval by the required jurisdictional agencies.

United Water Service General Description: The primary water system has been designed in accordance with the Idaho regulations for public drinking water systems, title I, chapter 8 section 1-8200.1, as required by the Idaho Code 39-118 or 50-1326 and the fire code as adopted by the state of Idaho. The system will supply water as the primary agent for fire extinguishment.

United Water Service Demand Analysis: A plan has been prepared for the transmission and storage facilities as well as to guide the design of the distribution facilities for each phase of the planned community. The estimated maximum daily total consumption for all phases is one thousand seven hundred fifty (1,750) gallons per minute, which includes fire demand and a system leakage allowance. The peak demand for any one hour period for all phases is three thousand three hundred fifty (3,350) gallons per minute. The transmission and storage facilities have been designed to accommodate expansion of the system beyond Hidden Springs' original entitlement and can accommodate one hundred twenty (120) additional dwelling units.

United Water Service Storage: Storage for domestic consumption and fire flow demand will be provided from the existing Hidden Springs reservoir. This three hundred fifty thousand (350,000) gallon tank is built, tested, and in service. A second reservoir may be constructed if required to maintain system pressure in development areas north of Dry Creek at relatively high elevations.

United Water Service Zones: Hidden Springs encompasses domestic services that will range over approximately nine hundred (900) vertical feet elevation. This range of elevation will require several service zones. The IRPDWS require a minimum design pressure of thirty five (35) pounds per square inch (psi) and a maximum pressure of one hundred (100) psi. These pressure criteria will be achieved through the use of eight (8) service zones, with average daily pressures ranging from forty (40) psi at the top of each zone to ninety (90) psi at the bottom of each zone.

Booster pumps located at zone boundaries will supply domestic demands to the higher zones and fill the storage tanks as required north of Dry Creek. Once the tanks are filled, the boosters will be cycled off and supply will come from the tanks down through pressure reducing stations into the lower zones.

United Water Service Distribution Mains: Water mains are required to connect supply, storage and domestic service zones. The IRPDWS require that hydrants be connected to mains six inches (6") and larger in diameter. Other mains will be larger as required for adequate fire flows. The fire code requires that hydrants be spaced at intervals not to exceed five hundred feet (500') for residential fire demands. Hydrant spacing can vary somewhat to accommodate intersections and larger lots. Hydrant spacing near commercial and community structures will be decreased to about three hundred fifty feet (350') or as local conditions require.

United Water Service Meters: This system includes meters for all users. The meter installation includes an automatic readout device located near the meter or at a convenient location nearby. These meters, data storage devices and database software together with a rate structure that promotes conservation are the heart and soul of the water system management structure.

United Water Service To Units: Hidden Springs is committed to providing service to all residential units in the community. The water distribution plan map shows the conceptual layout of the water distribution system and is not intended to document a complete layout of the entire community system. During design and plotting of individual phases, specific design and location for all service lines will be finalized and documented in the appropriate documents.

Individual Wells: The large lots located north of the power lines will have individual, on site wells that will provide domestic water and fire sprinkler water to meet NFPA 13D requirements. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999; amd. Ord. 560, 8-24-2004; amd. Ord. 793, 12-7-2011)

insert map of "Water Distribution Plan"
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8-21A-9-31: WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT:linklink

Water quality protection is a central strategic aspect of Hidden Springs. Certainly, the local and state environmental regulations will not tolerate any foreseeable pollution to either ground water or surface water. More important, the prospective market for land ownership in the proposed development will not tolerate pollution or even the potential for pollution of surface water and ground water. Water quality management is reflected throughout this application in theland uses, in the infrastructure and in the way the owner's association operates. The following is a brief summary of the various water quality management practices incorporated throughout this application:

Water Conservation:The most effective way to manage water quality is to conserve water. Hidden Springs policies include conservation of ground water used for domestic supply and for irrigation. These conservation measures are intended to minimize the amount of natural ground water brought into the consumption or usage cycle, leaving the most water at the source and the ground water untouched. Conservation will take several general forms. Water will be conserved by limiting the area and type of irrigation allowed throughout the development. Domestic supply will be limited by promoting or requiring the use of water-saving showers and fixtures within each individual house or commercial unit. Lastly, all sources of use throughout the proposed development will be metered and a monitoring system established to track the use and abuse of water supply throughout the development. Other specific water conservation strategies will be applied where appropriate and are discussed in the following section.

Road And Drainage Design: Roads have been laid out throughout Hidden Springs in a manner that takes advantage of local terrain and soil conditions. The roadway concepts in this application include rural road section with large grass swales and various runoff features on-site which are used to collect, treat and dispose of excess drainage. Runoff from the site will not exceed predevelopment levels. Runoff from hard surfaces on lots is intended to be retained on the lot site in grassed areas or swales provided in or adjacent to the building envelope. On larger rural lots, individual drainage retention and disposal features may take other forms. Generally, all lots will be graded with retention swales strategically located on each lot.

Land Use Configuration: The absolute foundation for rational development including water quality management is to utilize the natural soils and geologic features on-site to their optimum. This type of planning is the basis of the configuration presented in this application. Water quality management becomes a subconscious element of the layout process.

Wastewater Treatment System: The wastewater treatment system constructed for Hidden Springs is a sophisticated aerated lagoon biological treatment system. For some individual lots greater than two and one-half (2.5) acres, individual septic tanks and drainfields may be used. All collection, treatment, and disposal features have been planned, designed and constructed in accordance with current regulatory guidelines and mandates. These guidelines and mandates have been established to protect ground water quality. The good soils and geologic conditions anticipated on this proposed site offer an excellent opportunity to implement these wastewater treatment facilities without any impact on ground water.

Implementation Strategy: Hidden Springs will demonstrate the technical feasibility of successful water quality management. If the technical feasibility is to become reality, certain implementation milestones should be scheduled. In preliminary design the following milestones are important:

It is anticipated that the development of Hidden Springs will not negatively impact surface and ground water quality in the vicinity.

During construction an environmental field coordinator should be on-site. That person's responsibility should include observations to assure that construction activities and constructed facilities are in conformance with the intent and recommendations of the water quality management concept introduced in this application.

After construction a suitable monitoring and management structure must be in place. It must have the authority and ongoing resources to administer the water, wastewater treatment, and drainage facilities.

Qualified professional management entities will be retained to supervise operations, maintenance and monitoring of the water system and wastewater treatment system. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999)
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8-21A-9-32: WATER CONSERVATION:linklink

Water conservation is an important component of Hidden Springs' goals; and as such a comprehensive water management program will be established for the project. The goal of the water conservation plan is very simply to reduce the amount of water diverted, used and consumed in the proposed development.

The water conservation plan is presented below. Detailed implementation measures will be developed and available for review as part of the planning process on a phase by phase basis. The measures will adopt water conservation measures for both exterior and interior uses.

The water conservation plan is as follows:

* Building/landscape envelopes on all residential lots larger than ten thousand (10,000) square feet.
* Use of drought tolerant grasses and shrubs.
* Efficient irrigation equipment, scheduling and management.
* Soil amendment in landscape areas.
* Mulch cover in landscape areas.

The interior water conservation plan will include covenants or architectural standards that seek to implement interior water conservation. The plan will consider the following conservation measures:

* High efficiency (low flow) showerheads, toilets and faucets.
* Water meters and a water usage database that facilitate real time analysis.
* Timed controller for specific uses such as lawns.

Based on experience and current literature, it is reasonable to expect that water usage can be significantly reduced below what is "normal" for the area. The planning target for conservation is ten (10) to fifteen percent (15%) reduction from these "normal" predicted demands. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

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8-21A-9-33: SEWER SYSTEM:linklink

General Description: Hidden Springs plans for a wide range of land uses and densities. The land uses in this specific plan are tailored, in part, to the ability of the soils and geology to support those uses. Land with soils and/or geology that cannot reasonably support development are left open and undeveloped. Land with soils, geologic and/or topographic limitations that can support only limited or low-density development are set aside for the larger rural lots. The more intense land uses are reserved to those areas where solid geology and topography are well suited to those land uses.

General Description: Hidden Springs plans for a wide range of land uses and densities. The land uses in this specific plan are tailored, in part, to the ability of the soils and geology to support those uses. Land with soils and/or geology that cannot reasonably support development are left open and undeveloped. Land with soils, geologic and/or topographic limitations that can support only limited or low density development are set aside for the larger rural lots. The more intense land uses are reserved to those areas where solid geology and topography are well suited to those land uses.

Planning for sewage collection, treatment and reuse requires attention to several goals.

* Use a method of collection that is well suited to the largely rural nature of the project.
* Use a method of treatment and disposal that is suited to the soils, geology and hydrogeology of the area.
* Use the treated wastewater in a manner that is consistent with the goal of protecting groundwater quality.
* Do not discharge treated wastewater to surface water.
* Use a system that does not depend on treatment and disposal through existing systems in Boise and Eagle.
* Use a system that lends itself to professional management of operations and maintenance.

Lots greater than 2.5 acres located north of the power lines will be served through individual systems with the same general processes described above.

A sewer collection network, central sewage lift station, wastewater treatment plant and treated wastewater distribution pipeline system has been built, tested and is available for service. The design, construction and operation of the system are regulated by the Idaho department of health and welfare-division of environmental quality (IDHW-DEQ).

Individual Systems: The portion of Hidden Springs north of the power lines is single-family homes on rural and farm/ranch lots. Generally, and in this case, individual wastewater treatment systems are both practical and well suited methods to manage domestic wastewater. In the current proposed layout, the rural and farm/ranch lots have been sited on soils that do provide good conditions for a limited number of individual septic tanks and drain fields. The areas for individual septic tanks and drain fields will undergo three (3) levels of review before they are ultimately permitted; those levels of review are:

* Planning,
* Preliminary, and
* Permitting.

The planning level of review is that which can be expected as a result of this application. Information presented in the predevelopment conditions section in this application provides a good description of the expected soils, geology and groundwater conditions on the site. As mentioned, these findings have guided the siting of various uses. They also provide information suitable to establish general technical feasibility wastewater treatment systems and pressurized, subsurface dosing systems in the areas identified for their usage. More specific information will be required in subsequent review levels.

After this application is submitted and approved, the applicant will then proceed with preliminary design and final design for each successive phase. The initial phase preliminary design will include additional study for the area included in these phases. Typically, the preliminary study will include the following tasks:

* Coordinate with the Central district health (CDH) and the division of environmental quality (DEQ) to confirm the specific scope of study for both individual and community and surface disposal systems.
* Open soil observation pits and prepare soils logs and strategically position groundwater observation and groundwater monitoring holes.
* Evaluate soils, topography and geology.
* Develop design, sizing and location recommendations for all systems.
* Provide findings to CDH for approval.

Community System: In the areas where lots are generally smaller than two and one-half (2.5) acres, a wastewater treatment system is used.

The sewer collection network is a conventional gravity flow network of pipelines that flows to a central sewage lift station. The sewage lift station pumps the sewage to the wastewater treatment plant. The wastewater treatment plant is an aerated lagoon biological treatment system with a treated wastewater storage impoundment. The biologically treated wastewater is stored through the nongrowing season until it can be beneficially used for irrigation during the growing season. The biologically treated wastewater will be pumped from the storage impoundment through a filtration and disinfection system. The filtered and disinfected water will supply an irrigation distribution pipeline network for common area landscape and agricultural irrigation. The final treated wastewater will be applied at agronomic rates for beneficial use to maximize the reuse of the water as a resource and protect groundwater quality. The wastewater collection and treatment system is depicted on the sewer system plan.

System Diagram: The sewer system plan map, shows the conceptual layout of the community sewer system.

The figure also shows the general area to be served with sewer as defined by the estimated development envelopes. Therefore, the limits of areas served by sewer may not be precisely concurrent with development areas shown in the master land use plan map, which depicts the conceptual lot boundaries. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999; amd. Ord. 793, 12-7-2011)
insert map of Sewer System Plan here

Fig. 3-F

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8-21A-9-34: STORM DRAINAGE SYSTEM:linklink

General Description: The natural drainage flows are altered by development of an area in three (3) basic ways. First, drainage patterns are redirected and concentrated by grading and the construction of roads. Second, flows are increased by the installation of more impervious surfaces than previously existed. Finally, the quality of the water is impacted by the runoff from pavement surfaces and fertilized landscaped areas. The storm drainage system proposed for Hidden Springs will safely transport concentrated flows to management facilities strategically located to filter nutrients and attenuate increased flows.

The diagrammatic drainage plan depicts internal drainage shed boundaries and possible locations of major management features.

Design Criteria: The design of drainage facilities associated with the Ada County road system falls under the jurisdiction of the Ada County highway district. The design of the drainage facilities for Hidden Springs is depicted in the proposed road section designs.

Conveyance Systems: Redirection and concentration of drainage flows will primarily be a result of construction of the road network serving the project. A combination of rural and urban road sections are proposed, depending on the development intensity of a particular area. In rural section areas, grassed roadside swales will be the primary conveyance with culverts crossing at low points and other critical locations. Curb and gutter will convey drainage to a more formal storm sewer system of inlets and culverts in areas where urban road sections are proposed. In each case, the conveyance systems will be designed to deliver the storm water runoff to the management facilities while minimizing erosion.

Management Facilities: The storm water management facilities will be the primary drainage feature for mitigating the increased flows generated from Hidden Springs. These features will range from level swales graded parallel to the contour where flows are small to detention areas where higher densities will create larger flows. Other examples of these facilities include seepage trenches, dry wells and ponds. A number of site specific factors will effect the type of facility chosen. Less dense development, as in the northeast portion of the development, will generate lower flows requiring smaller structures in local applications. More dense development areas will include regional facilities for management due to higher anticipated flows and site availability. Soils and slope conditions, proximity to existing drainageways and size of the drainage area will also dictate the selection of facility.

These management facilities will serve a second purpose of water quality management, which isdiscussed below.

Water Quality Management: The quality of storm water runoff has become one of the most sensitive issues associated with land development. Residual materials from pavement surfaces, excess nutrients from fertilized landscaped areas and sediments carried with higher velocity flows contribute to the degradation of surface water quality. A number of strategies will be employed at Hidden Springs to minimize that degradation and to treat the water prior to discharge to the natural drainageways. Other sections of this application address management of landscaping. Relatively narrow road sections are being proposed to minimize pavement areas while still providing safe travel ways. Rural road sections are being emphasized to allow the treatment of runoff as close to the source as possible, specifically in roadside grassed swales.

As previously discussed, all surface water runoff will be directed to management facilities for the control of runoff quantities. Hydrologic studies and management facilities will be updated and/or expanded as land use changes occur. Detaining runoff in these facilities will also allow suspended sediments and nutrients to settle. Between the source and these management facilities, erosion and sediment control techniques will be utilized to "pretreat" the runoff. Vegetated roadside and culvert discharge swales will provide nutrient uptake. Small check dams will slow channel flow velocities. Riprapped aprons will slow velocities and disperse concentrated flows from storm drainage systems. The emphasis will be on keeping the concentration of flows to a minimum and dispersing those concentrated flows in vegetated swales at every opportunity. Not only does this promote nutrient uptake but it also promotes infiltration and ground water recharge.

Surface water quality will be addressed both during and after construction of development improvements. In addition to the methods previously discussed, temporary features employed during construction will include silt fences, strawbale barriers, siltation basins, sediment traps and other proven and appropriate best management practices. The temporary mitigation program will focus on limiting the area of disturbance and treating the surface water as close to the source as possible. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999)
"Drainage Plan" map

Fig. 3-G
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The section below has been affected by a recently passed ordinance, 902 - MISC ZONING AMENDMENTS. Go to new ordinance.

8-21A-9-35: SHERIFF, FIRE AND EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES:linklink

Sheriff: Police protection will be provided to the residents of Hidden Springs through the Ada County sheriff's department. All services and operations of the department will be coordinated through the main office at the city/county law enforcement building. It is anticipated that services for Hidden Springs will be through an agreement that is similar to the departmental contract with the city of Eagle. The department will be encouraged to provide a sheriff station outpost at the fire station described below.

Fire Services: Fire services will be provided by north Ada fire and rescue district. The district will operate out of the fire station presently under construction in the village center.

Emergency Medical Services: Emergency medical services will be provided by aid units from Ada County. The closest station to Hidden Springs is at the headquarters station, adjacent to the north Ada fire and rescue district headquarters. This facility will adequately serve the community without the need for additional facilities. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999)
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8-21A-9-36: LANDSCAPE STRATEGY:linklink

The landscape of Hidden Springs is intended to knit the natural and cultural themes of the community together through careful layout, planning and design. The goal of the landscape strategy will be to establish an impression of Hidden Springs that is both visually appealing and cohesive as well as being a successful living environment. This will project a positive and active character for the community that emphasizes its opportunities, its facilities and the vitality of its residents.

Objectives: Five key objectives that provide a framework for implementing the functional, aesthetic and technical parameters of the landscape are as follows:

* Develop a rural theme that builds upon the character, location, traditions, history and self- sufficiency of Hidden Springs. Utilize traditional landscape elements such as hedgerows, windrows, orchards, groves, grasslands and cultivated land as functioning components within the community. This will reinforce the theme while providing the foundation for phased implementation or sequencing of the project.

* Create an environment that is harmonious with the regional climatic conditions. This will be achieved through careful selection of plant materials that express the desired aesthetic qualities while meeting the maintenance and durability requirements of the project. A general list of plants that meet these criteria is included in Section 8-21A-9-42 of this Article.

* Exercise prudent use of water resources by implementing water conservation measures in the landscape. This will include implementing the principles of xeriscaping; setting limits on landscaped and irrigated areas within common areas and residential lots; and utilizing high-efficiency, low-volume irrigation systems.

* Establish a clear and logical orientation to the neighborhoods, and open space areas within Hidden Springs. Providing a sense of entry, a sense of place and a sense of community by understanding the needs in each zone is a critical landscape planning and design factor. These areas can be characterized as outlined below.

Entries: At Seaman's Gulch and Dry Creek Roads to the west and Dry Creek Road to the east, entries to the community will be characterized by open, country roads lined with native grasses punctuated by select plantings of deciduous tree groves that will reinforce these as community gateways.

Riparian Areas: The Dry Creek, Currant Creek and McFarland Creek corridors will be characterized by naturalistic placement of trees and shrubs that will enhance and replicate the existing riparian environment while providing wildlife habitat.

Agricultural Areas: Within the Dry Creek Valley and Seaman's Gulch Road area cultivated croplands with orchards, windrows and hedgerows will be reestablished.

Rural Residential Neighborhoods: Irrigated landscape envelopes will contrast with enhanced native shrubs and grasses outside those envelopes.

Preserves: Open grasslands with scattered native scrub and tree cover. These areas will remain in their natural state and will be selectively enhanced as appropriate to the land and wildlife management parameters of the project.

Town: Traditional street trees in planting strips and medians with front and rear yard domestic gardens in the residential and commercial lots.

* Provide for ongoing maintenance and management of the common area landscapethrough the homeowners' association, CC and R's, and coordination with ACHD for road and right of way maintenance.

* A list of approved species will be developed specific to the Hidden Springs site that reflects water conservation and wildfire strategies and will be a component of the design guidelines. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

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8-21A-9-37: ESSENTIAL PUBLIC SERVICES AND ANTICIPATED FINANCING PLAN:linklink

Introduction:The Planned Community District regulations anticipate that a planned community will be developed in phases over time. (See Section 8-21A-9-22 of this Article.) The regulations require that each phase of development include sufficient essential public services to serve the anticipated population of that phase and to provide for integration of such services into the planned community. This Section describes the phasing of improvements, estimated costs of the essential public services of each phase and the alternative methods of financing the costs of installing and maintaining these essential public services as well as mitigating material negative economic impacts of the community.

As described in the Phasing Plan, the first phase of development will feature a mix of unit types within the areas south of Dry Creek. Subsequent development will occur in the balance of the project south and north of Dry Creek.

The first phase of development has been identified and will include a total of 80_162 residential units. It is anticipated that this phase would include a mixture of the following lot types: farm/ranch lots, rural lots, large lots, regular lots, village homes, and town homes.

Sufficient infrastructure, including essential public services, will be developed initially to support this phase of development. Subsequent development will occur together with the necessary infrastructure, at a pace and within site areas in response to market conditions and the need to have an integrated community at the completion of each phase. For purposes of this Section, the financing plan is considered for the first phase and the combination of all subsequent phases.

The remainder of this section considers each of the essential public services.

Roads And Streets:The proposed roads and circulation plan includes several categories of improvements:

* Project Improvements: Representing the rural collector roads which provide the primary access and circulation within the project.

* Residential Site Improvements: Which provide the secondary roads within the individual project areas.

The street improvements associated with the first phase will include:

* Project Improvements: The realignment, widening, and paving of Dry Creek Road, and Seaman's Gulch Road as realigned within the site area. However the existing alignment of Dry Creek Road will remain in its present condition and location.

* Residential Site Improvements: The construction of rural residential local and secondary roads as necessary to serve first phase developments.

Anticipated Costs
The projected costs of these improvements are estimated to be:

  Phase I   Later Phases   Total  
       
Project cost   $ 336,400.00   $ 900,000.00   $1,236,400.00  
Residential sites   1,051,000.00   7,947,860.00   8,998,860.00  
Total   $1,387,400.00   $8,847,860.00   $10,235,260.00  


The project and residential site improvements will be dedicated to ACHD.

Impact fees assessed on the project are estimated to be $3,737,901.00 as follows:

Development Type   Units   Assumed Category   Impact Fees/Unit   Total Fee  
Regular   Extraordinary  
           
Farm/ranch lot   30   Single-family>1,500 sf   $1,039.00   $2,589.00   $108,840.00  
Rural   20   Single-family>1,500 sf   1,039.00   2,589.00   72,560.00  
Large lot   205   Single-family>1,500 sf   1,039.00   2,589.00   743,740.00  
Regular lot   483   Single-family>1,500 sf   1,039.00   2,589.00   1,752,324.00  
Village home   162   Single-family>1,500 sf   802.00   2,589.00   549,342.00  
Town home   135   Multi-family   734.00   2,589.00   448,605.00  
Commercial   30,000   Mixed commercial   2,083.00/
1,000  
  62,490.00  
          $3,737,901.00  


*From Road Impact Fee Schedule - Far Rural.

These fees will be applied to capital improvements as per the "Extraordinary Impact Fee Agreement" of August 19, 1998 between ACHD and Hidden Springs.

Mechanism For Initiating And Maintaining Each Phase
As approved by ACHD in the subdivision improvement agreement, each phase will include sufficient improvements to serve the new lots. These improvements will include the necessary project level road improvements.

Mitigation Of Adverse Economic Impacts
No adverse economic impacts were identified for the highway district as a result of this project.

Water System:Phasing Of Improvements
The proposed water system plan includes two (2) categories of improvements: supply/storage and distribution (see water supply and water system sections 8-21A-9-29 and 8-21A-9-30 of this article for complete description of water supply and system alternatives).

The water distribution system will include water for domestic use as well as water for fire protection. These facilities can be extended incrementally as roads are built and lots developed.

Cost
The projected costs of these improvements are estimated to be:

  Phase I   Later Phases   Total  
       
Project cost   $ 224,000.00   $ 84,000.00   $ 308,000.00  
Residential sites     787,000.00   5,815,235.00   6,602,235.00  
Total   $1,011,000.00   $5,899,235.00   $6,910,235.00  

Mechanism For Initiating And Maintaining Each Phase
The initial phase of development is planned to include all improvements necessary to provide service.

The subsequent phases will respond to market conditions. Plans for each subsequent phase will include sufficient improvements to serve the new lots. These improvements will include the necessary reservoirs and distribution system.

The operator of the water system is United Water Company, which is responsible for all operation and maintenance.

Mitigation Of Adverse Economic Impacts
Fees for service will be set to cover operating costs, fund depreciation and provide a return on investment, consistent with regulations set by the Idaho public utilities commission.

Sewer System:Phasing Of Improvements
The proposed wastewater treatment plan calls for a community wastewater collection and treatment system based on an aerated lagoon biological treatment system with a treated wastewater storage impoundment. On some lots larger than two and one-half (2.5) acres, individual septic tanks will be used. The first system would be developed as part of the first phase.

Cost And Financing
The projected costs of the improvements are estimated to be:

  Phase I   Later Phases   Total  
       
Project cost   $ 500,000.00   $ 667,213.00   $ 1,167,213.00  
Residential sites   553,000.00   2,006,021.00   2,559,021.00  
Total   $1,053,000.00   $2,673,234.00   $3,726,234.00  

The cost of individual septic tanks for large lots is not included here, but will be a cost to home builders.

Mechanism For Initiating And Maintaining Each Phase
The initial phase of development is planned to include all improvements necessary to provide service. The subsequent phases will respond to market conditions. Plans for each subsequent phase will include sufficient improvements to serve the new lots. These improvements will include the necessary community collection and treatment systems.

The Hidden Springs sewer company will operate and maintain the wastewater treatment system.

Mitigation Of Adverse Economic Impacts
Fees for service will be set to cover operating costs and fund depreciation, and there should not be any adverse financial impact.

Utilities:Utilities include power, telephone, cable TV and natural gas. These services must be extended to and throughout the development and will be located beneath or adjacent to streets and roads as were depicted in the roads and circulation plan map. These extensions will occur as development proceeds. The portion of the cost to be borne by the project is estimated to be:

Phase I   Subsequent Phases   Total  
$184,000.00   $1,318,000.00   $1,502,000.00  

The cost of these improvements will be funded privately by the developer and potentially by capital investments by utility providers.

Mitigation Of Adverse Economic Impacts
Fees for service will be set to cover operating costs, fund depreciation and provide a return on investment, consistent with regulations set by the Idaho public utilities commission.

Landscape And Trails:The trails/open space plan and landscaping plan include a variety of landscape features and recreational amenities: a greenbelt, pedestrian easements, trails, an equestrian center, preserve areas, a community center with recreational fields, and a community park.

The cost of the landscape, trail and recreational improvements are estimated to be:

  Phase I   Later Phases   Total  
       
Landscape   $214,000.00   $ 958,000.00   $1,172,000.00  
Trails   156,000.00   168,000.00   324,000.00  
Recreation     20,000.00     600,000.00     620,000.00  
Total   $390,000.00   $1,726,000.00   $2,116,000.00  

These facilities will serve both residents of the community as well as other citizens of the county and elsewhere.

Maintenance of the open space and recreation features are anticipated to be provided by the community association or the developer. The improvements would be held in common ownership and maintenance would be funded by community association fees. Alternatively, some or all of these amenities could be conveyed to the county parks department or some public or quasi-public entity upon completion.

Mechanism For Initiating And Maintaining Each Phase
Landscape and recreational features will be developed in phases along with the other infrastructure items. The features developed in each phase are created to assure the marketability of the project. The additional membership of homeowners as development proceeds, will provide additional community association resources to maintain the facilities.

Mitigation Of Adverse Economic Impacts
There are no adverse economic impacts identified for providers of these public services.

Schools:The economic impact analysis included in this application considers the school facility needs associated with the community. The development would require the following portion of the capacity of the indicated prototype school facilities:

  Phase I   Subsequent Phases   Total  
       
Elementary   6.2%   34.1%   40.3%  
Junior high   1.9%   10.7%   12.6%  
High   1.0%   4.2%   5.2%  

Initially, the students can be bussed to existing schools.

The Boise School District estimates the cost of a prototype facility to be approximately:

Elementary   $ 6 million  
Junior high   $16 million  
High school   $25 million  

Accordingly, the cost attributable to enrollment for the development at build-out would thus be:
Elementary   $2.4 million  
Junior high   $2.0 million  
High school   $1.3 million  

The district has recently constructed a new elementary school (Bogart Lane) and junior high (Gary Lane) which will in part service the Hidden Springs area. The district will likely require additional sites as growth continues in this general area. A school site will continue to be made available to the district.

The cost of new schools is typically funded by bond issues. However, with the development of the community, the new homeowners will share in paying off unfunded capital costs (outstanding bonds issued to construct existing school facilities) as well as the capital costs of additional facilities constructed in the district.

Mechanism For Initiating And Maintaining Each Phase
As noted, the district has recently constructed new schools in the general area of the project. This is an outcome of a recent successful bond election.

Mitigation Of Adverse Economic Impacts
As presented in the economic impact analysis, the lag in collection of property tax would result in required expenditures exceeding revenues in the first year after homes are sold in phase I. However, the surplus in the second year would offset that deficit, and surpluses would exceed expenditures in every year thereafter.

Fire District:It is estimated that Hidden Springs (including the 1999 annexation of 120 acres reduced to 97 acres due to the transfer of 23 acres to Cartwright Ranch planned community in 2007) would require thirty five percent (35%) to forty percent (40%) of the service capacity of a new fire station. Such a station would also serve the growing population outside Hidden Springs.

A new fire station is presently being constructed in Hidden Springs. The station will be operated by the north Ada County fire and rescue district (NACF&R)

Cost And Financing Of Improvements:
A new fire station is estimated by the district to cost:

Building   $612,180.00  
Equipment   337,000.00  
  $949,180.00  

Mechanism For Initiating And Maintaining Each Phase:
As per the agreement between Hidden Springs community LLC and north Ada County fire and rescue, fifty percent (50%) of the tax revenue collected by NACF&R from the development area will be used to pay back Hidden Springs for the construction of the new station.

Mitigation Of Adverse Economic Impacts:
The economic impact analysis concluded that there would be no adverse impacts related to the development.

Other Jurisdictions:The economic impact analysis did not identify any other capital facility needs. Further, there were no adverse impacts from operation other than a shortfall to the county in the first year after homes are sold, because of the lag in recognizing increases in assessed valuation. However, services could be provided at adequate levels within the revenues available in that year.

Financing Plan:The costs of the essential public services necessary for the community and the additional amenities discussed above will be provided either by the developer of the project or from a local improvement district (LID) or other governmental or quasi-governmental agency formed for the specific purpose of providing such financing.

With respect to an LID or other governmental or quasi-governmental agencies, as a potential source of financing for a variety of improvements, including public roads and streets, sewer, water, landscaping, trails and other community facilities "The governing body of any municipality has the power to make or cause to be made any one or more of the following improvements. [Excerpts only]

1) To establish grades and layout, establish, open, extend and widen any street, sidewalk, alley or off street parking facility;

2) To construct, improve, repair, light, grade, pave, repave, surface, resurface, curb, gutter, sewer, drain, landscape and beautify any street, sidewalk or alley;

5) To plant, or cause to be planted, set out, cultivate and maintain lawns, shade trees or other landscaping;

8) To acquire, construct, reconstruct, extend, maintain or repair parks and other recreational facilities; ..."

Under an LID, bonds would be issued to finance improvements with bonds repaid through assessments on the Hidden Springs property. The developer would be responsible for assessments on each parcel until it is sold to a homebuilder and ultimately a homeowner.

A local improvement district could be formed by Ada County, the Ada County highway district or other applicable governmental entity with the approval of sixty percent (60%) of property owners (in this case the developer). Bonds are issued, secured by the development parcels. If the developer or subsequent homebuilder or homeowner fails to pay assessments, the local improvement district forecloses on the property. The risk of adverse impact on the issuing agency because of foreclosure is reduced in three (3) ways:

* By statute, the value of the assessment cannot exceed the value of the real property including improvements. There should be adequate value received in the event of foreclosure.

* As a practical matter, the value of the property should greatly exceed the assessment.

* A guarantee fund can be set up, funded by a bond process to provide monies to make bond payments.

In summary, an LID or LIDs may be used to fund some of the essential public services and other amenities. As noted earlier, whether such improvements are financed privately by the developer or through an LID, the costs of the improvements are borne by current and future property owners.

Financial Assurances:The applicant, Grossman Family Properties, is an affiliate of Grossman Company Properties, one of the premier developers in the western United States. Founded in 1964 by Sam Grossman, a twenty five (25) year resident of Idaho, Grossman Company Properties has been involved in the acquisition, development and management of shopping centers, hotels, mixed use developments, residential and mobile home communities, as well as agricultural and land development projects throughout the west for over thirty two (32) years.

Grossman Company Properties is also one of the financially healthiest and most active developers in the country. Current development projects include the recently completed thirty three million dollar ($33,000,000.00) renovation of the Arizona Biltmore hotel and resort in Phoenix, Arizona. With over one hundred fifty five (155) employees and offices in Phoenix, Arizona, and Boise, Idaho, Grossman Company Properties is one of the most experienced and successful developers in the west.

As part of the application for each plat of Hidden Springs, a detailed outline of anticipated construction costs and operating and maintenance budgets will be submitted. The plat application will also identify specific responsibilities and appropriate assurances for financing of improvements and ongoing maintenance and operation of essential public services. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999; amd. Ord. 697, 8-26-2008)

http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165691
8-21A-9-38: ZONING MAP:linklink

The official zoning map is on file with the Ada County development services department. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999)
http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165692
8-21A-9-39: HIDDEN SPRINGS LEGAL DESCRIPTION:linklink

The Hidden Springs planned community legal description is as set forth in Ada County ordinance 705. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997; amd. Ord. 377, 7-28-1999; amd. Ord. 697, 8-26-2008)
http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165693
8-21A-10: DESIGN REQUIREMENTS:linklink
http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165694
8-21A-10-1: PURPOSE AND INTENT STATEMENT:linklink

Overall Purpose/Intent:The following guidelines illustrate the general level of design and development control which Hidden Springs intends to apply to development of the residential and nonresidential parcels within the overall project. A design review committee (DRC) will be set up to review site plans, architecture and landscape designs in Hidden Springs. The DRC reserves the right to modify these standards to be more restrictive or different in design character, as long as general project intent and theme is maintained. DRC responsibilities will include the review of building plans, elevations, materials, colors, fencing, signage, lighting, landscaping and parking arrangements prior to permit application to Ada County.

Specific responsibilities and standards will be further defined in the Declaration of Protective Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions (CC&Rs) which will also serve to control development at Hidden Springs. The DRC shall have sole authority in determining compliance with the CC&Rs and design guidelines. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165695
8-21A-10-2: ARCHITECTURE:linklink

Hidden Springs is not intended to be developed with one prevalent architectural style. Variety in the architecture is encouraged. An emphasis, however, will be placed on indigenous architectural styles, the use of quality materials and complementary relationships between building and site design features.

1. Building scale and height should relate to topography, lot sizes and setbacks. A mix of one and two (2) story units in the rural residential neighborhoods will be encouraged. Custom homes on slope sensitive lots should use hillside adaptive design techniques such as post andbeam construction and daylight basements to minimize streetside and rear yard facade exposure. Building heights in village and town home residential neighborhoods and nonresidential uses may be taller but should have a massing and scale compatible with adjoining residential uses.

2. The visual bulk of hillside residential development should be reduced so structures do not stand out prominently when seen from a distance. Building form should conform to site topography, and not overshadow natural site features. Step structures with slope, and cut into hillsides should be utilized to reduce visual bulk.



Step building with natural grade to
reduce visual bulk.









3. Building height should be minimized on highly visible ridge areas by avoiding multi-story houses that "skyline" on ridges and by locating residential buildings so as not to impact views near ridges.

4. A mix of housing styles and types is encouraged. No adjacent single-family detached home will be permitted to have the same plan, elevation or color. Variety in elevations and materials is essential.

5. Homes on farm/ranch, rural and large lots shall have side or rear-entry garages (garage doors not directly facing the street). Homes on village lots shall provide rear-entry garages where access is provided.

6. Private exterior living spaces such as porches, decks and patios are encouraged in the design of each unit in the village and town home neighborhoods.

7. Roof pitch variations are preferred. No flat roofs or rock covered roofs are permitted. Tile, concrete tile, architectural grade composition shingle or other materials approved by the DRC are permitted. Wood shake roofs are prohibited.



Porches




8. Passive solar designs, energy and water conservation measures are encouraged.

9. Building materials and color schemes should blend with the natural landscape of earth tones and grassland vegetation but minimize fuel potential for wildfires. The use or incorporation of fire resistant or treated wood, stone, and/or brick on exteriors is encouraged. Material changes, fenestration changes and variations of wall and window surface planes are also encouraged. In order to avoid the appearance of a false applique, no material changes shall be allowed on corners or where structures abut common areas. If material changes occur, they must occur at logical changes in building form.

10. Windows shall be sensitively placed to protect privacy of adjacent residences.

11. View corridors are critical to and from all open spaces. The siting of buildings, accessory structures, fences, etc., and their impact on views and adjacent uses shall be carefully considered.

12. Mechanical equipment on roofs, aboveground transformers, satellite dishes, active solar panels, utility equipment and loading, service and storage areas shall be screened from view from the streets, pathways, public areas and adjacent uses. Trash enclosures and maintenance structures shall be designed to be compatible in style, materials and colors with the main building and shall be of masonry type construction. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165696
8-21A-10-3: SITE DESIGN:linklink

Parcel developers, builders and lot owners will be encouraged to use innovative and environmentally responsive techniques in designing the final configuration of lots, buildings, roadways, drives, etc. These techniques include, but are not limited to, the following:

1. Minimize development intensity in the highly visible valley floor and concentrate development in more hidden valley coves.



Low density development of valley floor.

2. Minimize development on highly visible hillside slopes. Keep development predominantly at the top and base of slopes.



Minimize hillside/ridge development.













3. Cluster buildings to maximize contiguous open space and minimize disruption to native vegetation.

4. Tuck buildings into topographic folds and site ridge-top units in saddles to minimize "skylining".



Tuck development into topographic fields.

5. Offset and stagger building envelopes on rural residential lots to permit views between units and prevent the formation of a uniform wall of building faces.



Offset building pads to permit views between units.




6. On village and town home lots, buildings should align on build-to setback line to create a uniform edge to the town center streets.

7. Keep views at the terminus of roadway intersections open to amenities, open space and creek beds.

8. Avoid steep slopes (>25%) and soils with poor bearing capacities.

9. Site buildings to capitalize on passive cooling/heating. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165697
8-21A-10-4: SITE GRADING AND DRAINAGE:linklink

Introduction:Lots in the residential neighborhoods will be individually graded in a site sensitive manner to reduce impacts. Cut and fill slopes along roadways will be carefully designed to minimize visual impacts. Grading and revegetation guidelines are outlined below and shall comply with Ada County and central Health Department requirements. Grading and drainage should be kept to a minimum and should be performed in a way that respects significant natural features and visually blends with existing topography. Carefully analyze existing soil and naturally occurring drainage patterns prior to development to minimize grading and its impact on the overall drainage basin. Detailed geotechnical and hydrological reports may be required prior to grading activities.

Guidelines:1. All disturbed areas shall be revegetated or restored, with proper erosion and dust control methods. Stockpiling, erosion and loss of topsoil shall be minimized.

2. Revegetation shall be done as soon as possible after finish grading has been completed, usually in early Spring or in the early Fall.

3. Topsoil that is removed shall be centrally located with respect to construction phasing. The stockpile may also be protected by seeding, watering, mulching or covering.

4. All grading shall follow Ada County requirements. Slopes of 3:1 or less are preferred with overall finish grades blending with natural land forms to the greatest extent possible. Slopes greater than 3:1 shall be stabilized through such means as terracing or planting. Custom retaining walls and landscaping must be used to screen cut and fill areas. Minimize grading on slopes greater than twenty five percent (25%). Soften slope banks through use of contoured grading at toe and top of slope. Provide rounded transitions and variable slope gradients. Avoid rounded long slopes with sharp transitions.

5. Individual site sensitive grading, as well as appropriate hillside adaptive construction, shall be provided on hillside lots, and shall be reviewed and approved by the DRC.

6. Detention basins, silt drains and fences and temporary revegetation should be used in conjunction with other earthwork operations for sediment and drainage control during construction.

7. Avoid construction in areas with unstable soils that may require costly construction and greater impacts to natural conditions. Provide erosion control measures on cut and fill slopes, and on highly permeable soils. Locate individual septic systems carefully to avoid ground water impacts.

8. Use naturally occurring drainage patterns to avoid increased runoff and potential erosion problems. Use grass swale and detention ponds for gradual release and ground water recharge.



Utilize naturally occurring
drainage patterns.

9. Encourage split-level building to minimize grading and complement natural slope.

10. A graded slope that exceeds thirty three percent (33%) or eight feet (8') in height shall have special slope treatment and or retaining walls that stabilize the slope and minimize scarring. Minimize tall visible retaining wall structures by stepping with grade. Use natural materials (stone, wood, etc.) and natural colors for retaining walls wherever practical. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165698
8-21A-10-5: LANDSCAPE DESIGN:linklink

Introduction:The landscape, both existing and proposed, is an integral element of the rural character at Hidden Springs. The preservation and enhancement of traditional landscape elements, such ashedgerows, agricultural fields, tree groves, and treelined stream corridors, are critical to maintaining the rural character of Dry Creek Valley. Additional landscaping should be added to enhance the aesthetic quality of the community and serve a wide variety of functions, including glare reduction, visual screening, wind buffer, spatial definition, highlighting architecture, guiding circulation, and creating wildlife habitat.

Landscaping within Hidden Springs shall integrate resource efficient design measures and environmentally compatible plants to ensure drought-resistant and water-conserving vegetation is an integral part of the design. All landscaping within the project should be provided in accordance with the requirements identified in the Hidden Springs Specific Plan.



Tree groves

Guidelines:1. Colors and textures of plant material should be consistent within the overall project common areas yet vary within the individual residential clusters or parcels in order to create unity in the common areas and variety in the individual parcels.

2. The ultimate mature size of plants will be evaluated on maintenance, life span and functional requirements. In areas where screening is needed, plants should be selected upon their form and branching density.

3. A series of linear rows of trees, or "hedgerows", should be planted in the valley floor to help maintain the site's rural character and break down the scale of the residential villages.

4. Street trees of significant size should be planted in the Village Center to shade sidewalks, parking and roadway, and to minimize reflected solar heat.



Hedgerows

5. All plant materials should be evaluated in terms of how well they enhance the architecture, existing plant material, enclose spaces and link various activities within Hidden Springs.

6. Climate influences should be considered in order to get maximum gain out of plant material. Deciduous plants along the south side and west side of buildings will be recommended since they provide summer shade while allowing winter sun to enter the building. Special consideration shall be given to trees with tap roots and/or noninvasive root growth.

7. Plants selected should be grouped/zoned according to water consumption rates and soil requirements. To aid in water conservation,plantings should be confined to planting beds. The use of mulches at appropriate depths shall also be encouraged.

8. Plants which require little maintenance should be favored over those which require constant spraying and pruning. Special attention shall be given to appropriate plant spacings, as this will reduce unwarranted pruning.

9. Plant life cycle should be considered with plant materials. An appropriate mix of slow, medium and fast growth rates shall be encouraged. The result of a proper mix will be a long living, increased drought tolerant and disease resistant stand of vegetation.

10. Proper turf management aids in soil erosion control, dust stabilization, temperature moderation and high ground water recharge. The type and selection of turf areas should be selected in the same manner as all other plantings. When seeding or sodding a new lawn, the best management practices appropriate for the Treasure Valley and this specific property should be utilized. When hydromulching, the grass seed should be mixed into a slurry of water and cellulose and sprayed into the seed bed so that seed, mulch and even a permanganate fertilizer can be applied in one step.

11. Irrigation is critical for healthy plant material, with deep watering the best way to apply water. This promotes deeper roots which are not as susceptible to drought.

All permanent systems are to be below ground and fully automatic. Use of water conserving systems including, but not limited to, drip irrigation and moisture sensors is strongly encouraged. Irrigation heads, where used, are to be adjusted to minimize runoff. All irrigation heads adjacent to paved areas, curbs and turf shall be of pop-up type.

Backflow control devices are to be located so as to minimize their adverse visual impact. In addition, such control devices shall be screened by shrubs.

12. Undeveloped lots or portions of lots outside the building envelope should not be irrigated or ornamentally landscaped. These areas should, however, be enhanced with native, drought-resistant shrubs, grasses and wildflowers to minimize weed growth and erosion.

13. Preserve mature trees, hedgerows, and wood lots, and incorporate as design elements of proposed developments.



Preserve existing mature trees.

14. Utilize open space and landscape buffers to transition from differing land uses, for example farm and rural lots to town center.

15. Encourage buffers between conflicting uses in the Village Center areas (residential vs. commercial), and on farm lots (agricultural practices vs. residential). Planting buffers should screen all off-streetparking areas to the maximum extent practical.

16. Avoid plantings that obstruct sightlines at intersections, and obstruct access to utility equipment.

17. Provide transition areas with low fuel volume plants where high fire hazard areas occur, (adjacent to undeveloped valley, grasslands, wooded hillsides).



Select trees for height, form and density.

18. Require all new landscaping material to be drought tolerant, native and from a list of less palatable and nonpalatable (to wildlife) plant species.

19. Encourage replanting of wildlife food species and plant species which enhance critical habitat for wildlife.

20. Prohibit the installation and require the complete removal of noxious plants and weeds within the development envelope.



Use orchards as screens.

Approved Plant List:
Botanical Name   Common Name  
 
Trees    
Acer grandidentatum   Rocky Mountain Maple  
Alnus sinuata   Sitka Alder  
Amelanchier alnifolia   Serviceberry  
Celtis occidentalis   Hackberry  
Crataeugus sp.   Hawthorn  
Gleditsia triacanthos   Honey Locust  
Populus sp.   Poplar  
Pyrus calleryana   Bradford Pear  
Rhus typhina   Sumac  
 
Shrubs/Groundgovers    
Artemesia tridentata   Big Sage  
Atriplex canescens   Fourwing Saltbrush  
Caragana arborescens   Siberian Pea Shrub  
Cercocarpus montanus   Mountain Mohogany  
Chaenomeles sp.   Quince  
Chrysothamnus nauseosus   Rubber Rabbitbush  
Cornus stolonifera   Asanti Dogwood  
Cornus stolonifera
  "Bailey"  

Redtwig Dogwood  
Cornus stolonifera
  (Kelsey Dwarf)  

Shrub Dogwood  
Elaegnus angustifolia   Russian Olive  
Mahonia repens   Creeping Oregon
       Grape  
Physocarpus opulifolius   Ninebark  
Philadelphus lewisii   Syringa  
Potentilla sp.   Cinquefoil  
Prunus sp.   Spiraea  
Rhus trilobata   Oakbrush Sumac  
Ribes sp.   Current  
Rosa woodsii   Woods Rose  
Salix exigua   Sandbar Willow  
Symphoricarpos albus   Snowberry  

(Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)
http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165699
8-21A-10-6: SIGNAGE:linklink

Introduction:The signage and graphics program within Hidden Springs will follow the overall "ranch" theme of the project. Signage will further reinforce design concepts and provide identification for the residential areas and nonresidential uses. Signage will also be provided for traffic control, along pathways and for public information purposes. In all cases, signs will be kept simple to reduce, not contribute to visual clutter.

Signage throughout the project shall be consistent and compatible. Sizes, styles and configurations will vary depending on the specific purpose, activity level and building materials.

Guidelines:1. General:

a. Lighting and landscaping shall be considered an integral part of all signage proposals.

b. Regardless of style, signs constructed of brick,concrete, wood, stucco, stone and other natural materials with painted or relief cut letters are encouraged.

c. Prohibited signs shall include:

* Signs which constitute a hazard to traffic of pedestrians;
* Signs located within any stream or drainage channel;
* Mobile signs or portable signs; balloons, flags or kite style signs;
* Inflatable signs;
* Signs which produce odor, sound, smoke, flame or other emissions;
* Signs which imitate or simulate official signs, or which use yellow or red blinking or intermittent lights resembling danger or warning signals;
* Signs using strobe lights or individual light bulbs exceeding 75 watts;
* Signs on public property or right of way or signs attached to utility poles, street lights, fences, barns, sheds, or other similar structures; and
* Roof signs and billboards.

d. Free-standing signs should be in proportion/scale to surrounding elements. Emphasis should be placed on sizing signs in relationship to the vehicular vs. pedestrian traffic they serve. Sign faces should only be large enough to accommodate the minimum typeface size and quantity needed to convey the intended message.

2. Residential Signage:

Identification signs will be provided at project entrances as part of the overall entry statement to Hidden Springs. Each residential area may have its own entry statement and signage theme or color combinations.

Monument signs, piers, walls, freestanding monolith/pylons shall be used.





Signage should be proportional in scale to surrounding uses.



Project or residential identification signs shall not exceed six feet (6') in height or one hundredtwenty (120) square feet in area and may be provided on each side of an entrance street. Lighting of residential entrance identification signs shall be indirect, with screened wall or ground-mounted light sources.

3. Commercial Signage:

Commercial signage shall be kept small and subdued to respect the residential character of the community. Commercial establishments shall have a maximum of one identification sign either hung directly on the front facade of the structure from a porch column or roof, or on a post at the entry wall. Commercial signs shall not exceed forty eight (48) square feet in area on facades and twenty four feet (24') if hung from a freestanding post.

4. Special purpose signs:

a. Directional, informational and regulatory signs shall not exceed six feet (6') in height or sixteen (16) square feet in area and shall be compatible throughout the project.

b. Temporary signs shall not exceed six feet (6') in height and twenty four (24) square feet in area. The location and number of temporary signs shall be subject to approval by the DRC.

c. Political signs are permitted to be displayed only on private property and only two (2) weeks prior to an election. They must be removed twenty four (24) hours after the election. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165700
8-21A-10-7: LIGHTING:linklink

Introduction:Lighting in the Hidden Springs community should serve different purposes in the Village Center and rural/residential areas. In the Village Center, small scale intimate lighting for streets, sidewalks, building entries and residential lots is encouraged. In rural residential and along rural roads, lighting should be minimized to reduce light pollution in the community. Main intersections should be lighted for safety purposes only. Lighting shall be functional and efficient, while keeping with the design themes of Hidden Springs. Lighting will vary from larger scale illumination of major roadways to intimate lighting of pathways, building entries or residential lots. In general, to reduce light pollution in the development, overall lighting shall be minimized. Lighting guidelines are outlined below.

Guidelines:All lighting shall be in accordance with the Hidden Springs Zoning Ordinance and subject to approval by the DRC.

1. Fixtures will be of a scale consistent with use.

2. Light fixture style, type and color shall be consistent and compatible throughout the project. The style of light standards along public streets shall be subject to the approval of Ada County and ACHD.

3. In all cases, lighting shall not extend beyond its tasks. Cut-off fixtures shall be used as appropriate.




Lighting fixtures should be proportional to surrounding uses.


4. Illumination levels shall not be in excess of what is required. Lighting design shall address specific functions of activity areas. Site lighting shall beindirect in character.

5. If lighting for signage is provided, it shall relate to signage and graphics and shall heighten the visibility and appearance of signage.

6. Lighting fixtures shall be located so as to minimize shadows and interference.

7. Spillover lighting shall not be permitted. Lighting shall reflect away from adjoining properties.

8. Energy consumption shall be considered in determining lighting fixtures.

9. Light fixtures and sizes should match architectural style of buildings and be proportional to them.

10. Illumination levels should not exceed minimum required levels for its purpose. Design should address specific activities to be lighted.

11. Use of low wattage high life lighting products is encouraged. Use of photo voltaic or other renewable energy sources should be explored. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165701
8-21A-10-8: FENCES AND WALLS:linklink

Introduction:Fencing will be used for safety and securitypurposes, to control pets, enhance area themes, delineate uses and for screening. All fencing shall be approved by the DRC.

1. A consistent fencing theme will be required throughout each individual residential area at Hidden Springs.

Guidelines:1. Fencing on farm/ranch and rural lots shall be located within the building envelope. Additional perimeter fencing may be permitted in conjunction with agricultural practices. (See subsection 8-21A-5C2 of this Article.)



Perimeter fencing of building envelope.

2. Fencing on large lots shall be located within the building envelope without exception.

3. Village and town homes are encouraged to have perimeter fencing located on the perimeter lot lines.

4. Fencing within front yards shall be limited to low (maximum 42 inch height) picket and rail style fencing, walls, hedges, etc. Taller, more opaque fencing should be used in rear and side yards where screening is important. Taller, more opaque rear and side yard fencing should terminate into the sidewalls of residence at least five feet (5') behind front/streetside facade.

5. Adequate site distances shall be maintained along roadways and intersections per Ada County codes and ordinances. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)

http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165702
8-21A-10-9: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION:linklink

1. The clustering of buildings and related landscape is encouraged to maximize contiguous open space.

2. Fencing across critical migration corridors will be limited to a maximum height and minimum kickspace as recommended by Idaho Fish and Game. If barbed wire fencing is used, the bottom wire shall be smooth.

3. All new landscape material on lots outside building envelopes will be required to be drought tolerant, native and from a list of less palatable or nonpalatable plant species.

4. Replanting of wildlife food species and plant species which enhance critical habitat is encouraged.

5. The installation of noxious plants and weeds within the designated development envelope is prohibited by the builder or home owner, and existing materials must be removed.

6. Builders are required to employ "best practices" grading techniques including incremental phasing/reparation, dust controls, grading limit fencing, etc.

7. Modifications to natural drainageways are limited to those which are absolutely necessary or those which increase the effectiveness of the drainageway in carrying storm water and accommodating wildlife.

8. Exposed dumping and composting is prohibited (covered composting is permitted).

9. Residential trash is required to be kept inside the house, garage or appropriate enclosure until the morning of trash collection. Encourage trash containers to have attached lids.

10. Dogs and cats are required to be in latchable carriers or on leashes when outside the residential or commercial lots during critical migration periods as determined by Idaho Fish and Game.

11. Contractors will be prohibited from bringingdogs to construction sites.

12. Motorized vehicles will be limited from roads and trails (four-wheel drive vehicles, snowmobiles and motorcycles) except for construction, fire, emergency and maintenance vehicles.

13. Wildlife educational materials will be included and an acknowledgment of wildlife presence and the potential for property damage in the project's homeowners' documents.

14. Big game crossing signs will be posted at major crossing points along Cartwright Road and Dry Creek Road (maximum 4 signs). Where wildlife and development conflicts continue to occur despite these measures, Hidden Springs will work with local, State and Federal agencies in an attempt to resolve these conflicts. (Ord. 325, 3-12-1997)


Footnote 1: See Section 8-21A-9-47 of this Article.
Footnote 2: See Section 8-21A-9-13 of this Article.
Footnote 3: The gross acreage as adopted by findings by the board of county commissioners is 1,163. The acreage breakdown will be corrected in a future ordinance.

http://sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=&chapter_id=19353#s165703